Political News from Yahoo

Top Christie aides get subpoenas in New Jersey bridge probe

A New Jersey state Senate panel is likely to issue subpoenas next week in its investigation into traffic jams at the George Washington Bridge that were apparently politically motivated, a source said on Friday. Aides and allies of Christie were also among those targeted by a separate panel convened by the state Assembly, which issued 20 subpoenas seeking information on Thursday in its own investigation. The Senate panel will meet on Wednesday to vote on the subpoenas as it looks into the abrupt closing of access lanes to the bridge in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in seeming retribution aimed at the small city's Democratic mayor, who failed to endorse Governor Chris Christie's re-election bid last year, the source said. The bridge scandal surrounding the Republican governor, who is thought to be weighing a bid for the White House in 2016, broke open last week with the public release of emails showing a top Christie aide, Bridget Anne Kelly, appearing to order up traffic problems in Fort Lee.


Kerry: Assad must accept peace conference terms

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State John Kerry is warning that Syria's government must accept the goal of an upcoming peace conference in achieving a political transition there.

'Unruffled' and 'Confident' Chris Christie Addresses Bridge Scandal at Fundraiser

MOUNTAIN LAKES, N.J.–New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addressed the ongoing lanes closure scandal at a fundraiser Thursday evening for his one-time rival Steve Lonegan, and attendees said the embattled governor seemed unfazed by the controversy. Lonegan, a former candidate for Senate now running for a...


AP Source: NSA phone data control to come to end

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Friday will call for ending the government's control of phone data from millions of Americans, a senior administration official said. The move marks a significant change to the National Security Agency's controversial bulk phone record collection program.


AP Source: NSA phone data control may come to end

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Friday will call for ending the government's control of phone data from millions of Americans, a senior administration official said. The move marks a significant change to the National Security Agency's controversial bulk phone record collection program.


Exclusive: Obama to announce overhaul to controversial NSA program

By Steve Holland and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama will announce on Friday a major overhaul of a controversial National Security Agency program that collects vast amounts of basic telephone call data on foreigners and Americans, a senior Obama administration official said. In an 11 a.m. (1600 GMT) speech at the Justice Department, Obama will say he is ordering a transition that will significantly change the handling of what is known as the telephone "metadata" program from the way the NSA currently handles it. Obama's move is aimed at restoring Americans' confidence in U.S. intelligence practices and caps months of reviews by the White House in the wake of damaging disclosures about U.S. surveillance tactics from former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden. In a nod to privacy advocates, Obama will say he has decided that the government should not hold the bulk telephone metadata, a decision that could frustrate some intelligence officials.


British Cuisine Is Back!

Who's afraid of English food? Not us—not anymore. These days, British chefs are looking to their storied past to create some of Europe's most inventive (and delicious) food.


Who’s Watching Your Nukes?

Cheating amid those guarding our nuclear arsenal may sound terrible, but an ex-‘missileer’ and a secret study suggests it’s a symptom of a strategic weapon that’s become irrelevant.


When ‘Sovereign Citizens’ Snap

Police came to evict Mark Kulis—and found a home wired to explode. It’s the latest incident for a movement that rejects the government, with members who have been turning to violence.


Why Conservatives Hate Light Bulbs

You’ll have to pry incandescents out of their cold, dead hands. How one little-noticed new budget provision keeps alive the most ridiculous element of Republicans’ culture war.


An Art Tour Turned Seduction

When cosmetics magnate Stanley Picker died in 1982, he left behind a gorgeous house and notable art collection. Elizabeth Price's documentary invites viewers to come in and explore.


Recruiting For Big Brother

The surveillance state sold itself to hackers as the coolest place to work. Now it’s seen as the enemy, and that means going elsewhere to build an army of digital cat burglars.


How to Save South Sudan

South Sudan is sliding toward full-scale civil war but there is a way for peace talks to succeed and salvage the world’s newest nation.


Britain’s Art-World Wunderkind

Edgy, brilliant, and a little bit dangerous, Joshua Compston shook up London’s art scene in the 90s, championing the YBA’s and revitalizing Hoxton and Shoreditch, before he died at 25.


What’re We Really ‘Looking’ For?

The makers of ‘Looking’ and TV critics sound off on the expectation that HBO’s new ‘gay show’ represents the expectations of every gay man.


Snapchatting with Rand Paul

I Snapchatted with Senator Rand Paul. Is this the future of elected official-constituent communications? Doubtful.


The Making of ‘Mitt’

‘Mitt’ offers a behind-the-scenes look at Romney’s failed campaigns. But what does the documentary tell us about the man who could have been president?


Confide: Snapchat for Grownups

If you’re a professional who needs to communicate without a paper trail, Confide is for you—at least until gets it hacked or bought by a big, privacy-invading tech firm.


Foreign Policy Faceplant

It was a tough week for Shlemiel of State John Kerry, who was topped by a dwarfish North Korean baller and made one Kremlin princess very, very unhappy.


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