Political News from Yahoo

House panel to hold contempt vote on IRS official

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House committee is voting on whether to hold a former Internal Revenue Service official in contempt of Congress for refusing to answer questions at a pair of hearings.


Our Mindless Government

From infrastructure improvements to entitlement spending, government is on autopilot, according to author Philip K. Howard. It’s a ‘form of tyranny,’ he says, and disaster is looming.


Lost Masterpieces Found in Kitchen

A retired Italian autoworker unwittingly bought two stolen art masterpieces worth millions for $32 and kept them on his kitchen wall for nearly 40 years.


Is ‘Fargo’ Bloody Good? You Betcha

Menacing and suspenseful with surprising notes of satire and pulpy violence, FX’s ‘Fargo’ is most certainly not a pale imitation of the Coens’ gruesome dark comedy.


Giving It Up in H.G. Wells’s Home

Angelica Garnett's memoir of growing up amid the weirdness of Bloomsbury features the usual literary suspects, including Virginia Woolf, and not a few surprises.


Paralyzed No More

There’s new hope for paralysis patients. A study reports electrical stimulation and physical therapy helped wheelchair-bound patients stand for more than four minutes.


When Downtown Was Cool

Greenwich Village holds a mythical place in the history of NYC. Three legends in their own right remember the neighborhood that helped shape them into the artists they have become.


How Prisons Became Insane Asylums

A new study reveals that prisons in America house ten times as many mentally ill as the state-run psychiatric wards that could actually treat them.


Life After Sonic Youth

Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon on post-band life, finding her voice as a visual artist, and the time she did a watercolor of Blondie…


We’re All Stalkers Now

Smartphones have turned us into creeps—snapping strangers’ photos, tweeting about the person next to us on the train. It’s time to check ourselves.


How Does Your Lady Garden Grow?

The decision to ‘grow out the lady garden’ rather than succumb to landscaping has become a feminist issue worth debating—if only to quiet outdated societal standards once and for all.


Hagel pushes US military ties with China's neighbour Mongolia

Pentagon chief Chuck Hagel Thursday endorsed stronger military ties with Mongolia as it seeks a US partnership as a counterweight to its powerful neighbours Russia and China. Hagel and his Mongolian counterpart Dashdemberel Bat-Erdene signed a "joint vision" statement in Ulan Bator calling for expanding military cooperation through joint training and assistance. The document is mostly symbolic but is likely to irritate Beijing, which has accused Washington of trying to hold back its rise by cultivating military ties with smaller Asian neighbours. "A strong US-Mongolia defence relationship is important as part of the American rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region," Hagel told a joint press conference, referring to a strategic "pivot" that China has eyed with concern.


Senate hopeful Brown: Health law costs liberty

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Hoping to return to Washington by way of New Hampshire, former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown is using a variation of the state's "Live Free or Die" motto to argue against President Barack Obama's health care overhaul law.

Hagel seeks to increase ties with Mongolia

ULAN BATOR, Mongolia (AP) — U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is seeking to bolster U.S. military relations with Mongolia as he wraps up 10-day trip to the Asia-Pacific.


New voting laws roll back U.S. civil rights strides of 1960s: Bill Clinton

Restrictions on voting rights in conservative states endanger the core of the U.S. civil rights movement and force Americans to recreate "a yesterday we're better off done with," former President Bill Clinton said on Wednesday. Speaking to a crowd of students and activists in Austin, Texas, Clinton slammed new voting laws that require photo IDs, make voting harder for students, or otherwise tighten up access to the polls. "We all know what this is about," Clinton said at a gathering called the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon Baines Johnson presidential library. "This is a way of restricting the franchise after 50 years of expanding it." Last year the Justice Department separately sued Texas and North Carolina to block voter-identification laws.


Clinton: New voter restrictions are a step back

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Former President Bill Clinton used the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act to criticize efforts in several states to restrict voting, notably photo identification requirements, saying they threaten to roll back half a century of progress.


Ethics complaint against Rep. Tom Cotton dismissed

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A House ethics panel dismissed a complaint against Arkansas congressman and Republican U.S. Senate hopeful Tom Cotton that accused him of illegally soliciting donations during a radio interview at the U.S. Capitol, according to a letter released by his campaign Wednesday.


Obama blasts 'least productive Congress in modern history'

By Steve Holland HOUSTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama sharply criticized what he called the least productive U.S. Congress in modern history on Wednesday in a fund-raising speech that he used to try to energize Democrats to vote in November congressional elections. Obama blasted Republicans in the U.S. Senate for blocking a Democratic-supported bill earlier in the day aimed at addressing a gap in pay between male and female workers. Republicans argued that pay discrimination is already illegal. Obama also cited Republicans' refusal to agree to an immigration overhaul and an increase in the minimum wage as examples of what he called obstruction by his political opponents.


Thank God It Wasn’t Guns

Twenty-one were stabbed in a Pennsylvania school rampage Wednesday, but all are expected to live—and one even took a selfie. Think how different the toll would have been with bullets.


Was 'Cuban Twitter' program political or not?

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is looking into whether a "Cuban Twitter" program secretly backed by the U.S. government contained messages that were political in nature, despite assertions from the administration that the effort was intended only to increase the flow of information in a country that heavily restricts Internet access.


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