From meat goat to mascot: the story of Curry the goat

By  | 

FAIRBANKS, Alaska (KTVF) An escaped goat who was being sold for meat evaded arrest in Fairbanks this week.

Curry the goat captured the attention of the city of Fairbanks after the Fairbanks North Star Borough Animal Control posted to Facebook asking for the public's help in catching the goat. (John Dougherty/KTVF)

Curry the goat captured the attention of the city of Fairbanks after the Fairbanks North Star Borough Animal Control posted to Facebook asking for the public's help in catching the goat.

With the public's help he was safely captured.

"He was being marketed with some other goats in a trailer for meat. And somehow he escaped the new owners."

The Fairbanks North Star Borough Animal Control Shelter posted a photo of the animal on Facebook asking the public for help locating a very fast goat.

For the next couple of days the public posted photos of him being spotted around town.

Eventually he was found and caught.

"He was on the lam for a couple days and got picked up by some citizens and the troopers apprehended him and brought him to jail and now I am at the animal control and bailing him out."

The owner of the goat, Paul Finch says that he isn't sure how the name Curry was chosen but he thinks it was either someone on the radio or from social media.

Regardless, the name stuck and soon the goat became an internet celebrity with many people using the hashtag "free curry".

Finch came to the animal shelter on Wednesday to pick up the fugitive but says the plan is no longer to kill him.

"This situation has been fun, it's been a diversion, it's been rewarding, and now we need to let him live. But find a cause bigger than all of us."

That is exactly what he did.

"I work in recovery, and now he has been arrested, he's been in jail, and I believe that he would be a great mascot for the Reentry Coalition or the reentry process for people reentering after incarceration, entering society."

Finch says, many people may be able to relate to Curry.

"You know everybody is rooting for the goat, and everybody wants to see the goat do good, because somehow it might be partly their story. You know and they can relate. So he's not going to be eaten. He'll be pardoned."

Finch even took Curry to The Bridge, to him enroll him in reentry services after his encounter with the law help promote recovery in our community.

And he said he is hoping the borough mayor will pardon Curry so he can continue helping the community.

Anyone needing support services can inquire at the Bridge by going to thebridgefairbanks.org or by calling 374-2905.

Copyright 2019 KTVF. All rights reserved.