Political News from Yahoo

Obama, Abe under pressure to salvage signature Pacific trade pact

By Linda Sieg and Krista Hughes TOKYO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman arrived in Japan earlier than expected on Wednesday, Japanese media said, for a last ditch push for a two-way deal seen as crucial to efforts to create one of the world's biggest trade pacts. Froman, who had been expected to arrive in Tokyo with U.S. President Barack Obama later in the day, was likely to meet Japanese Economy Minister Akira Amari, the reports said. Talks have been snagged largely on Japan's insistence on protecting politically powerful farm sectors such as beef. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told parliament the talks were tough but Japan was trying to keep some tariffs.


Republicans in NC's Senate race trade few hits

DAVIDSON, N.C. (AP) — The candidate in North Carolina's Republican Senate primary with backing from the party's Washington establishment came under little direct criticism Tuesday night as his top rivals had their first real chance to challenge him face to face.


Lawmakers trying to restrict solitary confinement

DENVER (AP) — A year after a Colorado inmate held in solitary confinement allegedly gunned down the state prisons chief upon being released, lawmakers are moving to restrict use of the punishment for the mentally ill.


Pentagon chief headed to Mexico, Guatemala

Pentagon chief Chuck Hagel will depart Wednesday for Mexico City to hold talks with his counterparts from Canada and Mexico aimed at bolstering Washington's security ties to its neighbors. Hagel's three-day trip to Mexico and Guatemala will underline "America's commitment to this region," spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby told reporters. The visit follows a Pentagon announcement for a planned sale of 18 Apache helicopters to Mexico. Kirby said the helicopters would "improve the security of a strong, strategic partner in Mexico, both in terms of combating organized crime and drug trafficking."


US clears Egypt for some military assistance

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration said Tuesday it has certified that Egypt is upholding its 35-year-old peace treaty with Israel and therefore qualifies for some military and counterterrorism assistance.

The Chelsea Clinton Birthers

She’s not really pregnant. No, she’s having a baby but only to help her mother win the White House in 2016! For crackpots, the Clinton baby news is just the latest Clinton conspiracy.


Australia to buy 58 US F-35s for $11.6bn

Australia will purchase 58 more F-35 Joint Strike Fighters at a cost of Aus$12.4 billion ($11.6 billion), the government said. The new aircraft will bring Australia's total JSF force to 72 aircraft, with the first due to arrive in Australia in 2018 and enter service in 2020. "The F-35 will provide a major boost to the Australian Defence Force's intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities," Prime Minister Tony Abbott said in a statement released late Tuesday. The deal is in addition to 14 F-35s Australia already approved in 2009.


Sen. Rand Paul says school choice could expand GOP

CHICAGO (AP) — Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said voters in perennial Democratic strongholds such as Chicago and Milwaukee will think differently if they see Republicans not just visiting these places, but discussing issues pertinent to their circumstances.


AP source: Egypt cleared for some US military aid

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration has certified that Egypt is upholding its 35-year-old peace treaty with Israel and therefore qualifies for some military and counterterrorism assistance, The Associated Press has learned.

Colorado lawmakers move to tighten edible marijuana laws

By Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - Colorado lawmakers are moving to tighten laws governing the sale of marijuana-infused edibles, an issue that has gained attention following two deaths possibly linked to the ingestion of cannabis products, the measures' main sponsor said on Tuesday. The state House of Representatives this week unanimously passed a bill limiting the amount of concentrated marijuana that can be sold, and another bill requiring more specific labeling of pot-laced products, such as candies and baked goods. Rep. Frank McNulty, a Republican from suburban Denver, said the measures are needed to protect the public and assure that edibles are not mistakenly consumed by children. "The packages of edibles are labeled that they contain marijuana, but once they're out of the package, they're indistinguishable from a brownie or lollipop bought at a grocery store," he said.


New Jersey panel orders testimony on traffic jams

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey legislative committee is ordering current and former aides to Gov. Chris Christie and two officials at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to testify in its probe on politically motivated traffic jams last year near the George Washington Bridge.

Obama congratulates US winner of Boston Marathon

OSO, Wash. (AP) — President Barack Obama has congratulated Meb Keflezighi (kehf-LEHZH'-gee) on becoming the first American man in 31 years to win the Boston Marathon.


Obama views mudslide scene, mourns with survivors

OSO, Wash. (AP) — Swooping over a terrain of great sadness and death, President Barack Obama took an aerial tour Tuesday of the place where more than three dozen people perished in a mudslide last month, then mourned privately with those who lost loved ones in the destruction.


The Court Was Right on Race

The Supreme Court let states ban race as a factor in college admissions. That’s a good first step toward race-blind education that can focus on root problems.


Moscow’s War on Social Media

The CEO of Europe’s second-largest social network was sacked this week as the Putin regime’s campaign to silence its internal critics went into overdrive.


Top US court wrestles with TV, copyright and 'cloud'

A powerful coalition of the broadcast and cable TV industries asked the panel to rule against the startup Aereo, which allows customers to rent a tiny Internet-linked antenna to watch or record over-the-air broadcasts, raising difficult copyright questions. A similarly strong alliance that includes several technology firms and consumer groups is pressing for a different outcome, saying a ruling for Aereo would send a signal in favor of technological innovation. Justices appeared ambivalent at times, questioning whether Aereo was violating copyright law and mulling a possible impact on the burgeoning cloud computing sector, which stores all kinds of materials online. Justice Stephen Breyer queried what might happen if Aereo were found to be in violation.


States can ignore race in university admissions: US top court

The US Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that states can disregard race as a factor in university admissions, in a fresh blow to a legacy of the 1960s civil rights movement. The 6-2 ruling upheld the constitutionality of a measure passed by referendum in Michigan that disallowed so-called affirmative action in college admissions. Effectively favoring voter initiatives over the courts, the decision was expected to have repercussions far beyond Michigan -- governors of Arizona, Alabama, Georgia, Oklahoma and West Virginia had supported Michigan's appeal. The ruling was the latest to chip away at a practice used to promote racial and ethnic diversity of university student bodies while countering the effects of racial discrimination.


Jimmy Carter urges US, China leadership on climate

Former US president Jimmy Carter on Tuesday urged his country and China, two of the world's biggest fossil fuel polluters, to take the lead on halting climate change. If the two economic and political giants could agree on a way forward, the rest of the world would likely follow their lead, the statesman told AFP on the sidelines of a climate change discussion with students at the Paris Institute of Political Science. He said he had encouraged Chinese President Xi Jinping along these lines, and has had discussions with US Secretary of State John Kerry. Carter took part in the Paris meeting on Earth Day as a representative of The Elders, a grouping of global leaders brought together by Nelson Mandela in 2007 to promote peace, justice and human rights.


Do not hurt Russian people with sanctions: Jimmy Carter

Former US president Jimmy Carter said Tuesday the West should not impose sanctions that would hurt the Russian people over their leaders' actions in Ukraine. "So far, we have limited the sanctions to the leadership of Russia, and I think that is the proper approach," the Nobel peace laureate told AFP on the sidelines of a discussion in Paris on climate change. US Vice President Joe Biden earlier warned Russia of "more costs" and "greater isolation" if it continued to "pull Ukraine apart". Carter, who is credited with brokering the 1978 Cape David peace accords between Egypt and Israel and establishing US diplomatic relations with China, said Russia's takeover of Crimea had been "inevitable".


GOP: Ukraine Is Obama’s New Syria

Bob Corker, the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, sees disturbing parallels between the Obama administration's current policy in Ukraine and what he sees as its failures in Syria.


Pages