Political News from Yahoo

The Cheerleader Murders

For five long and very strange years, death haunted tiny Dryden, NY, a town near the Finger Lakes where a plague of car accidents, suicides, and even grisly murders involving two popular cheerleaders just kept mounting up.


Can HRC Count on Women This Time?

They famously supported her in 2008—until they helped Obama win Iowa. So will the grandmother-to-be inspire female voters next cycle, or will they judge her on a harsher scale?


Watch the Week in 90 Seconds

From the death of a literary titan to the shooting spree at Kansas Jewish centers to NASA’s discovery of Earth’s ‘cousin,’ catch up on the past week’s biggest stories.


Rand Paul and the Welfare Rancher

The Nevada rancher’s escalating standoff with the feds raises a worrisome question: Can Americans’ relationship with their government—and each other—be saved?


Hollywood’s Worst Medical Errors

From doctors doing surgery without masks on to Wolverine’s true love dying via diuretic, TV and film are full of medical errors.


The Fringe Faith Duping The GOP

It’s a tiny religion featuring fembots, creationists, and a leader who says his ‘Holocaust Deception’ book was a mistake. Why are so many in the GOP appearing on its TV network?


The Afghanistan to D.C. Express

An illustrated story about a Marine officer recovering in the hospital after being evacuated from Afghanistan.


Another U.S. Mumps Outbreak

This week, New Jersey joined New York and Ohio as the third U.S. location to have a mumps outbreak this year—and it probably won’t be the last. Is it time for mandatory vaccines?


The Search for General Tso

A new documentary premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival explores how and why General Tso’s chicken became a cultural touchstone.


Hollywood’s ‘Twink’ Pool Parties

Wild nights of no clothes and lots of alcohol: one attendee reveals what went on at X Men director Bryan Singer’s infamous pool parties.


From Clinton to Obama, many parallels

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of pages of documents from President Bill Clinton's White House affirm a longtime adage: The more things change, the more they stay the same.


US delays decision on Keystone pipeline project

The United States indefinitely extended the review process for a controversial Canada-to-US oil pipeline Friday, potentially delaying a final decision on the project until beyond mid-term elections in November. The US State Department said eight federal agencies -- which had been given until the end of May to submit views on the matter -- would now have a longer window to weigh in on the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline. "This project will create tens of thousands of jobs on both sides of the border, will enhance the energy security of North America, has strong public support and the US State Department has, on multiple occasions, acknowledged it will be environmentally sound," the statement added. Analysts say President Barack Obama, who has the final say on the pipeline, is caught in a classic no-win dilemma -- facing the prospect of losing votes in critical November 4 mid-term elections whatever he decides.


US puts off decision on Keystone XL pipeline

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is putting off its decision on the Keystone XL oil pipeline, likely until after the November elections, by extending its review of the controversial project indefinitely.


Obama signs law aimed at barring Iran UN envoy

President Barack Obama signed into law Friday a bill designed to bar Iran's pick for UN ambassador from US soil over his links to the 1979 American embassy hostage siege. But Obama also issued a statement saying that he would only regard the legislation as guidance, warning it could infringe upon his executive powers as president. The spat over Hamid Aboutalebi's nomination has blown up amid a cautious thaw in relations between the US and Iran as Tehran's new leadership seeks to negotiate a nuclear treaty with global powers. The United States said earlier this week that it would not issue a visa to Aboutalebi because he was involved in the hostage crisis at the US embassy in Tehran.


Progress but no deal in US-Japan TPP trade talks

The United States said Friday there had been progress but no final deal in talks with Japan that are crucial to advancing the ambitious 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. Negotiations failed to achieve a significant breakthrough just days before US President Barack Obama, who has made the TPP a key goal of his administration, arrives in Tokyo on a state visit. Intense negotiations this week narrowed the gap between the two sides, but "considerable differences remain," US Trade Representative Michael Froman said after his meetings with Japanese Minister for Economic and Fiscal Policy Akira Amari. The two sides have been wrestling in particular over Japan's barriers to importing US autos and farm products.


Obama signs law to bar Iran diplomat from serving in U.N. post

President Barack Obama signed a law on Friday that effectively bars an Iranian diplomat from serving as an envoy at the United Nations because of suspicions he was involved in the 1979-81 Tehran hostage crisis. Obama signed a law passed by the U.S. Congress that blocks any individual from entering the United States who has been found to have been engaged in espionage or terrorist activity against the United States or if that person may pose a threat to U.S. national security. The United States had already said it would not grant a visa to Iran's proposed U.N. ambassador, citing the envoy's links to the 1979-1981 hostage crisis.


Supreme Court denies Teva stay in Copaxone patent fight

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts on Friday denied a request by Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd to stay a lower-court ruling in a patent case that favored the developers of generic versions of Teva's top-selling multiple sclerosis drug. The decision could help pave the way for generic competitors of Teva's Copaxone drug to go on the market as soon as next month. Teva had sought to prevent the lower-court ruling from going into effect while the Supreme Court considers its appeal in the patent fight. At issue is a July 2013 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in favor of two teams developing cheaper generic forms of Copaxone: one comprising Novartis AG's Sandoz Inc and Momenta Pharmaceuticals Inc, and the other comprising Mylan Inc and Natco Pharma Ltd. In his decision on Friday, Roberts, in a brief opinion, wrote that he was not convinced Teva had shown the "likelihood of irreparable harm" if the application was denied, because if Teva wins the Supreme Court case it can seek damages from the generic companies for past infringement on its patents.


Obama disgusted by anti-Jewish leaflets in Ukraine

US President Barack Obama made clear his "disgust" at anti-Jewish leaflets handed out in east Ukraine's main city, his top national security aide said Friday. The pamphlets telling Jews to register or be expelled were distributed in the city of Donetsk and sparked global outrage and fears of a Nazi-style pogrom. "The president expressed his disgust quite bluntly," said Obama's national security advisor Susan Rice. Rice said that Secretary of State John Kerry, who condemned the leaflets on Thursday in Geneva, had made US objections clear to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.


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