Political News from Yahoo

The Cult of the Baby General

Baby photos of the Hermit Kingdom’s hereditary dictator are meant to reinforce North Korea’s state religion of moral and racial purity.


Green Power or Cheap Power? You Choose.

Not only can homes with photovoltaic cells and wind turbines generate electricity, but they can also sell that juice on the backs of grids that the power companies pay to maintain. No wonder they’re asking states to tax renewables.


How LEGO Conquered Hollywood

‘Beyond the Brick,’ which premieres at the Tribeca Film Festival, is more than just the story of a toy we’ve all come to love. At its core, it’s a documentary about survival.


The Tastiest Art Exhibit

The most recent exhibition at New York’s David Zwirner Gallery converts the traditionally sterile space into a fully functional chocolate factory with candy free for the taking.


Vivian Maier: Still Missing

After discovering a trove of unknown photographs at an auction, John Maloof set about exposing the nanny-cum-artist who took them. But does ‘Finding Vivian Maier’ tell the whole story?


In the Obamacare Closet

The only way to gauge the success of the law is by the Dems who outwardly support it and the Republicans who stop publicly attacking it.


He’s Got a Ticket to Write

The train Dominic Utton took to work broke down a lot. Each time it happened, he wrote to the railroad. They wrote back. And a novel was born.


Mississippi sets 20-week limit on abortions

(Reuters) - Mississippi will ban abortions after more than 20 weeks of pregnancy from July, joining other conservative U.S. states that have placed restrictions on the procedure. A handful of states have in recent years enacted laws that place restrictions on the procedure, especially on late-term abortions, citing hotly debated medical research that a fetus feels pain at 20 weeks of gestation, halfway through a full-term pregnancy. "Today is an important day for protecting the unborn and the health and safety of women in Mississippi," Governor Phil Bryant said in a statement after signing the bill, which becomes law on July 1. In Mississippi, abortions would be legal after 20 weeks if a woman's life was in danger or if the fetus suffers "from fetal abnormalities so great that life outside the womb is not viable," said Bryant, a Republican.

Taliban ready to deal on captive US soldier?

WASHINGTON (AP) — The captors of an American soldier held for nearly five years in Afghanistan have signaled a willingness to release him but are unclear which U.S. government officials have the authority to make a deal, according to two individuals in the military working for his release. Critics of the release effort blame disorganization and poor communication among the numerous federal agencies involved.

Obama to Russia: More sanctions are 'teed up'

TOKYO (AP) — Accusing Russia of failing to live up to its commitments, President Barack Obama warned Moscow on Thursday that the United States has another round of economic sanctions "teed up" — even as he acknowledged those penalties may do little to influence Vladimir Putin's handling of the crisis in Ukraine.


Obama: US would defend Japan in islands dispute

TOKYO (AP) — Showing solidarity with Japan, President Barack Obama affirmed Thursday that the U.S. would be obligated to defend Tokyo in a confrontation with Beijing over a set of disputed islands, but urged all sides to resolve the long-running dispute peacefully.


Obama calls for peaceful end to island dispute

TOKYO (AP) — Standing next to Japan's leader, President Barack Obama affirmed Thursday that the U.S. would be obligated to defend Tokyo in a confrontation with Beijing over a set of disputed islands, but urged all sides to resolve the long-running dispute peacefully.


Obama uses Japan visit to reassure wary Asian allies

By Linda Sieg and Matt Spetalnick TOKYO (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama used a state visit to Japan on Thursday to try to reassure Asian allies of his commitment to ramping up U.S. engagement in the region, despite Chinese complaints that his real aim is to contain Beijing's rise. Obama is being treated to a display of pomp and ceremony meant to show that the U.S.-Japan alliance, the main pillar of America's security strategy in Asia, remains solid at a time of rising tensions over growing Chinese assertiveness and North Korean nuclear threats. "As you said, my visit here, I think, once again represents my deep belief that a strong U.S.-Japan relationship is not only good for our countries, but good for the world," Obama told Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the start of their summit. "Our shared democratic values mean that we have to work together in multilateral settings to deal with regional hot spots Around the globe, but also to try make sure we are creating a strong set of rules that govern the international order." Behind the scenes, U.S. and Japanese trade negotiators for the two countries were working around the clock in Tokyo on a two-way trade pact seen as crucial to a broader trans-Pacific agreement.


Obama offering Japan security, economic assurances

TOKYO (AP) — President Barack Obama is seeking to reassure Japanese leaders Thursday that he can deliver on his security and economic pledges to Asia even as the crisis in Ukraine demands U.S. attention and resources elsewhere.


Pentagon dossier to detail secretive U.S. Afghan detainee policy

Some are suspected fighters from Yemen, Russia or Pakistan, arrested by U.S. forces in Afghanistan or elsewhere. Several have been linked to al Qaeda. As the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan winds down, the White House will soon provide Congress a dossier on about 50 non-Afghan detainees in a U.S. military prison north of Kabul. Their uncertain fate presents sensitive security and legal problems for the Obama administration in an echo of Guantanamo Bay.


NTSB head: Action needed now on oil train safety

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration needs to take steps immediately to protect the public from potentially catastrophic oil train accidents even if it means using emergency authority, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman said Wednesday.

Rail safety effort marred by squabbling

WASHINGTON (AP) — Spurred by a series of fiery train crashes, a push by government and industry to make safer tank cars used for shipping crude oil and ethanol has bogged down in squabbling and finger-pointing over whether they're needed and if so, who should pay.


Was Madeline McCann One of Many?

A new development in the formerly closed case finds detectives scrambling to uncover new leads stemming from the revelation that a suspect in 18 other nearby break-ins fit the same description.


Cuban top diplomat meets with attorney of jailed American

Cuba's top diplomat has met with a lawyer for jailed US contractor Alan Gross who is serving a 15-year term in Cuban prison, his defense team said Wednesday. Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez met with Gross's lawyer Scott Gilbert on Wednesday in Havana, stressing Cuba's willingness to speak with the United States on the case, Gilbert's team said in a statement released in Washington. Rodriguez emphasized that Cuba would place no preconditions on such a negotiation," the statement explained.


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