National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Tottenham signs Seattle's Yedlin to 4-year deal

TUKWILA, Wash. (AP) U.S. national team defender DeAndre Yedlin signed a four-year deal with Tottenham on Wednesday but will remain in the United States with the Seattle Sounders through the remainder of the MLS season and potentially into 2015.

Both clubs announced the deal after Yedlin spent last weekend in London visiting with Spurs officials and the sides were able to finalize the deal. Tottenham said Yedlin would join the club ahead of the 2015-16 season, but Seattle general manager Adrian Hanauer said the window for the move is still unknown.

Hanauer said Yedlin could make the move during the January transfer window depending on where Tottenham stands. Or the move could come next summer and Yedlin could remain with the Sounders a little longer.

"We didn't put the full-court press on DeAndre staying," Hanauer said. "We weighed all the different factors, the benefits to our club, what DeAndre wanted, what the market was telling us out there in terms of the size of the transfer fee and ultimately made the decision based on that group of factors. We thought it was ultimately a good decision for our club, although a difficult one."

Yedlin made his international debut this year and impressed when he came in for injured right back Fabian Johnson in the second-round loss to Belgium. He was immediately linked with clubs throughout Europe and Hanauer said there were a number of serious offers.

But Tottenham eventually became his destination. The 21-year-old was the first MLS homegrown player to appear in the World Cup and has been an MLS all-star selection each of his first two years in the league. The first inkling of Tottenham's interest came in July when the Spurs were in Seattle for an exhibition with the Sounders as part of their preseason North American tour.

Yedlin could join Seattle teammate Clint Dempsey and goalkeepers Kasey Keller and Brad Friedel as Americans who have played for Tottenham. However, he may not be eligible for a British work permit. The rules of the British Home Office state a player must have appeared in 75 percent of his nation's competitive international matches over the previous two years, and American forward Juan Agudelo was turned down when Stoke applied for a permit last year.

"DeAndre clearly wanted this transaction to occur as well and we want to do right by our players as well as our club," Hanauer said.

NBA schedule sends LeBron to Miami for Christmas

NEW YORK (AP) LeBron James will play his first game since rejoining the Cleveland Cavaliers at home Oct. 30 against New York, then return to Miami for the first time on Christmas.

The NBA regular season will open Oct. 28, with the NBA champion San Antonio Spurs hosting the Dallas Mavericks in one of the three games that night.

The league released its schedule, featuring a lengthened All-Star break, on Wednesday night during an NBA TV special, with James' return to his original NBA team putting the Cavaliers in a number of prime positions.

That includes the game at Miami in the third spot on the five-game Christmas schedule, traditionally a highlight of the NBA season. James led the Heat to two championships and four NBA Finals appearances in four years before deciding to return to his native Ohio.

The other Christmas day games are: Washington at New York; Oklahoma City at San Antonio in a rematch of the Western Conference finals; the Los Angeles Lakers at Chicago; and Golden State at the Los Angeles Clippers.

The nightcap is a rematch of a testy Christmas night matchup from last season that featured multiple ejections. The Clippers then went on to beat the Warriors in seven games in the first round of the playoffs.

The last game before the All-Star break in New York is Feb. 12, when the Cavaliers visit the Bulls. The regular season doesn't resume until the following Thursday, two days later than usual, with a doubleheader on TNT.

The three-game opening night closes with Houston visiting the Lakers, which should feature Kobe Bryant's return from an injury-shortened 2013-14 season. Derrick Rose's first regular-season action since season-ending knee surgery early last season should come the next night, when Chicago visits the Knicks on the first full night of action.

Other items of note:

-A 12-game Martin Luther King Jr. Day, four televised nationally, is highlighted by another Cleveland-Chicago matchup.

-The NBA Finals rematches between the Spurs and Heat are scheduled for Feb. 6 in San Antonio and March 31 in Miami.

-If a Kevin Love trade to Cleveland is completed, his return to Minnesota would be Jan. 31.

-James' first game in San Antonio since his final one in a Miami uniform is March 12.

-Pau Gasol heads back to Los Angeles for the first time since leaving the Lakers for Chicago on Jan. 29.

-Jason Kidd's first visit to Brooklyn since leaving the Nets to coach Milwaukee is Nov. 19.

-International games scheduled for Mexico City (Houston-Minnesota on Nov. 12) and London (New York-Milwaukee on Jan. 15).

-TNT will televise 53 regular-season games, including an opening night doubleheader and 19 Thursday night doubleheaders, along with the Feb. 13-15 All-Star festivities.

-ESPN has 75 games in the regular season and ABC will show 15. NBA TV will televise 97 games.

The regular season ends April 15.

Lester leads Athletics, stops Royals' run at 8

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) Jon Lester pitched six strong innings and Josh Donaldson homered twice and drove in four runs as the Oakland Athletics beat Kansas City 11-3 Tuesday night, snapping the Royals' eight-game losing streak.

Lester (13-7) has won all three of his start since the A's acquired him in July 31 trade for All-Star outfielder Yoenis Cespedes. Lester struck out nine and allowed three runs on six hits and two walks.

The Royals have won 11 of 13 with both losses to Lester, who is 9-3 with a 1.84 ERA in 13 career starts against Kansas City.

Donaldson homered in the seventh and eighth off left-hander Bruce Chen for his third multi-homer game of the season.

Royals starter Jeremy Guthrie (8-10) allowed six runs on 11 hits in 4 2-3 innings.

Cowboys CB Scandrick apologizes after 4-game ban

OXNARD, Calif. (AP) Dallas cornerback Orlando Scandrick blamed his positive drug test that led to a four-game suspension for violating the NFL's policy on performance-enhancing drugs on a recreational drug he took in Mexico that he didn't know contained an amphetamine.

Scandrick took the blame for the error Tuesday and apologized to his family, teammates and organization for the mistake that will force him to miss the first month of the season.

"It was just a bad decision," he said. "I should have never done it. I didn't do it with the intent of knowing it would test positive. I know we get random tests, but I don't take anything to enhance my performance. I wasn't taking anything to enhance my performance."

Scandrick tested positive in April but appealed the penalty. The suspension was upheld Monday and the league officially announced the suspension on Tuesday.

Scandrick apologized to his teammates Monday night and said he appreciated the support he got from them.

"We're here for each other," Scandrick said. "I just let them know that I was sorry and that if they can learn anything from this, it's you need to do all the right things even when no one is looking or you don't think anyone is looking."

Cowboys owner Jerry Jones praised Scandrick for the way he owned up to the mistake and said he will be welcomed back after the suspension.

"The most important thing to him is letting us all down and he recognizes that," Jones said. "As a person, he's one of the best people we've had on the Dallas Cowboys. He made a mistake."

Scandrick's agent, Ron Slavin, says he believes that if testing for human growth hormone was in place that Scandrick would have been subjected to the substance abuse policy and been warned instead of receiving a suspension for performance-enhancing drugs.

"More than 80 missed games, millions of dollars in fines and bonus repayments have been issued because the NFLPA and NFL cannot come to an agreement," Slavin said in a statement. "The only people who are losing in this standoff are the players and fans."

This is just the latest hit to a defense that allowed the most yards in the NFL last season. Linebacker Sean Lee is out for the season after tearing a left knee ligament in the offseason, defensive end Anthony Spencer is still working his way back from knee surgery and franchise career sack leader DeMarcus Ware was released in March.

The Cowboys have known for some time that Scandrick was facing the ban and coach Jason Garrett said the team will miss Scandrick's versatility as an outside and slot cornerback and his leadership.

"He brings a great spirit to our team," Garrett said. "He plays the right way. Not to have him for the first four games will impact us. Like with an injury it's the kind of situation that provides an opportunity. We have some young corners who are going to vie for his role in the early part of the season."

Scandrick, who is going into his seventh season, became a starter last year when former top 10 pick Morris Claiborne struggled. Now Claiborne is battling tendinitis in his right knee and missed the preseason opener for the third time in his three seasons in Dallas.

Brandon Carr, the other starter, missed the first two weeks of camp to be with his mother in the final days of her battle against breast cancer. He might only play one preseason game, but is expected to be ready for the regular season.

Carr and Claiborne are expected to start on the outside with Sterling Moore, B.W. Webb and rookie Terrance Mitchell expected to get looks as the slot cornerback in nickel formations.

"It's definitely big shoes to fill," Moore said. "He's one of the premier inside corners in this league. I'm definitely going to come to him for some advice and tips that he has. He's played there for a long time. But it's next man up and they expect no drop-off."

The Cowboys acquired cornerback Justin Green from New England on Tuesday in a deal for defensive tackle Ben Bass.

Scandrick will be eligible to participate in exhibition games, but will miss the first four games of the regular season. He can return after Dallas' game against New Orleans on Sept. 28.

Garrett said he will try to get Scandrick as much work as possible before the end of the exhibition season to make sure he is not too rusty when he returns. But the Cowboys also need to make sure that the other cornerbacks get enough practice time to be ready for the start of the season.

NOTES: Jones said Spencer is ahead of where the team expected he would be at this time and might not need to start the season on the physically unable to perform list. ... The Cowboys signed OL Stephen Goodin and waived OL Andre Cureton. ... Dallas also signed P Tom Hornsey.

Broncos linebacker Trevathan out 6-8 weeks

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) Denver Broncos leading tackler Danny Trevathan is out six to eight weeks after fracturing his left knee during a particularly intense padded practice Tuesday.

The Broncos said their weakside linebacker has what's called a medial tibial impaction fracture but, fortunately, no torn ligaments.

"Well, we were hoping it was a bruise. That would have been the best news," coach John Fox said after the team's evening walk-through. "But obviously, that's better than ligament damage. Those are out-for-the-season types of things. So, at some point we will get him back."

Trevathan, who didn't put any weight on his left leg after being carted off the field during team drills, is expected to return to the Broncos right around their bye week in late September, meaning he'd only miss three regular season games, at most.

He was hurt on an 11-on-11 run play in which center Will Montgomery rolled over him.

Trevathan, a sixth-round draft choice out of Kentucky in 2012, is coming off a breakout season in which he led the Broncos with 124 tackles and intercepted three passes before leading the team with two dozen tackles in the playoffs.

"You just hate it," Peyton Manning said while Trevathan was being examined by the team's medical staff. "You hate it in a game when you see that. And you hate it out here in practice. So, our prayers are with Danny. We're praying for positive results and hopefully he's OK. He's an important part of our football team."

The Broncos were hoping for a repeat of what happened last October, when Trevathan was carted off with a scary knee injury only to return to practice that week after his MRI came back negative.

"It's pretty scary. He got carted off last year, so I'm like, `OK, he'll be good,"' said Trevathan's backup, Brandon Marshall. "But you never know how these things go. The defense was kind of like, `Man, that's our guy, that's one of the playmakers on our team.' So, we all got a little worried, but we're just hoping he'll be OK."

Before Trevathan was diagnosed with a fracture, Fox said, "Obviously, we hope for the best. And if not, it'll be next man up."

That's Marshall, an undrafted third-year pro from Nevada who spent most of last season on Denver's practice squad before being promoted to the active roster and playing in the regular season finale and all three playoff games.

"I guess it was like a redshirt year, so to speak. I know they don't have those in the NFL, but I feel like it was for me," Marshall said. "And I feel good. On special teams I feel good, on defense I feel good."

Marshall has already been playing alongside Trevathan in the nickel defense, a role that rookie Lamin Barrow, a fifth-round draft choice from LSU, will assume.

Asked if he felt good about the linebacker depth, which also includes rookie Corey Nelson, Fox said, "Well, time will tell. I think in this league, it's all about opportunity, so we'll see what they do."

What makes this injury difficult is that Trevathan is an every-down player.

"He's obviously a vital part of our defense, but not too many people heard of Danny a couple of years ago, and you never know what might happen.

Marshall said he's certain the coaching staff would allow him to make the defensive calls just as Trevathan for any time that he's filling in.

"I know I can do it," Marshall said. "We only have smart linebackers on this team."

About an hour before he got hurt, Trevathan was involved in one of three skirmishes in a four-play sequence during a four-minute drill. Finally, Fox called his players together and told them to quit losing their cool.

The Broncos added several defensive players through free agency this offseason to give them more of an edge, but the offense wasn't backing down any.

"If we're going to get hit, we might as well deliver the blow," said rookie running back Brennan Clay, who was at the center of a scuffle that spilled into the defensive sideline.

Manning said he's no fan of fisticuffs at training camp because fights in games only hurt your team.

"The thing about this game is it's controlled violence. At times, that's hard to control your violence," wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders said. "It's good to see a team that's physical. Physicality is everything. That's what the Seattle Seahawks had last year when they won the Super Bowl.

"But it's bad because at the end of the day we're a team. So, you don't want guys hitting each other and trying to knock guys out or hurt guys out here."

Twitter campaign backfires on Florida St, Winston

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) - A Florida State social media campaign turned ugly Sunday when the university's athletic department opened their Heisman-winning quarterback up to nationwide mockery.

The department attempted to engage fans on Twitter by soliciting questions to be used for a video on the team website.

The hashtag "(hash)AskJameis" became a trending topic on Twitter for a time Sunday - for all the wrong reasons.

The Twitter feed was bombarded by accounts making fun of Winston and taking shots at the sophomore. Winston has been heavily criticized for several off-the-field incidents during his time at Florida State.

He was investigated in an alleged sexual assault of a female student last season, but was never charged. Winston was suspended from the baseball team for three games and ordered to perform 20 hours of community service after being cited for stealing $32 of crab legs from a local grocery store. There were also other minor run-ins with authorities, but no arrests.

The Twitterverse quickly went on the attack.

"I knew there was going to be some negativity going into it," said Elliott Finebloom, FSU sports information director. "The goal of the Twitter Q&A was to continue to find ways to connect our fans and the players they support. That's important to us ... and social is a big way of doing it these days.

"That was the ultimate goal."

The tweets covered a wide range from witty to malicious. Most were aimed at Winston, but others questioned why the university would risk this type of response.

One post read: "Do you know that you have to Buy One to get One Free at Publix?"

Another read: "Who gave you better protection last year - your offensive line or the TPD?"

TPD is shorthand for the Tallahassee Police Department.

"This was doomed from the beginning," said Robert Stewart, director of the Ohio University school of journalism. "It's basically a setup. Whoever thought this was a good idea had not done P.R. 101, which is to think about what all could go wrong. Everything about this was naive."

Winston has grown accustomed to the chatter.

He was relentlessly heckled at away games during the baseball season. Hundreds of online memes were generated after the crab legs incident. Winston said during Florida State's football media day on Sunday that he doesn't focus on the negative things, but has become more guarded.

Florida State still plans to run the video of Winston answering questions. And a large number of people had to be turned away from a winding line hoping for an autograph from Winston during Fan Day on Sunday.

"There is definitely a group of people that" are looking to attack Winston, Finebloom said. "He's done such a good job of reaching our fan base in so many different ways. You'd hate to not be able to continue to make sure people knew about how many good things he does."

Experts said universities and businesses need to have a thoughtful conversation and consider researching ideas before soliciting social media feedback - especially when the subject has been mired in controversy.

McDonald's had a hashtag campaign in 2012 titled "(hash)McDStories" that turned into a string of jokes made at its expense.

The vitriol was directed at NCAA President Mark Emmert in April when he made an appearance on ESPN's "Mike & Mike."

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was the punching bag during a (hash)AskCommish campaign in May.

The Washington Redskins asked supporters to tweet their "(hash)RedskinsPride" in May and were awash with posts from opponents of the team nickname.

Stewart said a differently worded hashtag that limited the scope to football in Winston's case may have helped, but the open-ended nature gave "people dynamite and asking if they can help you light the fuse."

Niklas Myhr, social media professor at Chapman University, said group thought can easily snowball on social media. He explained that it's easy to be involved in casual bullying with thousands of others on the sites.

"There's always going to be haters out there, there's always going to be people that are negative," Myhr said. "If you leave it up to them to be the first responders in a case, they can have a bigger impact than they deserve and make it easier for others to follow."

Finebloom said people learn from everything that happens.

"And social media, it has its plusses and minuses," he said. "And we know that. ... There are hundreds of thousands of Seminoles fans that interact with us in a positive way and we're going to keep interacting with them positively, too."

NBA: Sale of Clippers to Ballmer now official

The sale of the Los Angeles Clippers to ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is now official, the NBA announced on Tuesday.

“I am humbled and honored to be the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers,” Ballmer said in a released statement. “Clipper fans are so amazing. They have remained fiercely loyal to our franchise through some extraordinary times. I will be hard core in giving the team,our great coach, staff and players the support they need to do their best work on the court”

In a statement, the league said:

"The transaction in which Steve Ballmer purchased the Los Angeles Clippers closed today following the entry of an order by a California court confirming the authority of Shelly Sterling, on behalf of the Sterling Family Trust, to sell the team.

"The NBA Board of Governors previously approved the sale and Ballmer is now the Clippers Governor."

NBA commissioner Adam Silver ordered the removal of Donald Sterling as Clippers owner following the late April release of audio clips detailing Sterling making racist remarks. Sterling was also banned for life from the NBA, and fined $2.5 million. In May, Sterling vowed to fight the league on its forced sale, but it was announced that the team had been sold to Ballmer for $2 billion in an agreement reached with Shelly Sterling, wife of Donald.

Sterling continued to appeal the NBA's decision prior to the sale going official on Tuesday.

The Clippers responded simply on Twitter:

#ItsANewDay

— Los Angeles Clippers (@LAClippers) August 12, 2014

Stay with NBCSports.com for updates.

Ward crafted reputation as wheelman before death

PORT LEYDEN, N.Y. (AP) Kevin Ward Jr. was crafting a reputation as a wheelman, the kind of driver who could race vehicles on any track without fear.

He'd sit up on his seat, floor it, and zip his way through a maze of cars straight toward the front of the pack.

For points. For fun. Often for little money.

"He would go to tracks that a lot of other drivers wouldn't go to," Chuck Miller, the race director and president for the Empire Super Sprints circuit, said Monday. "If we had co-sanctioned races with other organizations where we really weren't giving points or anything, but it was a deal where you wanted to see how you stacked up against the other competition, the Wards were willing to go and do that and see where they were at."

Ward began racing go-karts in 1998 at age 4. In 2010, he moved on to sprint cars and was Empire Super Sprint racing rookie of the year in 2012. The 20-year-old raced mostly on dirt tracks a few hours from his home in Port Leyden, a village of 700 in northern New York.

Ward was killed Saturday night about 140 miles away at a clay track in Canandaigua. NASCAR champion Tony Stewart was the big name in the field, racing with the young guys while he was in the area for a Sprint Cup race at Watkins Glen the next day.

Ward and Stewart tangled, and Ward hit the wall. Ward walked on the track apparently to confront Stewart, and was struck when Stewart's vehicle seemed to fishtail.

On Monday, several cars were parked in front of the Ward home in Port Leyden. A police officer stood across the street, politely asking reporters not to park on the road's shoulder.

Helen McHale has lived across the street for 30 years and remembers hearing the noise when Ward raced go-carts. Kevin Ward Sr. runs a successful painting business, and locals thought his son might make it big in the racing world.

"His dad goes to every race," she said. "He's a good kid, polite, big smile, and they're a good family."

Stewart and Ward shared a love of racing sprint cars: high-powered, winged cars built for running on short oval or circular dirt and paved tracks. Drivers have to hit the gas to turn, not necessarily use the wheel.

After the crash, Ward was standing to the right of Stewart's familiar No. 14 car on the dimly lit track. According to video and witness accounts, Ward was struck by the right rear tire and hurtled through the air.

Authorities questioned the 43-year-old Stewart once on Saturday night and went to Watkins Glen to talk to him again Sunday. Ontario County Sheriff Philip Povero said that investigators don't have any evidence at this point to support criminal intent. Povero said Monday there were no plans "at this time" to talk to Stewart again.

"At this time, there are no facts that exist that support any criminal behavior or conduct, or that any probable cause of a criminal act, in this investigation," he said.

Povero said the autopsy was completed Monday and found Ward died of blunt force trauma.

Stewart said Sunday "there aren't words" to describe his sadness over Ward's death.

Stewart hasn't announced whether he'll drive in this weekend's NASCAR race at Michigan International Speedway, but his short track "hobby" is on hold. He won't appear Saturday in a race in Warsaw, Indiana.

"It is still an emotional time for all involved, Tony included. He is grieving, and grief doesn't have a timetable," spokesman Mike Arning said Monday.

Canandaigua Speedway promoter Jeremie Corcoran said the track has canceled Wednesday's event to give "my family, staff, fans, and racing teams time to grieve and process all that has occurred."

Driver Matt Tanner, a friend of Ward's, was a few cars back from the collision. Ward had been a good friend for years, a member of a small, tight group of drivers who traveled to various races around New York state, parts of Canada and Pennsylvania.

"I saw his car sitting there and when the ambulances pulled up I realized what was happening," Tanner said.

He hasn't watched the video and doesn't plan to.

"Your emotions are running so high. Stewart's known for being competitive, and Kevin was just as competitive," said Tanner.

So competitive that he'd take his life into his own hands by stepping into traffic in a black firesuit on a dark track?

No one will know for sure why Ward made the treacherous decision to stalk Stewart.

But perhaps he was inspired by Stewart himself. Known for his volcanic temper, Stewart is among the drivers who made highlight reels by tossing helmets at windshields or throwing punches at competitors. The action captivates fans and is part of NASCAR's allure - and inspires the next generation to mimic the bumping and brawling of their heroes.

What better way for a young driver to make a name for himself than being the one that stood up to Smoke?

Driver Cory Sparks, a fellow driver in Saturday's race, said he and Ward became friends five years ago. He said Ward was aggressive and competitive and that the two men had "had our feuds" but that he was proud to call him a friend.

"I don't want Kevin Ward to be remembered as a victim in a Tony Stewart accident," he said. "He definitely had a future in this sport. He was a very aggressive driver. He was one hell of wheel man."

Doug Elkins is a former race announcer who now writes about the sport. He had known Ward and his father for several years. Elkins said he expected rules prohibiting drivers from getting out of their cars during races will be better enforced around the country.

He hadn't heard of any bad blood between Stewart and Ward.

"Anyone would want to beat him, Elkins said, "he's Tony Stewart."

Memorial services will be held Wednesday at the Trainor Funeral Home in Boonville, New York. The funeral is Thursday.

Orioles 3B Machado leaves with right knee sprain

BALTIMORE (AP) Orioles third baseman Manny Machado sprained his right knee taking a swing Monday night against the New York Yankees and needed help to get off the field.

Batting in the third inning, Machado twisted his knee while hitting a broken-bat grounder to shortstop. He dropped in a heap in the batter's box and gripped his knee in obvious pain as Derek Jeter made the throw to first base.

After a check by head trainer Richie Bancells, Machado limped off the field on the shoulders of Bancells and Baltimore manager Buck Showalter.

An examination determined the injury to be a right knee sprain. The Orioles said Machado would be examined again on Tuesday.

Earlier in the game, Machado doubled and scored on a sacrifice fly. Chris Davis took Machado's place in the lineup and hit a two-run homer in the fifth.

Machado missed the first month of the season while recovering from surgery on his left knee.

NCAA seeks clarification in O'Bannon ruling

The NCAA wants clarification on two points in a California judge's ruling in the landmark Ed O'Bannon case.

The governing body wrote in a brief to the U.S. District Court on Monday that schools want to know which recruits are covered under the ruling which opened the door to athletes receiving a small percentage of the millions of dollars they help generate.

Judge Claudia Wilken wrote it would affect only athletes who enroll after July 1, 2016, at the beginning of the next recruiting cycles.

The NCAA calls the language about the "next recruiting cycle" ambiguous. It wants the court to establish another date, Aug. 1, 2015, when scholarships can first be offered in the 2015-16 recruiting cycle.

"Under existing NCAA rules, student-athletes in the next recruiting cycle (i.e., student-athletes who would first enroll in college in Fall 2016) may receive offer letters from colleges starting on August 1, 2015. Bylaw 13.9.2.2. NCAA seeks to confirm that the existing NCAA rules can remain in force until August 1, 2015, although we understand the injunction would not permit the NCAA to adopt or enforce rules inconsistent with the injunction on or after that date," attorneys wrote in the filing, pointing out that is the first day schools can offer scholarships to players in the 2016-17 recruiting class.

On a second point, the NCAA contends, is Wilken's language regarding the "licensing or use of prospective, current, or former student-athletes" could be interpreted to apply to current players.

"This has prompted concerns among colleges and universities that the injunction might, contrary to the Court's opinion, apply immediately to current student-athletes," the attorneys wrote. "Based on the Court's opinion, the NCAA believes the language of Paragraph 1 refers to compensation only for student-athletes first enrolling after July 1, 2016. Otherwise the injunction would permit colleges and conferences to compensate current student-athletes before the NCAA's member colleges have an opportunity to consider new rules consistent with the injunction."

Attorneys wrote that they want the clarifications to ensure that there are no violations of the permanent injunction Wilken imposed, which allows players at big schools to have money generated by television contracts put into a trust fund to pay them when they leave. Wilken said the body that governs college athletics could set a cap on the money paid to athletes, as long as it allows at least $5,000 per athlete per year of competition. Individual schools could offer less money, she said, but only if they don't unlawfully conspire among themselves to set those amounts.

NCAA President Mark Emmert said Sunday that the governing body would appeal "at least in part" the ruling.

"We look forward to presenting our arguments on appeal, and in the meantime we will continue to champion student-athlete success on the field and in the classroom," NCAA chief legal officer Donald Remy said in a statement released after Emmert's announcement.

Winning on appeal could be a major challenge given the venue in Oakland, California.

Though the NCAA has a stronger historical record in appeals courts, where a recent University of Illinois study found that it wins 71 percent of the time in both the second and third rounds of cases, this would go to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Legal experts say that court has generally been a "labor-friendly" court, which could hurt the NCAA's chances of victory.

Wiggins deflects questions about trade to Wolves

TORONTO (AP) When training camp begins in October, he'll be trying to block and deflect shots in the NBA. On Monday, No.1 overall draft pick Andrew Wiggins was deflecting questions about precisely where he'll be playing.

Last week, Cleveland reportedly reached an agreement in principle to send Wiggins, Anthony Bennett and a first-round pick to Minnesota for All-Star forward Kevin Love, who will join LeBron James and Kyrie Irving to form a new "Big 3" with the Cavaliers.

That deal, which cannot be officially completed until Aug. 23, when Wiggins becomes eligible to be traded, would leave the rookie swingman playing for a rebuilding squad in the Western Conference, rather than alongside LeBron on a presumed title contender in Cleveland.

Speaking publicly for the first time since the reported deal was agreed to, Wiggins refused to be drawn in to any trade talk.

"Whatever happens is out of my control," he said. "I'm not worrying about it right now."

Surrounded by more than a dozen reporters and nine television cameras at a promotional event at his former grade school in suburban Toronto, Wiggins acknowledged that life as a first overall pick has brought him extra attention.

"There's more eyes on me, more criticizing, stuff like that," he said.

So far, at least, the glare of the spotlight hasn't been too hard to handle.

"Going to Kansas University kind of prepares you for moments like this," he said, "because at Kansas they treat the basketball players like rock stars."

After Wiggins attended Jayhawks coach Bill Self's basketball camp Sunday, Self said Wiggins told him he'd welcome the trade to Minnesota, where he could be the face of the franchise, rather than playing in the shadow of LeBron.

"Even though in a weird way everybody would love the opportunity to play with LeBron because you're guaranteed winning, for the longevity of his career, he needs to develop that mindset to be the guy, for him to be great, and I think being Minnesota will help him do that," Self said Sunday.

Wiggins wouldn't bite when asked Monday for a response to Self's comments.

"Anywhere, any team," he said. "I can play anywhere."

Wiggins, who set numerous freshman records during his lone season with the Jayhawks, appears to be a good fit for the Timberwolves. While his defense is already NBA-caliber, Wiggins will be able to develop his offense alongside point guard Ricky Rubio in an up-tempo system.

The reported trade would break up Cleveland's trio of Canadian youngsters, with only fourth-year forward Tristan Thompson expected to remain with the Eastern Conference's new presumed power.

Wiggins said he's kept in touch with both Bennett and Thompson as the NBA rumor mill churned this summer.

"We're all close friends," Wiggins said. "We're all from Toronto so I talk to them."

No matter where he starts his career, Toronto fans are already hoping that Wiggins might one day suit up for the Raptors. The young forward refused to say much about that, either, but didn't shoot down the idea.

"The hometown love will always be there, no matter what," Wiggins said. "I try and do good for this city and I know this city tries to do good for me."

On that front, Wiggins was asked how he'd cast a ballot in Toronto's October mayoral vote, where controversial candidate Rob Ford, an acknowledged crack user who recently returned to work following a stint in rehab, is running for re-election. Even there, however, the basketball star refused to be pinned down.

"Not too sure," Wiggins said with a chuckle.

Pirates put McCutchen on DL, dating to last week

PITTSBURGH (AP) The Pittsburgh Pirates have put star center fielder Andrew McCutchen on the 15-day disabled list because of a broken rib after waiting a week to see how it would heal.

The Pirates promoted right-hander Casey Sadler from Triple-A Indianapolis before Monday's game against the Detroit Tigers.

McCutchen's move was listed as Aug. 4, the day after he left a game at Arizona with pain in his side following a swing. The previous day, he was hit in the same area by a pitch from Diamondbacks reliever Randal Delgado.

The Pirates felt McCutchen was hit in retaliation for Arizona All-Star first baseman Paul Goldschmidt sustaining a season-ending broken left hand a night earlier when hit by Pittsburgh reliever Ernesto Frieri.

McCutchen is batting .311 with 17 home runs and 67 RBIs this season. The reigning NL MVP leads the playoff-contending Pirates in batting average, on-base percentage, homers and RBIs.

Massive blunt trauma caused Ward's death

Kevin Ward Jr. died of blunt force trauma when he was hit by a car driven by NASCAR star Tony Stewart.

Ontario County Sheriff Philip Povero says the autopsy was completed Monday. The 20-year-old driver was competing in a dirt-track race in upstate New York.

Authorities questioned Stewart on Saturday night and went to Watkins Glen to talk to him again Sunday. Povero said Monday there were no plans "at this time" to talk to him again.

There is no timetable to complete the investigation.

Povero says there is nothing in the inquiry that supports criminal conduct or probable cause. He says there was no camera in Stewart's car.

LA Kings to retire Rob Blake's No. 4 jersey

LOS ANGELES (AP) The Los Angeles Kings will retire Hall of Fame defenseman Rob Blake's No. 4 jersey on Jan. 17.

The Stanley Cup champions announced the honor Monday.

Blake played 14 of his 20 NHL seasons with the Kings, including six seasons as their captain. The seven-time All-Star won the franchise's first Norris Trophy in 1998 and became the club leader in games played, goals and assists by a defenseman.

The former fourth-round draft pick finished his career in San Jose in a move that irked many Kings fans. He has since returned to Los Angeles as the club's assistant general manager.

Blake will be honored before a home game against the Anaheim Ducks. He is the sixth Kings player to have his number retired.

Police looking at Lynch in assault investigation

BELLEVUE, Wash. (AP) Police in Bellevue, Washington, are investigating whether Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch was involved in an assault and damage of personal property.

The Bellevue Police Department released a statement Monday morning saying that the alleged incident took place around 2:30 a.m. Sunday and that Lynch is alleged to have been involved. Bellevue police stated that they have not been able to verify whether Lynch was involved, but are investigating.

The incident was reported by the female victim about 12 hours after it took place at a downtown Bellevue apartment. Police say there was no domestic violence or sexual assault involved in the allegation.

Bellevue police spokesman Seth Tyler told ( http://tinyurl.com/ov6ead8 ) The Seattle Times there was no further information, adding "this is only an allegation. We haven't even verified that he was involved."

Tyler said authorities will discuss the matter with Lynch as soon as they can.

The Seahawks did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Lynch held out the first week of Seattle's training camp before returning after the team agreed to turn $1.5 million in incentives and future pay into base salary for the 2014 season. That raised his base salary for this year from $5 million to $6.5 million.

Former No. 1 overall pick Oden charged with battery

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Prosecutors in Indiana have formally charged former NBA No. 1 draft pick Greg Oden with battery for allegedly punching his ex-girlfriend in the face during a fight.

The free-agent center was charged Monday with felony battery resulting in serious bodily injury, misdemeanor domestic battery and misdemeanor battery resulting in serious bodily injury.

The 26-year-old was arrested at his mother's suburban home in Lawrence, Indiana, on Thursday and released later that day from jail. An affidavit says a witness told police Oden had punched the woman in the face, drawing blood.

The Associated Press left a phone message seeking comment with Oden's attorney.

The Portland Trail Blazers made Oden the top pick in the 2007 draft. He played for the Miami Heat last season.

McIlroy wins PGA in thrilling show on soggy turf

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Rory McIlroy stood over a 10-inch putt in gathering darkness to win the PGA Championship as flashes from thousands of camera lit up Valhalla like a rock concert.

Everyone wanted to capture a moment from golf's latest coronation.

In his biggest test, McIlroy played his best golf Sunday to win his second straight major and establish himself as golf's next star.

And what a stage.

The final major was pure theater with an All-Star cast - Phil Mickelson, Rickie Fowler, Henrik Stenson all with a share of the lead on the back nine. The final two hours were filled with eagles and birdies, with tension and chaos.

McIlroy never had to sweat so much to win one of golf's biggest events. And that's what made this major so much sweeter.

"It is the most satisfying," McIlroy said. "To win it in this fashion and this style, it means a lot. It means that I know that I can do it. I know that I can come from behind. I know that I can mix it up with the best players in the world down the stretch in a major and come out on top."

The final par - the easiest shot he faced all day - gave McIlroy a 3-under 68 to outlast Mickelson by a stroke and beat the darkness that threatened to spoil this show. He became only the fourth player in the last century to win four majors at 25 or younger. The others were Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus and Bobby Jones, three of the game's greatest players.

Boy Wonder appears on his way to belonging in that group.

"I didn't think in my wildest dreams I'd have a summer like this," said McIlroy, only the seventh player to win the last two majors of the year. "I played the best golf of my life. I really gutted it out today."

He finished at 16-under 268, the lowest score to win the PGA in 13 years.

But one of the greatest shows on soggy turf came with a most peculiar ending.

Three shots behind as he stood in the 10th fairway, McIlroy got back in the game with a 3-wood from 281 yards into 7 feet for eagle. He took the outright lead when all three of his challengers eventually made bogey, and finally gave himself some breathing room. With a 9-iron from a fairway bunker to 10 feet for birdie on the 17th, he took a two-shot lead going to the par-5 closing hole.

Because of a two-hour rain delay earlier, darkness was falling quickly and it wasn't certain McIlroy would be able to finish.

McIlroy was allowed to hit his tee shot before Mickelson and Fowler had reached their drives. Both were only two shots behind, still in the game. McIlroy came within a yard of hitting in a hazard right of the fairway.

Then, the PGA of America allowed McIlroy to hit his second shot. Mickelson and Fowler had to stand to the side of the green.

"We were cool with hitting the tee shot," Fowler said. "We weren't expecting the approach shots."

Fowler had a 50-foot eagle attempt to tie for the lead. He was well off the mark, and missed the short birdie putt attempt that cost him his third straight runner-up finish in a major. Mickelson was short of the green, and his chip came within inches of dropping for an eagle that would have tied him for the lead.

Mickelson appeared upset that they had to wait to finish the hole - not standard procedure in a PGA Tour event - and he made two references in a TV interview that this is the only championship the PGA of America runs all year.

"It didn't affect the outcome of the championship at all, I don't think," Mickelson said. "It's not what we normally do. It's not a big deal either way."

Mickelson closed with a 66 and was runner-up for the ninth time in a major.

Fowler became the first player in history to finish in the top five at all four majors without winning one. He closed with a 68 and tied for third with Stenson, who fell out of a share of the lead by missing a 3-foot par putt on the 14th hole. Stenson shot a 66.

McIlroy hit his second shot into a bunker, and he had to two-putt from 35 feet for the win. He lagged the first one to tap-in range, and the major was his. McIlroy repeatedly pumped his fist before letting out a scream above the gallery that had been treated to a Sunday it won't soon forget.

McIlroy won his first two majors by eight shots at the 2011 U.S. Open and 2012 PGA Championship. Only a month ago, McIlroy took a six-shot lead into the final round of the British Open and completed a wire-to-wire win with only a brief scare.

This was different.

"I think I showed a lot of guts out there to get the job done," he said.

It might not have been possible without a 3-wood on the par-5 10th hole. McIlroy watched Fowler make a 30-foot birdie putt ahead of him for the outright lead and knew it was time to get going. He hit his 3-wood lower than he wanted, and further to the left than he wanted, but it turned out perfect.

Once he joined the leaders with a birdie on the 13th, none of the contenders made another birdie the rest of the way until it was too late.

All that was left after an exhausting day of raw emotions was for McIlroy to summon enough energy to hoist the 27-pound Wanamaker Trophy. He crouched before the presentation, trying to collect his thoughts at the last month. Not since Woods in 2008 has anyone won three straight tournaments, and they were big ones - the British Open, a World Golf Championship and the PGA Championship. He played them in a combined 48-under par.

"He's better than everyone else right now," Mickelson said.

Lochte beats Phelps in 200 IM at US nationals

IRVINE, Calif. (AP) Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps, a couple of Olympic champions on the comeback trail, got a step closer to finding their form.

Lochte beat Phelps to win the 200-meter individual medley at the U.S. national championships Sunday night, leaving Phelps winless in four races at his biggest meet since coming out of retirement.

They weren't in their usual lanes in the center of the pool. Those spots go to the fastest qualifiers.

Lochte was in lane two and Phelps was in lane six. They couldn't see each other either, with Phelps breathing toward the stands and Lochte the other way.

Still, the race came down to the two old rivals, with Phelps chasing Lochte for a change.

Lochte, the world champion, led all the way and touched in 1 minute, 56.50 seconds. He is coming off major knee surgery, and had a setback at a meet in April, all of which limited his time in the water.

"This year has been up and down, but I'm glad I got a win knowing that I really haven't done the work I wanted to," he said. "I always relied on my training, but this year I haven't done that training so my confidence was low."

Phelps, the three-time Olympic champion in the event, was saying the same thing, although he pronounced himself pleased with his time.

"That's a good spot to be," he said after finishing second in 1:56.55. "I'm a lot happier with finishing like that than having some of the sub-par performances that I've had throughout the final sessions in this meet."

Lochte's time was second-fastest in the world this year; Phelps' was third-quickest.

"If you go out in that race it's pretty painful in the end," Phelps said.

It was Lochte's first victory of the five-day meet after finishing second in the 100 freestyle and third in the 200 backstroke.

"I guess we can say this is kind of our off-year," Lochte said of him and Phelps. "Well, I can say that."

Four months into his comeback, Phelps came up empty. He finished second in the 100 butterfly, sixth in the 100 back and seventh in the 100 free. But those second places were enough to qualify him for the Pan Pacific Championships this month, where swimmers can compete in any events they want.

"I'd rather lose all the national championships that I swim in as long as I'm ready for the big races," he said.

Olympian Tyler Clary was third in 1:57.94.

Lochte and Clary are headed to Australia for Pan Pacs, too.

Lochte took the medals stand in glitzy green high-tops with attachable wings.

"I kind of like the wings," he said. "They're helping me out. I should have worn them all week."

Anthony Ervin won his first 50 freestyle national title in 13 years, upsetting five-time champion and training partner Nathan Adrian.

"Unexpected," Ervin said. "I still feel like I haven't let that fully sink in."

Ervin, at 33 the oldest man in the final, won the chaotic sprint in 21.55 seconds, third-quickest in the world. The 2000 Olympic champion in the event raised both tattoo-sleeved arms in triumph.

"I've been doing the no-breath since 2000," he said, smiling.

Adrian took second in 21.69, and two-time champion Cullen Jones was third in 21.83.

Simone Manuel won the women's 50 free in 24.56 to go with her second-place finish in the 100 free.

Natalie Coughlin, at 31 the oldest woman competing at nationals, finished sixth. She failed to make her record-tying fifth Pan Pacific team and as a result won't qualify for next year's world championships. That leaves Coughlin out of the two biggest international meets leading up to the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Michael McBroom won the 800 free in 7:49.66.

Melanie Margalis won the 200 individual medley in 2:10.20 to earn a berth at her first major international meet.

Swimming on the far outside in lane eight, Katy Campbell won the 1,500 freestyle in 16:17.59 after world record-holder Katie Ledecky decided not to swim on the meet's final night. Ledecky set a world record in the 400 freestyle on Saturday, giving her world marks in the 400, 800 and 1,500 at the same time.

Stewart on Ward death: 'there aren't words'

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. (AP) Tony Stewart says "there aren't words" to describe his sadness over the collision that killed Kevin Ward Jr.

In a statement released by spokesman Mike Arning, Stewart says "my thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends and everyone affected by this tragedy."

The three-time NASCAR champion struck and killed Kevin Ward Jr. with his car on Saturday night as Ward walked toward it following contact between the two during their race at Canandaigua Motorsports Park.

The full text of the statement read: "There aren't words to describe the sadness I feel about the accident that took the life of Kevin Ward Jr. It's a very emotional time for all involved, and it is the reason I've decided not to participate in today's race at Watkins Glen. My thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends and everyone affected by this tragedy."

Stewart's team had said earlier Sunday that Stewart would be behind the wheel of his No. 14 Chevrolet when the green flag waved. Regan Smith drove Stewart's car instead.

Emmert says NCAA will appeal O'Bannon ruling

Mark Emmert said Sunday that the NCAA will appeal a ruling that opens the door for college athletes to receive some of the money they help generate in major sports.

In the NCAA president's first public comments since Friday's ruling, Emmert told ABC's "This Week With George Stephanopoulos" that college sports' largest governing body found a lot in the decision that was "admirable" and some parts they disagreed with so strongly that they could not let it go unchallenged in court.

"Yes, at least in part we will," Emmert said when asked whether the NCAA planned an appeal. "No one on our legal team or the college conferences' legal teams think this is a violation of antitrust laws and we need to get that settled in the courts."

The NCAA's decision to challenge the ruling is hardly a surprise.

Donald Remy, the organization's chief legal officer, had repeatedly said that if the NCAA lost, it would appeal the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court if needed. Many legal experts think this case could be heading that direction, though it's unclear whether the nation's highest court would take it.

"We remain confident that the NCAA has not violated the antitrust laws and intend to appeal," Remy said in a statement released following the television show. "We will also be seeking clarity from the district court on some details of its ruling.""

Joseph Farelli, an attorney with the New York-based law firm of Pitta & Giblin who specializes in labor law, said the NCAA didn't have a choice after U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken on Friday shot down the NCAA's argument that its model of amateurism was the only way to run college sports. Wilken wrote that football players in FBS schools and Division I men's basketball players must be allowed to receive at least $5,000 a year for rights to their names, images and likenesses, money that would be put in a trust fund and given to them when they leave school.

"I would expect them to appeal it because now you're going to have a permanent injunction that says the NCAA can't regulate what colleges do with their student-athletes," Farelli told The Associated Press. "If they don't appeal, now you have a federal court precedent."

If the NCAA allowed that decision to stand, Farelli said, it could lead to even more litigation against the NCAA on hot-button topics such as Title IX and whether there should be any cap on how much money athletes should receive.

Emmert acknowledged Sunday that Wilken's decision could lead to a fundamental shift in college sports.

Historically, the NCAA fares better in the appellate system. According to a study released last month by Illinois professor Michael LeRoy, student-athletes suing the NCAA won 49 percent of the initial cases but the NCAA won 71 percent of the appeals in both the second and third rounds.

This time could be different because of the venue.

"The problem for the NCAA is that the appeal will be in the Ninth Circuit, and the Ninth Circuit is generally a labor-friendly circuit. Looking from the outside, it would likely favor O'Bannon," said Michael McCann, director of the sports and entertainment law center at the University of New Hampshire School of Law. "It depends on which judges get the case and we won't know that."

Emmert did applaud parts of the decision that allow the NCAA to enforce other rules and the imposition of the cap.

But by the time the payments are supposed to begin in 2016, the NCAA could be operating under new rules.

The board of directors voted Thursday to give the five richest conferences more authority to unilaterally change some of the rules, a move that paves the way for giving players enough money to defray all or most of their college expenses including those that go beyond current limit of tuition, room and board, books and fees.

"There's little debate about the need to do that," Emmert said, "and I think this move will finally allow us to get there."

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