Political News from Yahoo

Sen. Feinstein and the Pink Drone

The Democrat had Washington rapt with her tale of being spied on at home—by what might have been a kids’ toy. If it was, Code Pink’s chief says ‘mission accomplished.’


Internet Harassment Is Nothing New

The web makes it easier for misogynists to stalk women online, but the real problem is a very old and ingrained mindset that expects women to be silent and subservient.


Too Damn Handsome For Oscar?

Robert Redford, Peter O’Toole, Cary Grant, and even Clooney and DiCaprio. In the last 86 years, on Oscar night the most beautiful dudes tend to lose—if they've even been nominated.


Budget-deal vote brings rare truce in fiscal wars

WASHINGTON (AP) — After last fall's tumultuous, bitterly partisan debt ceiling and government shutdown battles, a sense of fiscal fatigue seems to be setting in among many Washington policymakers as President Barack Obama prepares for his fifth State of the Union address later this month.


Obama to back modest gov't surveillance reforms

WASHINGTON (AP) — Capping a monthslong review, President Barack Obama is expected to back modest changes to the government's surveillance network at home and abroad while largely leaving the framework of the controversial programs in place, including the bulk collection of phone records from millions of Americans.


Surgeon general urges new resolve to end smoking

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's no secret that smoking causes lung cancer. But what about diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction? Fifty years into the war on smoking, scientists still are adding diseases to the long list of cigarettes' harms — even as the government struggles to get more people to kick the habit.


Christie facing GOP donors as bridge scandal boils

MIAMI (AP) — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie faces one of his first major tests since his backyard political scandal erupted: reassuring top Republican donors that he has taken steps to address allegations of political payback in his home state and that he remains a viable presidential contender for the party's establishment.


US Sen. Coburn to resign after current session

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Sen. Tom Coburn has announced he will resign at the end of the current session of Congress, nearly two years before his term is scheduled to end.


Surgeon general adds to list of smoking's harms

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's no secret that smoking causes lung cancer. But what about diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction? Fifty years into the war on smoking, scientists still are adding diseases to the long list of cigarettes' harms — even as the government struggles to get more people to kick the habit.

Oklahoma Senator Coburn, battling cancer, to resign at year end

(Reuters) - U.S. Senator Tom Coburn, a Republican from Oklahoma, said on Thursday that he would leave Congress at the end of this year. Coburn, 65, said in a statement that although he is battling cancer, that was not the reason he decided to resign. "In the meantime, I look forward to finishing this year strong." Coburn's departure is not likely to alter the political calculus of the Senate, since he comes from a solidly Republican state.


Senate approves U.S. budget bill, ends shutdown threat

By David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Washington's battles over government funding ended with a whimper on Thursday as the U.S. Senate approved a $1.1 trillion spending bill that quells for nearly nine months the threat of another federal agency shutdown. President Barack Obama is expected to sign it into law by Saturday. The vote came exactly three months after the end of a 16-day government shutdown in October that was waged over disputed funding of "Obamacare," the president's signature health care law. "We're a little late, but we have gotten the job done," Senate Appropriations Committee Barbara Mikulski said on the Senate floor.


Congress cuts funding for horse slaughter

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Congress has again cut funding for inspections at horse slaughterhouses, the latest blow to efforts to resume horse slaughter in the U.S.

U.S. budget watchdog eyes steps to control military health costs

By David Alexander WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The most effective way to control the rising expense of the military healthcare system is to boost cost-sharing among retirees, the Congressional Budget Office said on Thursday, endorsing an unpopular step Congress has repeatedly rejected. The non-partisan CBO said the Defense Department spent some $52 billion in 2012 for its TRICARE healthcare program, which covers about 1.8 million troops and their 2.6 million family members, plus 5.2 million military retirees and their families. That's nearly 10 percent of the Pentagon's $530 billion budget base budget for 2012 and about $5,400 per person. The budget office, in a 42-page report, said policymakers had considered several initiatives to control costs, including better management of chronic diseases, more effective administration of the healthcare system and increasing cost-sharing among military retirees.


Bill offered in U.S. Congress to modernize Voting Rights Act

By Thomas Ferraro WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Voting Rights Act of 1965 would be modernized under a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. Congress on Thursday in response to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year that gutted a core part of the landmark law. The legislation would provide a new formula to determine if any state or locality - not just those with a history of racial discrimination - should be required to obtain prior federal approval to changes in its election rules. A top Republican, Representative Jim Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin, joined two Democrats - Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Representative John Conyers of Michigan - to take the lead in drafting the measure. But it was unclear when the Democratic-led Senate and Republican-led House of Representatives, which have clashed on most issues in recent years, would take it up.


Senate easily passes $1.1 trillion spending bill

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a $1.1 trillion government-wide spending bill Thursday, easing the harshest effects of last year's automatic budget cuts after tea party critics chastened by October's partial shutdown mounted only a faint protest.


Senate approves $1.1 trillion bill to end government funding battle

Washington's battles over government funding ended with a whimper on Thursday as the U.S. Senate approved a $1.1 trillion spending bill that quells for nearly nine months the threat of another federal agency shutdown. The measure, which funds thousands of government programs from the military to national parks through the September 30 fiscal year-end, passed by a strong, 72-26 majority. President Barack Obama is expected to sign it into law. The vote came exactly three months after the end of a 16-day government shutdown in October that was waged over disputed funding of "Obamacare," the president's signature health care law.


Congress easily passes $1.1T spending bill

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has easily passed a $1.1 trillion bill easing the harshest effects of last year's automatic spending cuts after tea party critics chastened by the government shutdown in October mounted only a faint protest.


Pentagon chief open to incentives to bolster nuclear force

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is willing to consider offering additional incentives to bolster America's nuclear missile force, the Pentagon said on Thursday, as an exam cheating scandal raises questions about trouble within its ranks. The Air Force on Wednesday disclosed that 34 nuclear missile officers were implicated in cheating on a key proficiency exam at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana. It was only the latest incident involving America's nuclear missile officers, some of whom are also wrapped up in a separate Air Force probe over illegal drug possession. The head of the ICBM force, Air Force Major General Michael Carey, was also fired in October for getting drunk and carousing with women while leading a government delegation to Moscow for talks on nuclear security.


Utah governor flooded with letters on gay marriage

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — More than 2,700 calls, emails and letters flooded the Utah governor's office in the days and weeks after a surprise ruling legalized gay marriage in the state.


Pages