Murkowski speaks out on the previous, and upcoming Congress

 

 
The 112th Congress that recently wrapped up, to many people, set precedents that a lot of lawmakers aren't writing home about.
 
And one veteran U.S. Senator from Alaska says its her mission to change certain ways of thinking.
 
They've been called "Do–nothing," "Polarized" and the "Least productive Congress on record.
 
The recently departed 112th Congress got no respect from the news media.
 
As the House and Senate expired on January 3rd, critics called the 112th the most unproductive compared with any Congress since 1948, when scholars began keeping tabs on congressional productivity.
 
News Center 11 caught up with U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski earlier this week shortly before she left Fairbanks, and she told us she vows that things will be different, saying "I don't want to be part of a dysfunctional body I want this congress to work. The American people expect us to perform. We haven't passed a budget out of the senate in three years in my view that inexcusable it's unforgivable. So what can we do to change this dynamics I have suggested is what we need to do is is we need to have is called regular order. In other words, we need to follow the rules we need to have committees that actually work that produce legislation that then come to the floor, that we debate, take amendments on and then pass. But the process has just gotten so snarled up in the politics that we are not governing it is inexcusable where we are right now."
 
REACHED FOR COMMENT AT FAIRBANKS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, MURKOWSKI ALSO TALKED ABOUT THE MANY ISSUES NEEDING TO BE TACKLED BY CONGRESS ONCE THE 113TH CONGRESS GETS UNDERWAY LATER THIS MONTH.
 
MURKOWSKI DETAILED GUN LEGISLATION, AND OF COURSE, THE ECONOMY IN THE WAKE OF RECENT AND HOT BUTTON "FISCAL CLIFF" NEGOTIATIONS.
 
SHE ALSO SAYS TO GET READY FOR MORE OF THOSE SAME ISSUES: "We're gonna have some of fiscal cliff coming at us right around the first of March the first iteration was bad enough, but what I believe what we have in front of us, with the debt ceiling with the prospect of sequestration coming the second of March as well as the expiration of the continuing resolution through the end of march this is kind of a combination of fiscal events coming at us I think like a freight train. We've got a responsibility to deal with the spending side of the equation we did not do that before Christmas before new year's we dealt with one small aspect and that was as portion of the taxes but we all know you don't get out of a 16 dollar trillion hole with just revenues alone we have got to deal with the spending in an aggressive and meaningful way we've got our work cut out for us."