Political News from Yahoo

Has Putin Picked His Next Targets?

There are increasing signs that the unrest in Eastern Ukraine is spreading, and Odessa, the country’s third largest city, could be the next to fall.


The Seedy Side of Sainthood

As the faithful descend on Rome for the double canonization of John Paul II and John XXIII, critics say the two popes were pushed through to sainthood without a thorough vetting.


Mississippi Prefers Pork to Tea

In an attempt to slip into a Senate seat, Republican candidate Chris McDaniel has abandoned home state issues to focus on national matters—and state voters don’t like the taste of it.


Taliban Peacemaker Locked Up

A key voice for reconciliation in Afghanistan has been missing for weeks after an apparent arrest. Why the prime suspect is Pakistan—and the motive to sabotage any potential peace deal.


Iceland Is Beautiful—and So Weird

A land of fire, ice, and elves, Iceland is a beacon of nature’s majesty and culture. It’s also quite possibly the strangest place ever. And that’s precisely why you should go.


A Prenup for Digital Privacy

Celebrities and power couples are asking for digital protection in their pre- and post-nup marriage agreements, but having something to hide isn’t necessarily the reason.


No, You Can’t Check if I’m a Felon

A job hopeful might have an arrest record, but employers can’t find out until after making a job offer. It’s just one of many bills nationwide rolling back criminal background checks.


Ms. Kwan Hits the Campaign Trail

Once tasked with nailing triple Lutzes and Salchows, Michelle Kwan may soon be Rhode Island's first lady. The story behind her political rise (and that infamous Prius).


That's Mr. Dickhead to You

The founder of Iceland's Phallological Museum, famous for his quest to add a human penis to the collection, feels deceived by the documentary 'The Final Member.'


Dude, Weed Won’t Rot Your Brain

Can casual marijuana use damage the brains of young adults? A new study says yes—but its participants suggest otherwise.


Let's defend 'Obamacare,' some Democrats say

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some Democrats say it's time to stop hiding from President Barack Obama's health care overhaul — even in this year's toughest Senate elections — given that enrollments are higher than expected and costs are lower.


Ukraine, US to alternately cajole, threaten Russia

GENEVA (AP) — Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.


California Governor Brown wants rainy-day fund in constitution

By Sharon Bernstein SACRAMENTO, California (Reuters) - California Governor Jerry Brown on Wednesday stepped up his efforts to enshrine a rainy day fund in the state's constitution, stealing some thunder from Republicans backing a similar measure as he seeks an unprecedented fourth term. Brown, a Democrat who has followed a path of fiscal restraint since returning as governor in 2011 from two previous terms of office in the 1970s and '80s, is widely credited with restoring stability to California's battered budget after years of multibillion-dollar deficits. "We simply must prevent the massive deficits of the last decade, and we can only do that by paying down our debts and creating a solid rainy day fund," Brown said. On Wednesday, he called a special session of the Legislature for next week to discuss his plan for requiring the state to set aside money earned from volatile investments such as those in the stock market in flush years for use later during lean times.


Detroit pension deal approved by one retirement system

The board of Detroit's General Retirement System on Wednesday approved economic terms of a settlement with the city that include cuts to pension benefits, putting in place another key component of Detroit's effort to exit bankruptcy by October. The city also has reached a tentative pact with the city's other pension fund, the Detroit Police and Fire Retirement System, whose board is expected to vote later this week. Together, the two pension funds represent some 23,000 active members and retirees. The settlements were incorporated into a new draft of the city's bankruptcy plan, filed with the federal bankruptcy court late Wednesday, hours before U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes was scheduled to hear objections to the proposed restructuring.


Defend 'Obamacare' unabashedly, some Democrats say

WASHINGTON (AP) — The outlook for the president's health care overhaul suddenly appears brighter, and some Democrats are saying it's time for the party to openly embrace the law that Republicans consider their best campaign weapon.


Pro-Russian gunmen make inroads in eastern Ukraine

SLOVYANSK, Ukraine (AP) — The well-armed, Moscow-backed insurgency sowing chaos in eastern Ukraine scored a new victory Wednesday, seizing armored vehicles and weapons from underequipped government forces, then rolling through two cities to a hero's welcome.


Sacramento mayor to lead national mayoral group

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson was sworn in Wednesday as the new leader of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, a platform that raises the national political profile of the NBA All-Star.


US readies sanctions, demands concessions from Russia

The United States warned Wednesday it was "actively preparing" new sanctions to hit Russia if critical Ukraine talks do not produce concessions from Moscow. US officials privately signaled they had little hope that the Geneva talks between Russia, Ukraine, the European Union and Washington would make significant progress. They also revealed that the toughest available sanctions -- those targeting key sectors of the Russian economy -- would only come into force in the event of a full-scale Russian invasion of Ukraine.


Consumer groups win appeal to reveal Company Doe

WASHINGTON (AP) — We soon could know the identity of the manufacturer — only known now as "Company Doe" — in a product safety case that has been linked to a child's death.

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