Army News: Beginning August 1st, any soldier who elects to transfer Post 9/11 G.I. Bill will incur 4 years in the Army, "without regard to their time in service."

Starting on August 1st, 2013 any soldier who elects to transfer his or her Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Benefits to family members will incur an additional four years in the Army, "without regard to their time in service."

According to the United States Army, the changes to the Bill were drafted in 2009.

The rule largely affects senior officers and enlisted Soldiers who are retirement-eligible.

As of now, these Soldiers may be able to transfer benefits to their families with anywhere from zero to three years of additional service.

Soldiers who are not retirement eligible and who elect to transfer their GI Bill benefits to a family member will need to reinstate their time in service for an additional four years.

The Army is drawing down and some Soldiers will be involuntarily separated.

Those who are and who previously transferred their Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits to dependents can retain them.

 

 

 

 

 

Starting on August 1st, 2013 any soldier who elects to transfer his or her Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Benefits to family members will incur an additional four years in the Army, "without regard to their time in service."

According to the United States Army, the changes to the Bill were drafted in 2009.

The rule largely affects senior officers and enlisted Soldiers who are retirement-eligible.

As of now, these Soldiers may be able to transfer benefits to their families with anywhere from zero to three years of additional service.

Soldiers who are not retirement eligible and who elect to transfer their GI Bill benefits to a family member will need to reinstate their time in service for an additional four years.

The Army is drawing down and some Soldiers will be involuntarily separated.

Those who are and who previously transferred their Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits to dependents can retain them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting on August 1st, 2013 any soldier who elects to transfer his or her Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Benefits to family members will incur an additional four years in the Army, "without regard to their time in service."

According to the United States Army, the changes to the Bill were drafted in 2009.

The rule largely affects senior officers and enlisted Soldiers who are retirement-eligible.

As of now, these Soldiers may be able to transfer benefits to their families with anywhere from zero to three years of additional service.

 

 

 

 

Soldiers who are not retirement eligible and who elect to transfer their GI Bill benefits to a family member will need to reinstate their time in service for an additional four

Starting on August 1st, 2013 any soldier who elects to transfer his or her Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Benefits to family members will incur an additional four years in the Army, "without regard to their time in service."

According to the United States Army, the changes to the Bill were drafted in 2009.

The rule largely affects senior officers and enlisted Soldiers who are retirement-eligible.

As of now, these Soldiers may be able to transfer benefits to their families with anywhere from zero to three years of additional service.

Soldiers who are not retirement eligible and who elect to transfer their GI Bill benefits to a family member will need to reinstate their time in service for an additional four years.