UPDATE: Local Girl Scouts Council comments on lawsuit win against national Girl Scouts

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FAIRBANKS, Alaska (KTVF)

Update:


We have an update on the Farthest North Girl Scouts winning their Alaska Supreme Court case against the GSUSA.

The Alaska Supreme Court ruled today that the Girl Scouts of the United States of America violated their own constitution when they raised membership dues from $12 to $15 in 2012 and from $15 to $25 in 2016. (John Dougherty/KTVF)

Russ Sharpton, Board Chair with the Farthest North Girl Scouts Council said they are extremely happy about the decision.

“It is a big win for the girls of Alaska. It's also a big win for the national council. The national organization, the National Board had interpreted the governing documents that they shared power with the National Council, and that is not the case, the National Council has the sole power to change dues."

The GSUSA said in an email statement that, “Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) was disappointed by the recent ruling of the Alaska State Supreme Court to reverse the Alaska Superior Court, which had decisively found that the National Board of Girl Scouts of the USA has the power to set membership dues in between National Council Sessions.” They added that they are reviewing their options for further actions.

The Supreme Court only ruled on the first count of the lawsuit, the other counts will be decided on by the Superior Court. It is unclear when the rest of the case will be decided.


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The Alaska Supreme Court ruled today that the Girl Scouts of the United States of America violated their own constitution when they raised membership dues from $12 to $15 in 2012 and from $15 to $25 in 2016.

The court issued their opinion in a lawsuit filed by the Farthest North Girl Scout Council against the GSUSA. The Farthest North Council argued in a 2017 lawsuit that when the GSUSA National Board raised their rates it violated their constitution which they claimed required the National Council which meets every three years to vote to approve a fee increase.

The Farthest North Council lost their suit in a Fairbanks Superior Court when Judge Bethany Harbison sided with the GSUSA. The Farthest North appealed the case to the Supreme Court of Alaska who overturned the lower court ruling.

In their opinion they said, “Because the GSUSA Constitution grants the National Council the exclusive right to establish membership dues, we REVERSE the superior court’s decision.”

They sent the case back to the lower courts for further proceedings on the remaining claims.

We reached out to both the Farthest North Council and the GSUSA but have yet to hear back from them.

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