National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Austin Dillon puts No. 3 on pole for Daytona 500

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) With the famed No. 3 on his car and memories of the late Dale Earnhardt fresh in his mind, Austin Dillon took the fabled number out of hibernation and straight to the top at Daytona.

Dillon reawakened the days of The Intimidator and proved he can handle the spotlight thrust on his ride in the 3, winning the pole Sunday for the season-opening Daytona 500.

He took the top spot with a lap at 196.019 mph in NASCAR's season opener in a car Richard Childress has refused to field at NASCAR's top level since Earnhardt's fatal accident on the last lap of the 2001 race.

But with his 23-year-old grandson ready to move to the Sprint Cup Series, Childress allowed Dillon to use the number widely associated with the seven-time champion. Earnhardt won 67 races, six championships and the 1998 Daytona 500 driving the No. 3.

Dillon was a kid when he posed for a picture with Earnhardt in Victory Lane following his breakthrough 1998 win.

He'll have many more memories from this milestone, like the congratulatory handshake he received from Richard Petty when qualifying ended.

NASCAR's family roots run deep, so Childress never had to leave the family tree to find the right driver for the number.

Dillon has been using it in NASCAR national competition since 2009, when he made his Truck Series debut in the No. 3. He won the Truck championship in 2011 driving the No. 3 for Richard Childress Racing, and the Nationwide title last season in the same number.

So Childress knew - he always knew and has insisted that Earnhardt gave his blessing long before his death - that Dillon could use the number if he ever made it to Cup.

Dillon doesn't take the responsibility lightly.

"Everybody wants to see this number perform well, and that's what my goals are," Dillon said. "I love getting in that race car and driving it. I think once we get through some of these races here at the beginning of the year, everything will sink in and I'll get comfortable and be able to have some fun."

It's the fourth time the No. 3 has won the pole for the Daytona 500. Buddy Baker did it in 1969, Ricky Rudd in 1983 and Earnhardt in 1996.

But this one was emotional all the way through RCR, which had its ups-and-downs in performance in the 13 years since Earnhardt's death. Now Dillon comes in at another changing of the guard, as Kevin Harvick, the driver who slid into Earnhardt's seat the week after his death, has moved to another team.

Engine builder Danny Lawrence, who made his debut with the company at the 1998 Daytona 500 with Earnhardt, said the company ran on adrenaline after Earnhardt's death. Dillon has now given the organization a shot in the arm.

"On the sentimental side, I was really pretty good about this 3 thing," Lawrence said. "But when I saw that car hit the race track today, it kind of tore me up a little bit. Austin is such a good guy, he has been great for our company."

Said Childress: "The energy that he brings to our whole organization is huge. He's been in the shop so long, him and his brother, Ty. I can remember Dale pushing them around on a creeper down there in the garage when they were just little babies, so that's how far they go back."

Martin Truex Jr., driving a Chevrolet for Furniture Row Racing, qualified second with a lap at 195.852 mph. Truex's engine is built by Earnhardt-Childress Racing, giving the company a sweep of the Daytona 500 front row.

"Obviously without that thing under the hood, we wouldn't be where we are," said Truex, who won the Daytona 500 pole in 2009 with an ECR engine when he drove for Earnhardt Ganassi Racing.

"Got a pretty good track record of qualifying here with an ECR engine under the hood, and obviously they're building some big power.

The rest of the field is set Thursday through a pair of qualifying races, but Childress and the ECR engines are strong: They had five cars in the top 12 on Sunday.

Childress knew he had a shot at the pole, if not with Dillon then from another one of his four Richard Childress Racing entries. All were fast in January testing, and again in two Saturday practice sessions.

But it was Hendrick Motorsports driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., the first driver to make his qualifying attempt, who set the pace early and held down the provisional pole for most of the session. RCR drivers Brian Scott and Paul Menard failed to bump Earnhardt, and it was surprisingly Ford driver Greg Biffle who finally did it as the 33rd driver to take his turn.

Ryan Newman then took his shot for RCR and missed, and Dillon was the next driver out. He and crew chief Gil Martin knew the spotlight was on the No. 3, and stayed focused on the task at hand, even as Childress seemed to be on pins and needles.

"You try to keep the blinders on," Dillon said of the pressure to win the pole. "For me, it was hitting those shifts, putting in a good line. The funny thing is, there is a build-up to it, and my grandfather, me and Gil said, `Calm down, you're nervous!' He said, `I'm not nervous. I'm concerned.'

"So now he doesn't have to be concerned. We're on the pole, and things can be a little bit calm."

Childress celebrated by pumping his fist in the air. He won't be so reserved next week, admitting if Dillon pulls off a win, he'll celebrate in a far different way.

"The 3 is special to all of us; the family, the Earnhardt family, to every one of us," he said. "But I think it's special because Austin, our family is in the car. The emotion will fly if the 3 rolls in there on Sunday. I won't hold it back, I promise."

Teixeira: 'We're back to being the Yankees again'

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) Mark Teixeira took swings from the right side of the plate and then the left, his first time batting outdoors since a wrist injury ended his 2013 season almost before it began.

He pronounced himself ready to return and gave what seemed like a warning to the rest of Major League Baseball. Last year was an aberration, when the New York Yankees missed the playoffs for only the second time in 19 years. In his mind, an offseason spending spree transformed Murmurers' Row back into Murderers' Row.

"You look at our lineup, we're back to being the Yankees again," he said Sunday. "Last year we weren't the Yankees."

Brian McCann, Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran were signed to fortify a batting order that dropped from a team-record 245 homers in 2012 to an un-Bronx Bomber-like 144 last year, the largest falloff in baseball history for a non-strike season. Teixeira was limited to 15 games and Derek Jeter to 17, and Alex Rodriguez and Curtis Granderson also missed long stretches.

After two days of canceled flights from New York, Teixeira started workouts four days ahead of the other position players. He fielded grounders at first base, took 53 swings off a tee and 43 more in batting practice in his first outdoor session since surgery last July 2 to repair a torn tendon sheath in his right wrist.

Jeter, still recovering from the effects of a broken ankle in October 2012, has been working out at the minor complex since Jan. 20. He reports to the big league camp Wednesday, when he will hold a news conference to discuss his announcement last week that this will be his final season.

With the Yankees weakened at second following the departure of Robinson Cano and at third because of Rodriguez's season-long suspension, New York is counting on Teixeira and Jeter to stabilize an infield in flux.

"They're back in my mind, but I think you have to get them into games to see exactly where they're at, to be fair to them and probably to alleviate any doubt that you might have," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said.

The retirement decision by Jeter, who turns 40 in June, shocked Teixeira.

"I thought that Derek had a couple years left in him. I knew how excited he would be about this season, just the same way I am when you only play 15 or 17 games," he said. "I really could have seen Derek playing until he was 44 or 45."

Teixeira turns 34 in April and hopes to have five more productive seasons. He might not be ready when New York's exhibition season starts Feb. 25, but he thinks he'll be on the field sometime during the first week, get 50 exhibition at-bats and be able to play at least 150 games during the regular season.

He had more pop from his bat during his 49 right-handed swings than his 47 from the left side - although he said he felt his swing path was a lot better from the left. Given his injury, sustained while hitting off a tee last March 5, his wrist stiffness likely is more of an issue hitting left-handed - when the right hand provides most of the power.

"You can definitely tell I had surgery. But I had ankle surgery 13 years ago and I could tell I had ankle surgery after 13 years," he said. "So, it's just something I'm going to have to make sure that I loosen up, and make sure I do all the proper rehab and strengthening exercises."

A two-time All-Star, Teixeira usually is a slow starter. He has a .278 career average and 341 homers, but through April 30 each year his average is just .238 with 33 home runs in 11 seasons. A poor April wouldn't necessarily mean he hasn't sufficiently healed.

"I can always use that ammo," Yankees hitting coach Kevin Long said. "So that's in our back pocket."

Teixeira said his surgeon, Dr. Keith Raskin of New York University School of Medicine, told him the wrist will continue to improve for a year after the operation. But there always will be worries of a setback until Teixeira proves to himself that the injury isn't a hindrance, that he regularly can clear Yankee Stadium's right-field wall with what broadcaster John Sterling calls a "Tex message."

"There's going to be a mental part of it. He's going to have to get over the hump," Long said.

Teixeira watched from his home in Connecticut as Yankees general manager Brian Cashman made his moves.

"I was texting Cash like every two weeks, telling him congrats on another signing and great offseason," he said. "I basically told him: You did your job, now it's time for us to do ours. So no excuses this year. We have a team that can compete for a world championship."

Teixeira says he hasn't been this eager for a season since he was a rookie with Texas in 2003. His bounce back could determine whether the Yankees rebound.

"I take (a) silver lining in everything, and for me this year off - basically a year off - was me realizing how lucky I am to play baseball, realizing how much I loved playing baseball," he said. "I did a lot of charity stuff this offseason and spent a bunch of time with my family, and I loved that time, but I'm a baseball player, and there's nothing cooler than playing baseball for a living. And taking that year off really made realize that I want to do it as long as I can."

NOTES: A day after looking tired during a slow-mile run, RHP Masahiro Tanaka was happier with Sunday's condition. "Today was short distance. No problem at all," he said through a translator and then smiled. ... RHP Yoshinori Tateyama, his arrival delayed by a visa issue, was expected to report Monday.

SOCHI: Weibrecht, Miller win silver, bronze medals in Super-G

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia -- Kjetil Jansrud won his audition for Norwegian idol at the Sochi Olympics.

In an Alpine event that Norway absolutely owns, Jansrud won a thrilling men's super-G race Sunday one week after earning bronze in downhill.

Norway's fourth straight super-G gold, and fifth in the past seven Winter Games, put the 28-year-old Jansrud in a proud Olympic tradition started by now-retired great Kjetil Andre Aamodt and extended by Aksel Lund Svindal, his more heralded teammate.

"He is absolutely an idol for young Norwegians today," the Scandinavian nation's prime minister, Erna Solberg, told reporters after watching Jansrud's victory. Pre-race favorite Svindal placed seventh in defense of his title.

Andrew Weibrecht charged late at Jansrud's time of 1 minute, 18.14 seconds to take a surprise silver, edging U.S. teammate Bode Miller and Jan Hudec of Canada into a tie for bronze.

Miller, 36, became the oldest ever Olympic Alpine medalist, surpassing the mark Aamodt set when he won the super-G at Turin in 2006 at age 34.

And with his sixth career Olympic medal, spread over 12 years, Miller took sole possession of second place on the all-time men's Alpine medal list, two behind Aamodt.

"It's big, insane," Jansrud said of Norway's dominance in super-G, a discipline that challenges racers to be fast and technically correct through a gate-setting they have never practiced. They are allowed a one-hour, early-morning course inspection.

"Somehow when you come to the Olympic Games, Norwegians are on the top of the podium and that is impossible to describe," he said. "It feels perfect so far."

Prime Minister Solberg said hosting the 1994 Lillehammer Olympic was a key point in developing Alpine racing in Norway, a land where cross-country skiing dominates.

Jansrud, who was eight when Aamodt took bronze in super-G at Lillehammer, singled out Miller as one of his own idols.

"He was already winning races when I was a little kid. He has been one of my heroes," Jansrud told The Associated Press. "He has had such an amazing career."

Miller, who started No. 13, took the lead with an exhilarating run, though he lost time going off line down the steep final slope after making the final jump.

"To be on the podium, it's a really big day for me," said Miller, who placed eighth in downhill and sixth in super-combined. "Emotionally, I had a lot riding on it. I'm super, super happy."

Miller let out his emotions, too, tearing up when he hugged wife, professional volleyball player Morgan Miller, after the race.

Jansrud started No. 21 and was 0.53 faster than Miller, whose time was matched by Hudec.

Still, No. 29 Weibrecht shook up the picture -- and made Jansrud's legs "like jelly" -- by being fastest on the upper half and racing into second, 0.30 back.

At these sunbathed Sochi Olympics, starting numbers above 22 have proved impossible to turn into medals on softening snow, and Weibrecht was in a bad mood the night before racing.

"I thought that 29 was kind of a death sentence in terms of having a good run," he said. "I consciously made a promise to myself that I wasn't going to let any of that affect my race."

Weibrecht peaked at the Olympics for the second time in an injury-ravaged career. Nicknamed "War Horse," the Lake Placid, N.Y., native has blown out each ankle and gone through surgeries on both shoulders since the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, where he got super-G bronze.

He lost his sponsorship from the U.S. ski team after a string of lackluster results, but that didn't make him any less of a threat in the eyes of the other skiers.

"With Andrew at the start, I was like, `There's a good chance he wins this run right now," said Miller, who took silver in the super-G at Vancouver.

The Americans shared the podium again Sunday. And, again, there was a Norwegian standing above them.

"I don't think we have any secrets," Norway men's Alpine coach Havard Tjorhom said. "Both (Lasse) Kjus and Aamodt have been a huge inspiration for both of our guys."

So, can new national hero Jansrud perhaps knock cross-country off Norway's newspaper back pages?

"I think we are not even close," Tjorhom said. "We just have to ski fast and, maybe, one day."

SOCHI: Davis, White set record, lead ice dancing qualifiers

SOCHI, Russia — Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White won the Olympic short dance Sunday and are now one performance away from a gold medal.

The reigning world champions earned an international personal best 78.89 points and lead 2010 gold medalists Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada by 2.56.

Virtue and Moir rebounded from a shaky performance in the team event with a much stronger showing. But Davis and White, skating last, have overtaken their training partners over the last four years, and it was no different Sunday.

"I told Charlie in the middle of the program I felt like I was in a dream," Davis said. "It is such a surreal experience."

The free dance is Monday, when Davis and White can become the first Americans to win Olympic gold in ice dancing.

A Russian team was in third, but it wasn't world bronze medalists Ekaterina Bobrova and Dmitri Soloviev. Elena Ilinykh and Nikita Katsalapov were 3.29 points behind Virtue and Moir.

France's Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat were fourth, just 0.26 out of the bronze position. Bobrova and Soloviev were fifth.

Davis and White's twizzles are at another speed from the rest of the field, and yet they spin across the ice in perfect unison. Skating to "My Fair Lady," they gaze at each other and into the crowd with an exuberant bliss.

"They fly," said their coach, Marina Zoueva, who also works with the Virtue and Moir. "And you can see at the same time where they are strong. And they are so light at the same time and so flowing. ... They really did the best this program can be done, with joy. Total joy."

When it was over, they held their embrace for a few extra seconds.

"We kept in the moment and neither of us was pushing it," White said. "We were out there enjoying each other's company. This was special for us."

The other American teams, Madison Chock and Evan Bates and siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani, were eighth and ninth.

Virtue had a bobble on a twizzle during the team short dance. On Sunday, their trademark crispness and vivacity were back as she and Moir performed to jazz standards from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. In his black bowtie and suspenders, Moir, ever the showman, smiled coyly from start to finish, eyebrow arched. Virtue's face beamed brighter than the sparkles on her flapper-style dance.

With the two still posed cheek to cheek just like the lyrics to the final song in their medley, Moir shouted out "Yes!" and pumped a fist. He whirled across the ice in celebration, then lifted Virtue into the air, burying his face in her shoulder.

"That was more like it," Moir said afterward.

Wall leads East to All-Star dunk triumph

NEW ORLEANS (AP) John Wall soared over his mascot, and the East stomped on the West in the slam dunk contest.

Wall's sensational slam finished off a clean sweep for the Washington star, Paul George and Terrence Ross in the contest's new battle format, helping the Eastern Conference earn a 2-2 tie against the West on All-Star Saturday night.

Answering Sacramento rookie Ben McLemore's dunk in which he leaped over Shaquille O'Neal seated in a king's throne, Wall took the ball from Wizards mascot G-Man, who held it above his head, then brought it down between his legs and slammed down a two-handed reverse dunk.

"It was only my second time doing it. My first time was on Thursday," Wall said. "So I just felt comfortable with myself and I knew it was a dunk that hasn't been done before."

Judges Dominique Wilkins, Magic Johnson and Julius Erving all gave the victory to Wall in his matchup, after picking George over Harrison Barnes, and defending champion Ross over Damian Lillard in the first dunk contest with three All-Stars since 1988.

San Antonio's Marco Belinelli won the 3-point contest, and Lillard and Utah rookie Trey Burke won the skills challenge for the West's two victories. Miami's Chris Bosh, Wilkins and WNBA star Swin Cash won the night's first event for the East, the shooting stars.

The league tried to jazz up All-Star Saturday for its return to New Orleans, with a number of tweaks to the format that weren't all positively received. Players were given an entire rack of money balls worth 2 points in the 3-point contest, which they could place at any of the five spots on the floor.

The skills challenge became a team relay format, but the biggest change was in the dunk contest, which was broken into two parts. The first was the freestyle portion, where the teams had 90 seconds to execute as many dunks as they could, before the three 1-on-1 matchups in the battle format.

The East had already clinched that part by winning the first two, but Wall made it a resounding shutout.

McLemore came out wearing a king's robe and trailed by O'Neal, who unveiled a "Shaq-Lemore" jersey. He made it over O'Neal's throne on his second attempt, and O'Neal presented him with a crown.

But moments later, Wall was the real king.

"The slam dunk has returned," said Erving, one of the NBA's most famed dunkers.

Before that, the new format was confusing to fans and the West players themselves, creating a largely silent crowd during their turn. The East had it all figured out, winning the first stage with a passing and dunking display straight out the Harlem Globetrotters, capped by a three-man dunk where Ross threw if off the backboard to Wall, who lobbed it off the overhead shot clock for George to race in and slam it down.

That was just a warm-up for the second round, when Ross, the event's defending champion from Toronto, started things off by edging Lillard with an assist on his dunk from rapper Drake.

Lillard was the first person to compete in three All-Star Saturday events, adding that to Friday's Rising Stars Challenge and Sunday's game to give him the most ambitious itinerary ever.

He started 2 for 2 by following Friday's victory by winning the skills challenge for the second straight year, he and Burke beating Michael Carter-Williams and Victor Oladipo by a tenth of a second.

But Lillard's run was stopped when Belinelli made his final three shots to finish with 19 points, edging him by one to advance to the finals from the West.

"I was happy to just be invited to all of them and be able to compete in them, and I wanted to win at least one. And I won the first one, and then I thought there would be some momentum to continue to try and win all three of them," Lillard said. "But I fell short in the 3-point contest, and as you all saw in the dunk contest, they kind of just outclassed us."

Bradley Beal had 21 points to win the East bracket, then made his final six shots in the finals to tie Belinelli and force a tiebreaker. Belinelli won it by making six straight shots at one point, sweeping his fourth rack.

"I was a little bit nervous at the beginning and I think that I shot like two airballs," Belinelli said.

"But in the end I was focused. I really cared about this trophy."

Bosh, Wilkins and Cash won their second straight shooting stars title, with Bosh making a pair of halfcourt shots.

"I keep asking Coach to let me shoot that shot in the game," Bosh said of Miami's Erik Spoelstra. "He won't let me do it yet, but I think that today will give him confidence if he was watching."

The conferences split $500,000 in winnings for charity.

No. 3 Florida rallies past No. 14 Kentucky 69-59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) Scottie Wilbekin scored 23 points including five critical free throws down the stretch as No. 3 Florida rallied for a tense 69-59 victory over No. 14 Kentucky on Saturday night in a marquee showdown of the Southeastern Conference's top two teams.

The Gators tied a school record with their 17th straight win, and their first at Rupp Arena since 2007.

Trailing 45-38 with 11:12 remaining, the veteran Gators (23-2, 2-0) didn't flinch and outscored the young Wildcats (19-6, 9-3) 31-14 after that by putting the ball in the hands of their best players such as Wilbekin, who got to the line and finished 11 of 12 including two technical free throws with 8:14 left.

Casey Prather scored 24 points on 8-of-9 shooting, while Patric Young added 10 with the help of two 3-point plays during a 13-3 spurt that put Florida ahead for good.

Andrew Harrison scored 20 points for Kentucky.

Hamlin wins exhibition Sprint Unlimited at Daytona

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) Denny Hamlin has won the exhibition Sprint Unlimited - a race that ended with only eight cars running to the checkered flag at Daytona International Speedway.

Half the 18-car field was knocked out of Saturday night's race during a nine-car accident during the second of three segments.

It was a bizarre kickoff to Speedweeks as Danica Patrick's race was ended when boyfriend Ricky Stenhouse Jr. slammed into her car during the melee, and the Chevrolet pace car later caught on fire.

A 75-lap race split over three segments, this version had a heavy fan involvement as sponsor Sprint allowed fans to vote for various aspects of the race. Among them was the starting order, how the segments were split and how the cars lined up in the final segment.

Silver delivers first press conference as NBA boss

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Adam Silver kept his focus on the game but hinted at some changes to the business during his first press conference as NBA commissioner.

From the look of the draft to the look of the uniforms, Silver touched on a number of topics during his remarks that ran about 40 minutes. He replaced David Stern on Feb. 1 and replaced Stern's old format Saturday, standing at a podium instead of sitting at a table.

Silver would like to raise the age limit but isn't sure there's need to change the lottery that precedes the draft. Expansion isn't a current priority - domestically or internationally - but lengthening the All-Star break might be considered.

"This is a fabulous league that has its best years still ahead of it," Silver said.

Among his ways to improve it:

-The draft: Silver said everywhere he goes that "people dislike so-called one and done," referring to the many players who go to college for just one year to meet the league's age minimum of being one year out of high school and 19 years old. He favors pushing the age minimum to 20.

"It is my belief that if players have an opportunity to mature as players and as people, for a longer amount of time before they come into the league, it will lead to a better league," he said. "And I know from a competitive standpoint that's something as I travel the league I increasingly hear from our coaches, especially, who feel that many of even the top players in the league could use more time to develop even as leaders as part of college programs."

-Tanking: "My understanding of tanking would be losing games on purpose, and there's absolutely no evidence that any team in the NBA has ever lost a single game," Silver said.

Nevertheless, he said the Competition Committee would examine the lottery system that gives teams with the worst records the best chance to win the No. 1 pick. "But I'm not overly concerned right now," he said.

-The length of the season: He likes the current 82 games, but will look at the idea of longer break at midseason. The league currently shuts down Friday-Monday for All-Star weekend.

"That's something I've heard directly from players on," Silver said. "They're saying that if they could get a few more days off around All-Star, especially the All-Stars, I think, who as we know are so busy over the course of these few days, it would be helpful to them to get some additional rest."

-The jerseys: "From a fan standpoint, the greatest indicator is how are they selling, and I'll say we're having trouble keeping them in stores," Silver said, referring to the somewhat-maligned sleeved jerseys that were worn on Christmas Day and will be again in Sunday's All-Star game.

But he said some players have complained, though not about them affecting their shooting, and said it was not the league's or outfitter Adidas' intention to change the core uniform. He also said the league is "not close at the moment" on sponsors on jerseys but he believes "ultimately it will happen in the NBA."

-Expansion: "It's not on the top of my list right now," Silver said, because he said all 30 teams weren't healthy financially now even after the league's gains during the 2011 lockout.

"My job is to ensure that 30 teams are healthy and competitive, and so that's what my priority is right now as opposed to expansion."

-The salary cap: Owners fought for a hard cap like the NFL in 2011, as opposed to the current NBA system that allows teams to exceed it through the use of certain exceptions. Sounds like that hasn't changed.

"I would like a harder system to distribute players better as opposed to the tax system we have in place now," Silver said.

No. 1 Syracuse beats NC State 56-55

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) Rakeem Christmas had a key steal to set up C.J. Fair's winning layup with 6.7 seconds left, helping No. 1 Syracuse edge North Carolina State 56-55 on Saturday night to remain unbeaten.

Christmas had 14 points, 12 rebounds and seven blocks as Syracuse earned its 10th single-digit win despite shooting 35.2 percent. Jerami Grant had 12 points and 14 rebounds and Fair scored 11 points on 5-of-16 shooting.

The start of the game was pushed back four hours because of a snowstorm that wreaked havoc along the eastern seaboard. N.C. State did not land in Syracuse until Saturday afternoon. The team's Twitter account announced the Wolfpack's arrival at 3:07 p.m., seven minutes later than the original scheduled tip-off.

It turns out it was worth the wait, with a tight game leading to a frantic finish full of missed opportunities.

Ralston Turner missed a 3 for N.C. State with 2:45 left, and then Fair was off on a hook driving across the lane. After N.C. State's Anthony Barber hit the side of the backboard with a baseline jumper, Grant missed a spinning drive in the lane for Syracuse.

Tyler Ennis then fouled Turner while shooting a 3, and he made three free throws to give the Wolfpack a 55-53 lead with 62 seconds left.

Fair sank 1 of 2 foul shots with 41.4 seconds remaining and N.C. State's Desmond Lee then lost the ball out of bounds when he was double-teamed at midcourt.

Ennis negated that turnover with a charge, but the Wolfpack couldn't close it out. After a timeout with 18.3 seconds to go, Christmas stole the ball and Fair put the Orange in front when N.C. State was whistled for goaltending on his layup attempt.

T.J. Warren missed from the top of the key on one last try for N.C. State.

Sam receives standing ovation at basketball game

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) Michael Sam received a standing ovation when he appeared on the arena video boards during Missouri's basketball game against Tennessee on Saturday.

The All-America defensive end who could became the first openly gay player in the NFL, later blew a kiss to the student section and shook hands with fans.

Sam and football team were honored at halftime for their Cotton Bowl over Oklahoma State.

Wearing a shirt declaring "We Are All CoMo Sexuals," 51-year-old Michelle Carmichael joined more than a thousand others in forming a line of support for Sam. She didn't hesitate to answer why.

"Because Michael Sam stood up for Mizzou his entire career and we need to stand up for him," she said.

The shirt plays off the nickname of Columbia, Mo., where Sam announced to his teammates in August that he was gay. The NFL hopeful shared his sexuality with the world last Sunday.

A Facebook event created this week called for the community to stand together for Sam outside Mizzou Arena on Saturday. Nearly 5,000 people said they would attend, though not as many turned out in the 30-degree chill.

Mason Schara, the student body president who posted Monday on Twitter that he's gay, said the university will always treat Sam as one of its own.

"The majority of us knew and we just didn't think anything of it because that's just who we are here," Schara said. "The fact that there's been such a positive reaction across the nation is what sparked us to be here today."

The fervor surrounding Sam's announcement quickly died down on campus after coach Gary Pinkel and athletic director Mike Alden said Monday that they supported the 6-foot-2, 255-pound player.

Sam also had not been seen publicly this week before joining teammates and Pinkel at the basketball game.

Supporters weren't concerned that Sam's draft status might drop because of his sexuality, saying he should be judged by his numbers on the field. Others expressed hope that Sam will inspire more athletes to feel comfortable in coming out, because there will always be people who support them.

"I am hopeful that the NFL won't care about something like this," Schara said. "It doesn't matter about his sexual orientation. He's a great player and everyone would be lucky to have him."

No. 8 Duke holds on to beat Maryland 69-67

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) Jabari Parker scored 23 points and No. 8 Duke held on to beat Maryland 69-67 on Saturday night.

Rodney Hood and Rasheed Sulaimon added 11 points each for the Blue Devils (20-5, 9-3 Atlantic Coast Conference). They started a run of four games in eight nights by giving the Terrapins a hard-to-swallow loss in their last scheduled visit to Cameron Indoor Stadium.

The ACC's top 3-point shooting team was just 5 of 24 from long range and shot 23 percent in the second half but found a way to reach the 20-win mark for the 18th straight year.

Jake Layman scored 18 points for Maryland (14-12, 6-7) and Dez Wells had all 17 of his points in the second half.

Charles Mitchell finished with 12 for the Terrapins, but missed two hook shots in the final 10 seconds that would have given them the lead.

Parker gave Duke the lead for good when his one-handed dunk over Jonathan Graham made it 68-67 with about 1:15 remaining.

Wells missed a jumper over Hood with about 50 seconds left. Duke milked the shot clock before Amile Jefferson missed a jumper that failed to draw iron, giving the Terrapins the ball.

The teams traded timeouts with 18.8 seconds left before Maryland worked the ball inside to Mitchell. He had one hook shot blocked by Parker with about 7 seconds left, and another bounced twice on the rim but would not fall through.

Jefferson grabbed the rebound, was fouled with 1.1 seconds left and hit a free throw to end the scoring.

Wells couldn't get off an 80-foot heave before the buzzer, sealing Duke's 30th straight victory at Cameron - tying Stephen F. Austin for the longest active streak in the country.

Duke missed 17 of its first 19 shots in the second half before Jefferson banked one in to tie it at 54 with 6 1/2 minutes left. That came about 2 minutes after Wells capped a 12-1 run with a layup that gave the Terrapins their first lead at 54-52, and it was a one-possession game the rest of the way.

The Big Ten-bound Terps got quite an early earful from the Cameron Crazies, who taunted coach Mark Turgeon with their classic "Sweat, Gary, Sweat" chant that had been mothballed since Gary Williams retired three years ago.

But once Maryland started chipping into - and eventually completely erasing - the Duke lead, those jeers stopped.

Jefferson finished with 12 rebounds for the Blue Devils, who have a busy upcoming week because their rivalry game with North Carolina was postponed due to a nasty winter storm.

That game was rescheduled for Feb. 20 - two nights after they visit Georgia Tech, and two nights before they host No. 1 Syracuse.

That they missed 11 of their first 13 attempts from 3-point range could have been attributed to rust for a team that entered hitting 3s at a league-best 42 percent clip.

But they also were outrebounded 43-36 by the Terps and looked ripe for an upset.

They were unable to take advantage of Maryland's drought early in the half, instead matching the Terps missed shot for missed shot. Maryland went 5 minutes between buckets early in the second half.

Duke finished at 33 percent from the field while Maryland shot 41.9 percent.

---

Follow Joedy McCreary on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joedyap

SOCHI: Davis' struggles continue as US speed skating rut deepens

SOCHI, Russia -- When U.S. Speedskating hooked up with Under Armour to develop a new high-tech skinsuit that would revolutionize the sport at the Winter Olympics, the vision was gold, silver and bronze.

The result was a total debacle.

Right in the middle of the Sochi Games, the American skaters hastily switched back to the suits they wore during the World Cup season and at the country's Olympic trials in late December.

Not that it mattered.

Saturday was another bust for the U.S. at the speedskating oval. Brian Hansen finished seventh in the 1,500 meters -- matching the team's best showing through seven events in Russia -- and two-time silver medalist Shani Davis faded to 11th in what might've been the final individual race of an otherwise brilliant Olympic career.

"Maybe we would see different results if we could turn back the hands of time," Davis said, "but we can't."

How did it come to this?

The embarrassment of Suitgate can be traced to a process filled with a quest for secrecy but marred by questionable decisions, all of which came back to bite the U.S. program on the sport's biggest stage.

Kevin Haley, senior vice president of innovation for Under Armour, laid out a timeline for The Associated Press that began in 2011 with the development of a new suit that was supposed to give the Americans a decided technological edge. The company worked with Lockheed Martin to handle some of the testing, a partnership that added a bit of intrigue to the process. The aerospace and defense giant analyzed the suits using a CGI-like procedure in which sensors are attached to the body, producing what Haley called "an unbelievable amount of data." From there, Under Armour began wind-testing variations of the new suit using six different-sized mannequins.

Understandably, the athletes were excited to see what would come of so many bright minds trying to make them a suit that would provide less resistance, enabling them to go faster than ever.

"These people make F-16 jets," skater Patrick Meek said.

According to Haley, Under Armour's deal with U.S. Speedskating called for three suits to be delivered to each Olympic skater on Jan. 1, which is where things started to go wrong.

Sure, the skaters were involved in the development all through the process: trying on the suit, using it in training, offering suggestions and feedback. But secrecy seemed to be the primary concern, the U.S. fretting that other countries would swipe their technology if the suit came out too soon. The final version was completed about six weeks before the opening ceremony, which meant no one had a chance to compete in it before they arrived in Sochi.

That, said Davis, was a huge mistake.

"The best thing would have been to make sure that these suits were what the people said they were," he said, "so that we can actually know going into the races instead of finding out in one of the biggest races of our lives."

The Americans gambled that any unfamiliarity and kinks in the new suit would be overcome by the startling times it produced.

That turned out to be a losing bet.

Big time.

While Under Armour touted the "Mach 39" as the "fastest speedskating suit in the world" -- and the skaters dutifully spouted the party line before the Olympics -- there were doubts about the suit all along. Some complained about it being too tight and restricting their breathing. The man who designed the Dutch team's new suits said he had already tried some elements in the American version and found they didn't produce any noticeable improvement; in fact, he thought one feature, a vent-like tab on the back, might actually slow a skater down.

After the first four events in Sochi, it was clear within the U.S. team that something was wrong, even though the Americans weren't necessarily expected to win a medal in any of those races.

For the men's 1,000 on Wednesday, one U.S. skater -- Haley wouldn't say who -- skated in a slightly different version of the new suit, essentially for testing purposes. There was no significant improvement in the time. Davis finished eighth, ending his bid to become the first male speedskater to win the same event three straight times.

On Thursday, when Heather Richardson and Brittany Bowe competed in the women's 1,000, an event they had dominated all season, more desperate measures were taken. The vent on the back of Richardson's suit was covered up. Again, there was no significant improvement, as Richardson finished seventh and Bowe eighth.

With no competition at the oval on Friday, the Americans decided enough was enough.

They received permission from the International Skating Union to go back to the Under Armour suit they used before the Mach 39.

It was a huge blow to U.S. Speedskating, maybe even worse for Under Armour after its grand claims.

"That's marketing. People wanted to make their product stand out," U.S. coach Matt Kooreman said. "And when you don't live up to that expectation, you get it thrown back at you pretty harshly."

The debacle was complete.

SOCHI: Antoine gives US first men's skeleton medal since '02

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia -- One year after a giant meteor streaked across Russia's sky, Alexander Tretiakov flashed by.

Accelerating down his home track lined from top to bottom with flag-waving, chanting countrymen, Tretiakov won the Olympic gold medal in men's skeleton on Saturday night, pulling away from the world's top sliders who were no match for his breakneck speed and precise driving.

Tretiakov completed four trips down the Sanki Sliding Center track in 3 minutes, 44.29 seconds, easily beating Latvia's Martins Dukurs (3:45.10), who settled for silver again after having gold slip from his hands four years ago in Vancouver.

Matt Antoine won the bronze, the first skeleton medal for an American man since Jimmy Shea's gold in 2002. John Daly of Smithtown, N.Y., entered the final run in fourth place, but slipped on the starting ramp and had his sled pop from the grooves. He dropped to 15th.

With cries of "Ro-ssi-ya, Ro-ssi-ya," echoing off the mountain and toward the ski resort area down below, Tretiakov won the host nation's fourth gold of the Sochi Games.

And with the performance Tretiakov, the bronze medalist in Vancouver, is set to receive a reward from the heavens.

On Feb. 15 last year, a meteroite zoomed over Russia's Ural Mountains, causing a sonic boom and exploding over the city of Chelyabinsk. A piece of the space rock was recovered by scientists, and fragments of that have been embedded in commemorative medals that a regional government is offering the winners of seven Olympic events staged on the anniversary.

Fitting for the "Russian Rocket."

"This is a very important medal, it's a real medal and I'm happy to win it for my country," Tretiakov said of his Olympic gold.

After two blistering runs on Friday, Tretiakov began the third heat with a 0.56-second lead over Dukurs, who had been reminded of his near miss for gold in Vancouver all week. Dukurs led after three runs in Whistler, but the two-time world champion was caught in the final heat by Canada's Jon Montgomery, another hometown favorite.

Skeleton's best slider for several years, Dukurs, who won six of eight World Cup events this season, had learned the hard way that no lead is safe, and nothing is guaranteed until the last man is across the finish line.

Tretiakov, though, wasn't slowing down for anyone.

Matching his start record (4.47) for the third consecutive heat, he completed his third run in 56.28 seconds, and as Dukurs waited for his turn to go he had to know deep down that the race was over.

Dukurs, who has won 24 of the past 28 World Cup events, managed to trim 0.02 seconds off Tretiakov's margin on his third run, but needing to make up more than a half-second on his last descent was asking way too much.

"I didn't like make up illusions that I will come here and win the gold," said Dukurs, who was trying to win Latvia's first gold at the Winter Games. "I was aiming for four good runs, and what comes out of that, we will see."

Daly and Antoine, good buddies and Olympic roommates, were separated by just 0.04 seconds after the third heat.

But Daly, perhaps feeling the pressure, was out of the medal picture just steps into his final run. His sled jumped from the grooves and skittered sideways. Daly was able to get his sled straightened out, but by the time he did, the bronze was long gone.

After stopping in the finish area, he buried his head in his hands.

"I knew I had to go for it, so I went for it and it bit me," he said. "The blame is totally on me."

Antoine, of Prairie du Chien, Wis., then put together a clean run, finishing in 56.73 seconds to beat Latvia's Tomass Dukurs, Martins' brother, for bronze.

"it's the greatest moment of my life, without a doubt," he said.

Daly and Antoine broke into the sport together, drawn to skeleton for its speed and danger after being inspired by Shea's storybook win in at the Salt Lake City Games.

As thrilled as he was by his medal, Antoine hurt for Daly.

"I didn't see it," he said. "But when I was walking up to the line, I heard all the groans. I knew something bad had happened. ... My heart really goes out to John for the way that ended for him."

SOCHI: Stoch wins Olympic double-gold in ski jumping

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia -- Ski jumper Kamil Stoch completed a gold medal sweep of the normal and large hills at the Sochi Olympics on Saturday despite a mistake on his final jump that nearly made 41-year-old Noriaki Kasai of Japan the oldest-ever Winter Games champion.

The Polish jumper joins Simon Ammann and Matti Nykanen as the only men to win both individual events at the same Winter Olympics.

Kasai took silver while Peter Prevc of Slovenia, who took silver in the normal hill, earned the bronze Saturday.

Jumping last in the first round after the trial round was canceled due to fluctuating winds, Stoch jumped 139 meters and totaled 143.4 points to give him a three-point lead over Kasai, a margin the Japanese veteran whittled down to 1.3 points after the final round.

"I did such a big mistake in the second round, I don't know how I jumped so far," Stoch said. "I was too aggressive. That's why I flew so far, but hey, what the heck? That's why I won."

Kasai, whose first Olympics was at Albertville, France in 1992, now has Olympic medals 20 years apart -- he won his first, a team silver with Japan in the large hill -- in 1994 at Lillehammer, Norway.

Kasai finished eighth in the normal hill last week, but said Saturday he should have done better.

"I took the medal that I didn't take in the normal hill," Kasai said. "Then I felt regret and now I feel happy."

Gregor Schierenzauer of Austria, who won bronze on both the normal and large hills four years ago, finished seventh.

Amman, the defending champion from 2010 -- he also won the normal hill that year in Vancouver -- had a chance to win a record fifth Olympic gold medal. But the 32-year-old Swiss jumper, who has said he will likely retire soon, never looked the part in training or on Saturday and finished 23rd.

"It's hard preparing for three years ... I have to take it easy for the rest of the season," Ammann said. "It's not the greatest feeling right now."

Thomas Morgenstern of Austria, who had a bad crash in early January and was touch-and-go to be fit for Sochi, failed to qualify among the 30 advancing to the final round, finishing in 40th place.

"I had a good feeling on the in-run and the takeoff, but it was strange, there was wind from the front and back," Morgenstern said. "Today I had no luck."

Three Americans who qualified for Saturday's final -- Nicholas Alexander of Brattleboro, Vt., Anders Johnson of Park City, Utah, and Nicholas Fairall of Andover, N.H., didn't make it to the second round. Fairall was 35th, Alexander 48th and Johnson was disqualified -- along with Canadian Matthew Rowley -- for suit violations.

The 7,500-capacity crowd didn't appear to mind waiting while the wind ribbon zipped sideways in alternate directions for a while, forcing the first round to start 15 minutes late. Men with Viking helmets, kids dressed up in bunny costumes and one optimistic local wearing a hat with three podiums -- all flying Russian flags -- added to the atmosphere.

The men return to action on Sunday with training rounds for the team event to be held Monday night. Austria is the defending champion.

SOCHI: Oshie scores four shootout goals as US tops Russia

SOCHI, Russia -- T.J. Oshie brainstormed while he skated to center ice, desperately trying to come up with one last move to end an epic shootout. He had already taken five shots at Sergei Bobrovsky, and the Russians were still even.

Yet Oshie was chosen for the U.S. men's hockey team with just such a situation in mind, and the shootout specialist concocted one last clever goal to silence an arena filled with screaming Russian fans.

Oshie scored four times in the shootout and put the winner between Bobrovsky's legs in the eighth round, leading the United States past Russia 3-2 Saturday in the thrilling revival of a classic Olympic hockey rivalry.

"I was just thinking of something else I could do, trying to keep him guessing," said Oshie, the St. Louis Blues forward. "Had to go back to the same move a couple times, but I was glad it ended when it did. I was running out of moves there."

International rules allow the same player to take multiple shots after the first three rounds of a shootout, and U.S. coach Dan Bylsma leaned on Oshie's array of slick shots and change-of-pace approaches to the net. Oshie scored on the Americans' first shot before taking the last five in a row, going 4 for 6 against Bobrovsky and disappointing a Bolshoy Ice Dome crowd including Russian President Vladimir Putin.

"I aged a couple of years in that shootout," Bylsma said. "We had other guys that are capable, but T.J. was the guy who was going well. It seemed like he was going to score every time he went."

Oshie's final shot was a beauty: He threaded a forehand right through Bobrovsky's pads, the puck punching the back of the Russian net emphatically enough to pop the water bottle on top into the air.

"At some point, you think, `Does he have any more moves left?'" U.S. captain Zach Parise said. "But he did a good job. ... That's hard to do, to get in a goalie's head and throw him off a little bit."

Oshie was among the final selections for the U.S. roster, and though the 27-year-old from Warroad, Minn., has never had a 20-goal NHL season, he leads American-born players with seven shootout goals this season.

The U.S. men are only interested in the one that all but wrapped up an automatic berth in the quarterfinals next week.

"I think you're going to see T.J. Oshie become a household name after that display he put on," said David Backes, Oshie's teammate in St. Louis. "The kids will be out on the pond probably in Minnesota right now, throwing a 5-hole on the goalie three or four times in a row."

Cam Fowler and Joe Pavelski scored in regulation for the Americans in the marquee game of the preliminary round. Jonathan Quick made 29 saves and stopped five attempts in the shootout as the U.S. improved to 2-0.

Captain Pavel Datsyuk scored two goals in regulation and another in the shootout for the Russians, who rallied from a third-period deficit in a fast-paced game. Russia also had an apparent goal waved off with 4:40 left because Quick's net came off its moorings.

"The U.S. team is a good team and a good test for us," Datsyuk said. "We played good, but the result is not good."

The shootout finish was entertaining, but the entire game was international hockey at its most compelling - and the third period was a thriller.

Pavelski scored the tiebreaking goal for the Americans on a power play with 10:33 to play, but Datsyuk tied it with 7:16 left during a Russian power play, spurring Putin out of his seat to cheer.

After review, the officials waved off Fedor Tyutin's apparent go-ahead goal because the net was loose, incensing the crowd. Russian coach Zinetula Bilyaletdinov and Alex Ovechkin both felt Quick had intentionally dislodged his net earlier in the sequence.

"I don't know what happened there, but definitely was a goal," Ovechkin said. "Nobody touched the net. Their goalie touched the net and put it out. But the referee has to see it and at least give him two minutes, you know?"

Quick claimed he didn't even realize the net had come unmoored.

"You need to catch some breaks to win games," he said.

Both teams had quality chances in overtime, but Bobrovsky denied Patrick Kane on a breakaway in the most hair-raising moment.

Oshie started off the shootout with a low shot between Bobrovsky's legs, and the next four shooters missed before Ilya Kovalchuk scored in the third round. Datsyuk and Kovalchuk scored in the fifth and sixth rounds, respectively, but Oshie tied it twice in dramatic fashion.

Datsyuk and Oshie both missed in the seventh, and Quick denied Kovalchuk again before Oshie ended it.

"It was a good game, very interesting," Pittsburgh Penguins star Evgeni Malkin said. "Two, I think, best teams played, and showed OK hockey. But shootouts is lucky."

The arena was packed to overflowing with fans of both nations jovially posing for photos and comparing their colorful sweaters. The Russians waved hundreds of flags, blew horns and banged drums from the first moments of warm-ups.

Although the game had little impact on the medal race in Sochi, the finish woke up the echoes of a U.S.-Russia rivalry best known for the "Miracle on Ice" at Lake Placid in 1980, when a team of American college students stunned the Soviet Olympic team.

The sociopolitical impact of that game is long gone, and the nations have already met three previous times in the Olympics since NHL players joined the games in 1998.

Drummond's 30-25 wins Rising Stars Challenge

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Andre Drummond grabbed everything in sight, even that MVP trophy that came apart.

Drummond had 30 points and a Rising Stars Challenge-record 25 rebounds, leading Team Hill to a 142-136 victory over Team Webber on Friday night.

Coach Nate McMillan said general manager Grant Hill talked to his team before the game about performing like Denver's Kenneth Faried, who had 40 points and 10 rebounds while winning MVP honors last year.

The message got through to Drummond, who grabbed 14 offensive rebounds.

"Drummond had in his mind that he was going to go out and play the game hard," said McMillan, an assistant to Indiana coach Frank Vogel.

"Every rebound that came off the board, he wanted. A few of them he took from his teammates, but I liked his aggressiveness."

Besides an impressive tally of dunks and rebounds, Drummond even managed to make his free throws. A 41 percent shooter during the regular season, the Detroit forward went 6 for 8, including a pair with 29 seconds left after chasing down Bradley Beal's missed free throw to give his team a five-point lead.

He eventually got to hoist the MVP trophy, though not before it fell to the court when a representative from game sponsor BBVA tried to hand it to him. It comes in two pieces, a star on top of the base, and the presenter was apparently unaware when he grabbed it by the top.

"It happened last year, too, so I wasn't expecting anything less," Drummond said. "Usually a slip-up happens every year with the trophy. So I wasn't too shocked about that."

Cleveland's Dion Waiters had 31 points, mostly coming during a 1-on-1 duel with New York's Tim Hardaway Jr. in the second half. Beal finished with 21 for Team Hill, picked by former NBA star Hill.

Hardaway scored 36 points and made seven 3-pointers for fellow former Michigan star Chris Webber's squad. Philadelphia rookie Michael Carter-Williams had 17 points, nine assists and six rebounds.

Portland's Damian Lillard had 13 points, five rebounds and five assists in the victory, making him 1 for 1 during the busiest All-Star weekend ever. Last season's NBA Rookie of the Year will take part in five events, three more on All-Star Saturday and the All-Star game on Sunday.

All-Stars such as Kevin Durant, Dwight Howard and Kyrie Irving watched the game, with Irving leaping to his feet at one point after watching Waiters, his Cavaliers teammate, try to take over the game with about 8 minutes to play.

Waiters had two baskets and then two 3-pointers, one of them when he stepped back after faking a move to the basket that made Hardaway lose his balance. Hardaway answered back with two 3-pointers of his own as the crowd roared.

"We were just trying to do a great job of just getting the fans involved," Hardaway said. "It was kind of dead in there and we just wanted to just start something, a little 1-on-1 battle here and there, and it was great."

Waiters then clinched the duel when he knocked the ball free for a rare defensive highlight in the game, nailing his second straight 3-pointer to give team Hill the lead for good at 126-124 with 2:44 left. Drummond followed with a dunk for a four-point advantage, and Team Webber could never catch up.

The game that began as a matchup of top rookies and later turned into rookies against second-year players now mixes the rosters. That's probably a good thing, since this year's crop of kids is so underwhelming.

Only two of the top 10 picks in the 2013 draft, which has been hindered by injuries, were invited to this game, No. 2 Oladipo and No. 9 Trey Burke.

Players were picked to play on Team Hill and Team Webber, which they wore under their numbers on the back of their jerseys.

Drummond 16 points and 10 rebounds in his first 10 minutes and shot 12 of 21 for the game.

ASU pulls off upset win over Arizona in 2OT

TEMPE, Ariz. -- Jermaine Marshall scored eight of his 29 points in the second overtime and Jordan Bachynski blocked T.J. McConnell's layup attempt with 6 seconds left, sending Arizona State to a 69-66 victory over No. 2 Arizona on Friday night.

With both teams struggling offensively most of the night, Arizona State (19-6, 8-4 Pac-12) turned to Marshall when it counted. He went over 20 minutes without a field goal, but hit consecutive 3-pointers and scored on a drive with 14 seconds left to put the Sun Devils up 67-66.

McConnell then tried to drive the lane, but Bachynski swatted his shot away, leading to Jahii Carson's breakaway dunk.

Arizona State's fans rushed the court, had to be cleared because there was 0.8 seconds left, then poured out of the stands again after Nick Johnson missed a 3-pointer at the buzzer.

McConnell led Arizona (23-2, 10-2) with 17 points and five rebounds. Kaleb Tarczewski had 13 points and 13 rebounds, and Aaron Gordon had 13 points and 10 rebounds for the Wildcats, who shot 35 percent and went 4 of 14 from 3-point range.

Carson finished with 17 points and six assists. Bachynski had 13 points, seven rebounds and blocked eight shots.

Arizona turned the first desert rivalry game into a rout, racing away from the Sun Devils for a 91-68 win in Tucson on Jan. 16.

A lot has changed in a month.

Arizona lost one of its best players in its only loss of the season when forward Brandon Ashley injured his right foot against California two weeks ago.

The Wildcats managed to win their first two games without the versatile sophomore, against the two Oregon schools last week, but had to rejigger their lineup to compensate for his absence.

Arizona State has been on a roll since that loss, winning five of its past six games to get back into the NCAA tournament picture.

The Sun Devils also had Marshall, their second-leading scorer, back in the lineup after he missed the first game with a groin injury and Bachynski has been playing better after missing all three of his shots in Tucson.

Marshall made a huge difference in the rematch after an ugly start that featured more combined fouls (11) than points (nine) the opening eight minutes.

Marshall scored 12 of the Sun Devils' 19 points in the first half, hitting 5 of 10 shots while the rest of the team 3 for 17.

Arizona led 26-21 at halftime after dominating the glass, outrebounding Arizona State 26-15, including 9-3 on the offensive end.

Marshall continued to carry the Sun Devils early in the second half, scoring on a three-point play on a turnaround shot in the lane and earning a chance at another on a hard drive before missing the free throw.

Then it was Carson's turn.

He had two points on 1-of-5 shooting in the first half, but started to assert himself more midway through the second half, scoring six straight points to put Arizona State up 47-41.

Arizona managed to keep the Sun Devils close despite struggling at the free-throw line, but Carson added a step-back jumper and Bachynski hit a free throw to make it 51-46.

The Wildcats fought back, though, with Aaron Gordon scoring on a three-point play and McConnell on a breakaway lead layup to tie it at 51-all with 49 seconds left.

Both teams had a chance to take the lead at the end of regulation, but got off poor shots to send the game to overtime.

SOCHI: What to watch on Saturday

Here's a look at the compelling events, athletes and storylines of the Sochi Olympics on Saturday, Feb. 15.

Alpine Skiing

Women's super-G, 2 a.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

This is the final women's speed event of the Olympics and possibly Julia Mancuso's last really great shot at an Olympic medal.

Mancuso won bronze in the super combined and finished eighth in the downhill. A medal in the super-G would give her five total, matching Bode Miller's record for U.S. Alpine skiers.

This has been Mancuso's best discipline since the Vancouver Olympics yet one she has not won an Olympic medal in. Mancuso was the No. 3, 2 and 2 super-G skier the previous three years before her noted struggles on tour this season.

Her biggest competition will come from Olympic super combined champion Maria Hoefl-Riesch, downhill gold medalists Tina Maze and Dominique Gisin and bronze medalist Lara Gut and Liechtenstein's Tina Weirather, who was on crutches earlier this week.

Men's Hockey

Slovakia-Slovenia, 3 a.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

These two similarly sounding yet not bordering nations will play at the Olympics for the first time, both looking to recover from opening-day defeats.

Slovenia, which features Los Angeles Kings forward Anze Kopitar, is coming off a 5-2 loss to Russia on Thursday. Slovakia, which finished fourth at the 2010 Olympics, was trounced 7-1 by the U.S.

Both teams are likely to feed into the "qualification playoff" round rather than an automatic quarterfinal berth out of group play.

Short Track

Men's 1000m final, 5 a.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

J.R. Celski looks to improve upon his fourth-place finish in the 1500m here, should he make the A final. He finished eighth in the 1000m at the 2010 Olympics and earned a third at a World Cup event in Kolomna, Russia, in November.

The biggest threats will be similar to the 1500m -- Canada's Charles Hamelin, Russia's Viktor Ahn and any South Koreans.

The women's 1500m final will take place 13 minutes before the men's 1000m, but no Americans are expected to be a part of it. US Speedskating has yet to win a medal at these Olympics.

Men's Hockey

U.S.-Russia, 7:30 a.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

This is probably the biggest event of the Olympics without a medal at stake. The U.S. and Russia (or the Unified Team) will play an Olympic men's hockey game for the fourth time since the Miracle on Ice and for the first time on Russian ice.

Here are their results since 1980:
1988: Soviet Union 7, U.S. 5 (group play)
1992: Unified Team 5, U.S. 2 (semifinals)
2002: U.S. 3, Russia 2 (semifinals)
2006: Russia 5, U.S. 4 (group play)

Jonathan Quick will start his second straight game in goal after stopping 21 of 22 Slovakian shots Thursday.

The winner of this game goes into the driver's seat for an automatic spot in the quarterfinals. The loser still has a shot, too, but it will be tougher.

Speed Skating

Men's 1500m, 8:30 a.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

Shani Davis looks to rebound from a startling eighth-place finish in the 1000m Wednesday, an event in which he had won 2006 and 2010 Olympic gold.

Davis is the two-time defending silver medalist in the 1500m, the reigning world silver medalist and the 2013-14 World Cup leader.

Yet this is a fairly open race among Davis, the Netherlands' Stefan Groothuis, Kjeld Nuis and Koen Verweij and Russians Denis Yuzkov and Ivan Skobrev.

The Dutch have won all three men's speed skating golds so far and will be favored in the final two events, the 10,000m and team pursuit. Only the U.S. in 1932, Norway in 1936 and Eric Heiden in 1980 have swept all the men's speed skating golds, but there were five or fewer events at all of those Winter Games.

Skeleton

Men's runs 3 & 4, 9:45 a.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

A U.S. man will likely win an Olympic skeleton medal for the first time since Jim Shea's gold in 2002.

John Daly and Matthew Antoine are in third and fourth, respectively, after two of four runs Friday. Russian Aleksander Tretiakov leads Latvian Martins Dukurs by .56 of a second.

Dukurs, the World Cup champion each of the last five seasons, is staring at his second straight Olympic silver medal after he was upset by Canadian Jon Montgomery in 2010. He is .56 of a second behind Tretiakov.

Daly, who was 17th at the 2010 Olympics, is 1.03 seconds behind Dukurs and .26 better than Antoine. Daly has never won a World Cup or World Championships medal, so this could really be the race of his life.

Men's Hockey

Sweden-Latvia, 12 p.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

Switzerland-Czech Republic, 12 p.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

These are the final games in Group C. Sweden has already booked a spot in the quarterfinals with 4-2 and 1-0 wins over the Czech Republic and Switzerland. Latvia is the minnow of this group and should pose no threat, even with Henrik Zetterberg out of the Olympics.

The winner of the Swiss-Czech game has a chance at an automatic quarterfinal spot. The Czechs beat Latvia 4-2 on Friday behind two goals from Jaromir Jagr, 41. The Swiss have played two 1-0 games, losing the latest to Sweden on Friday.

Ski jumping

Men's large hill, 11:25 p.m. ET -- CLICK HERE TO WATCH EVENT LIVE

Poland's Kamil Stoch, who won the normal hill Sunday, flew a field-best 136m in training Friday from a lower gate position and appears to be the favorite again here.

Swiss Simon Ammann, the four-time Olympic champion, posted a 132m jump in training after finishing 17th in the normal hill.

David Stern elected to Basketball Hall of Fame

NEW ORLEANS (AP) David Stern is going from the NBA commissioner's office to the Hall of Fame.

The recently retired Stern was elected Friday to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and will be enshrined with the class of 2014 on Aug. 8 in Springfield, Mass.

Stern was on a ski trip to Colorado on Friday with his wife while the NBA was holding its first All-Star weekend without him in charge since 1983. New Commissioner Adam Silver and many other league employees who worked under Stern attended the press conference.

"I wanted to be here for David because I knew he wasn't in New Orleans this weekend. Just to be here to share the experience and then relay it back to him what the feel in the room was," said Silver, who worked under Stern since 1992.

"As I said earlier, while David is a modest guy, I know he was moved by the fact this was all happening so quickly, and he has always told me he doesn't like to reflect back sort of on his life or his career, but this will certainly force him to. And I know this is an emotional moment for him and it's an emotional moment for everybody who has worked with him over these years."

Alonzo Mourning, Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond, Kevin Johnson and Spencer Haywood are hoping to be part of the class. They were chosen as finalists, with the full class to be unveiled April 7 during the NCAA Final Four.

Hardaway and Richmond were teammates in Golden State and made up the Warriors' "Run TMC" trio along with Chris Mullin, who was elected to the Hall in 2011.

Stern retired on Feb. 1 after exactly 30 years as commissioner, during which he brought the league to its greatest success. Jerry Colangelo, chairman of the Hall of Fame board, said the Hall hopes to have a special spot to display a tribute to Stern.

"He deserves to be recognized in a huge way," Colangelo said.

Stern was elected by the contributors committee. Also directly elected to the Hall of Fame were Lithuania star Sarunas Marciulionis by the international committee, former Indiana Pacers coach Bob "Slick" Leonard by the ABA committee, former New York Knicks player Nat "Sweetwater" Clifton by the early African-American pioneers committee, and former Temple star Guy Rodgers by the veterans committee.

College coaches Eddie Sutton, Nolan Richardson and Gary Williams were also finalists, as were former women's coach Harley Redin and the women's team from Immaculata College, which won three straight national championships.

Melo rules out trade, open to less than max deal

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Carmelo Anthony said Friday he knows "for a fact" the Knicks won't trade him, and said he would be open to staying in New York for less than a maximum contract.

Anthony has said he plans to become a free agent this summer. The NBA's trade deadline is Thursday, but Anthony ruled out any chance the Knicks would move him to avoid the possibility they could lose him for nothing in July.

"I know for a fact I'm not being traded," Anthony said at the NBA's All-Star weekend. "There's two things: I know for a fact I'm not being traded and I'm not going in there and saying I want to be traded."

New York can pay him around $30 million more than any team, but Anthony said he wouldn't insist on making the Knicks do it.

"As far as the money, it don't really matter to me. If I go somewhere else I get paid, if I stay in New York I get paid," Anthony said. "So as far as the money goes, that's not my concern. My concern is being able to compete on a high level, at a championship level coming at this last stretch of my career."

The Knicks aren't doing it now. They are 20-32, one of the league's biggest disappointments after winning the Atlantic Division last season, and are wasting a strong season by Anthony that has him ranked second in the league with 27.3 points per game while also averaging 8.6 rebounds.

The Knicks need plenty more, and it will be tough to get because they are already so far over the salary cap. Not having to pay Anthony all of the more than $120 million he would be eligible for could help.

"I talk to people all the time. I always say if it takes me taking a pay cut, I'll be the first one on Mr. Dolan's step saying, `Take my money, let's build something stronger,"' Anthony said, referring to Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan.

Anthony was traded to New York just after the All-Star game three years ago and has reached the playoffs in each season. But they are currently out of the playoff picture even in the weak Eastern Conference, and Anthony will have to decide if he feels they can put a championship team around him as he approaches his 30th birthday.

"He makes really good decisions and I feel this decision for him will be no different," said the Clippers' Chris Paul, one of Anthony's closest friends in the league.

"I know he loves it there. His family loves it there. Most of all, he loves to play basketball there. I don't know what his decision will be, but whatever he does, I'll support him 110 percent."

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