Political News from Yahoo

The End of Heart Attacks

A world without heart disease seems impossible. But researchers at Johns Hopkins just got one step closer.


Hollywood’s Scandalous Lothario

The handsome actor discusses his role in ‘The Other Woman’ as a cheating lothario and one of the most controversial scenes in ‘Game of Thrones’ history.


Republicans Are Racist? That Can’t Be

The revolting comments. The emails. The jokes. The posters. The T-shirts. The ghostwriters. It’s not like it’s a pattern or something.


Putin’s Preemptive Medal of Honor

A now-hidden medallion awarded to former Ukrainians undermines the Kremlin’s narrative of when the ‘liberation of Crimea’ really began.


America's New Red Line For China

The president promised Tokyo that the U.S. would protect Japan’s sovereignty over the Senkaku Islands—but after Syria and Crimea, Obama’s tough talk may fail to impress Beijing.


US, Japan say Pacific trade talks make headway

TOKYO (AP) — Closing two days of around the clock negotiations, U.S. officials said Friday that they reached a breakthrough with Japan to move forward a stalled regional trade pact even though gaps remain that could still upend a final agreement.


US, Japan say TPP trade talks make headway

TOKYO (AP) — Closing two days of around the clock negotiations, U.S. officials said Friday that they reached a breakthrough with Japan to move forward a stalled regional trade pact even though gaps remain that could still upend a final agreement.


Exclusive: Obama may call EU leaders in Russia sanctions push - sources

By Arshad Mohammed WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama is expected to speak to several European leaders on Friday to try to nudge the EU toward fresh sanctions against Russia over Ukraine, sources familiar with the matter said. Disagreements among European Union nations on whether to impose new economic sanctions on Russia have held up punitive steps by the United States, said the sources on condition of anonymity, but Washington could also act on its own. U.S. ...


Obama due in Seoul as N. Korea nuclear test fears grow

Barack Obama headed to Seoul Friday on the second leg of a tour of Asia, as new satellite images suggested North Korea was defiantly readying to stage a nuclear test. Pyongyang's apparent push could further complicate his visit to a country raw with emotion, where around 300 people are dead or missing after a ferry carrying hundreds of school children capsized last week. The US president is expected to offer personal condolences to his South Korean counterpart Park Geun-Hye over the tragedy, but the nation's unpredictable neighbour is set to dominate the agenda. Satellite photos taken just two days ago showed additional activity at the Punggye-ri test site that is "probably related to preparations for a detonation," the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University said.


What Bundy’s Fans Said, Before and After

The Nevada rancher’s breathtakingly racist comments Wednesday left Republican supporters racing to distance themselves. What they’re saying now.


Colorado lawmakers advance bill to crack down on 'revenge porn'

By Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - A bill that would criminalize the posting of intimate images over the Internet as an act of humiliation - so-called "revenge porn" - passed its first test in the Colorado state legislature on Thursday, sailing unanimously through a key committee. The bipartisan proposal passed through the state House Judiciary Committee by an 11-0 vote after members heard more than two hours of testimony. The bill's Republican sponsor, Representative Amy Stephens, said after the hearing that victims of such activities would be vulnerable if an ex-partner decided to post embarrassing photos or videos online, making them readily accessible to the general public or an employer, for example. "I'm pleased that Colorado is taking steps to protect victims of cyber crime," she said.

California lawmakers aim to tighten handgun restrictions

By Sharon Bernstein SACRAMENTO, California (Reuters) - A bill banning the sale of single-shot handguns that can be modified into semi-automatic weapons advanced in the California legislature on Thursday as lawmakers sought to close what the bill's supporters say is a loophole in the state's gun safety laws. Gun control advocates say thousands of weapons are sold in California each year without a required safety feature that indicates when a bullet is in the chamber, endangering children and others who may be shot accidentally. "Right now there is a very large opening in the law that permits guns that otherwise we wouldn't consider safe for sale and purchase in California," said Sacramento assemblyman Roger Dickinson, a Democrat who authored the bill. Under existing law, semi-automatic weapons must have an indicator showing when there is a bullet in the chamber.

Pedophile Drugged and Abused 90 Students

How did an American educator’s child-molesting past elude authorities on four continents? Officials say thou-sands of International school boys may have crossed paths with William Vahey.


Japan minister says no accord with US over TPP trade deal

Japan's economy minister said Friday that Tokyo had not reached a basic accord with Washington over a Pacific-wide trade deal despite intense talks after a bilateral summit. There had been hopes that Tokyo and Washington might break an impasse in the stalled talks during US President Barack Obama's visit to Tokyo. Speaking hours before Obama's departure, however, Japanese economy minister Akira Amari said what had been achieved was "not a basic accord although there was progress".


South Korea ferry disaster may cloud Obama visit

TOKYO (AP) — When President Barack Obama arrives in South Korea on Friday, he will be thrust anew into the role of consoler in chief in a time of crisis, a responsibility he has become all too accustomed to in the United States.


Nevada rancher defends remarks, loses supporters

LAS VEGAS (AP) — A Nevada rancher who became a conservative folk hero for standing up to the government in a fight over grazing rights lost some of his staunch defenders Thursday after wondering aloud whether blacks might have had it better under slavery.

Arkansas judge voids state voter ID law

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas judge struck down the state's new voter ID law on Thursday, saying it violates the state constitution by adding a requirement that voters must meet before casting a ballot.

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