National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Nadal wins again to reach French Open quarters

PARIS -- For the first time in his career, Rafael Nadal will make a fifth straight appearance in the French Open quarterfinals.

Nadal won a record 32nd straight match at Roland Garros on Monday, beating Dusan Lajovic of Serbia 6-1, 6-2, 6-1 to improve on his own record by one.

Nadal is an eight-time French Open champion with a 63-1 record on the red clay in Paris. His only loss came in the fourth round in 2009, when he was a four-time defending champion for the first time.

Another upset never seemed possible this time, despite complaints of pain in his back that slowed his serves in the previous round.

"I don't want to talk too much about this thing today," Nadal said of his injury. "I have important match to come. Today I won a match in good shape. We'll see what's going on in the future."

Playing on Court Philippe Chatrier, Nadal's favorite court in the world, the top-seeded Spaniard controlled the match from the start. He then won 17 straight points to open the second set, taking a 4-0 lead before finally sending a backhand wide to make it 15-15 in the fifth game.

Later in that set, Lajovic held three break points at 0-40, but Nadal saved them all and held. It wasn't until late in the third, with the match far out of reach, that Lajovic did manage a break — the only game he won in the final set.

"I played with no mistakes and having the control with the backhand, with the forehand from the baseline," Nadal said. "Sure, you never know what's better, but in theory, the theory says that it's better win like this than win longer matches."

Nadal has won 13 major titles, and is the only man to win eight at one of the four Grand Slam tournaments. With another championship at Roland Garros this year, he would become the first man to win five straight French Open titles.

And he's looking rather unbeatable.

The Spaniard, who turns 28 on Tuesday, has lost only 23 games through four rounds, only four more than he lost in reaching the quarterfinals in 2012.

Nadal will next face fifth-seeded David Ferrer, the man he beat in last year's French Open final. Ferrer defeated 19th-seeded Kevin Anderson of South Africa 6-3, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-1.

In April, Ferrer beat Nadal on clay in the quarterfinals in Monte Carlo.

"Always when you have a loss in the last confrontation, that can (have an) effect. Or not. I don't know," Nadal said. "I will tell you after tomorrow. But at the end, important thing for me is I am in quarterfinals here."

Also Monday, Andy Murray was on court a day after he completed a five-set win over Philipp Kohlschreiber. He was playing Fernando Verdasco of Spain.

In the women's tournament, fourth-seeded Simona Halep of Romania beat Sloane Stephens of the United States 6-4, 6-3, and 10th-seeded Sara Errani of Italy defeated sixth-seeded Jelena Jankovic of Serbia 7-6 (5), 6-2.

Earlier, Andrea Petkovic overcame an inconsistent serve and unseeded Kiki Bertens to reach the quarterfinals with a 1-6, 6-2, 7-5 victory.

The 28th-seeded German was broken three times in the first set, once in the second and three more times in the third. But she was able to earn seven breaks of her own — all in the final two sets — to advance to the quarterfinals at Roland Garros for the second time in her career.

Bertens, a Dutchwoman ranked No. 148, had been bidding to become the lowest ranked woman to reach the French Open quarterfinals since the field at the clay-court major was expanded to 128 players in 1983.

After splitting the first two sets, the players exchanged breaks quickly and often in the third. Each of the first five games went to the returning player, with Petkovic finally holding to lead 4-2.

Both players were broken once more, but Petkovic was able to hold in the last game with a forehand winner on match point.

"It was super tough, because I didn't know her at all," Petkovic said. "I just stalked her on YouTube yesterday the whole day, and I was already impressed yesterday."

Kings beat Blackhawks 5-4 in Game 7

CHICAGO (AP) Alec Martinez scored at 5:47 of overtime, and the Los Angeles Kings beat the Chicago Blackhawks 5-4 in Game 7 of the Western Conference finals Sunday night.

Martinez's shot went off Blackhawks defenseman Nick Leddy and over goalie Corey Crawford, stunning the sellout crowd at the United Center and leading to wild on-ice celebration for Los Angeles. Leddy was disconsolate as the Kings gathered in a big huddle along the boards.

Los Angeles improved to seven for seven in elimination games this postseason and will host the New York Rangers in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday night.

Flip says he expects Love in Minnesota next year

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) During a weekend trip to Boston, All-Star forward Kevin Love has been taking pictures with fans and seeing the sights, leading Celtics fans to speculate that he's going to follow in the footsteps of Kevin Garnett as the next Minnesota star to come to town and turn around a struggling franchise.

Not so fast, Timberwolves president of basketball operations Flip Saunders said.

"The last I knew Kevin was under contract with us, and I expect him to be playing for us next year," Saunders said Sunday after a workout of draft prospects. "I don't really dictate where guys go on vacation or what they do. They can go wherever they want to go."

Love can opt out of his contract after next season, and the three-time All-Star has yet to make the playoffs in six years with the Timberwolves. He was also angered when former executive David Kahn refused to give him a full, five-year extension and instead gave him a four-year deal with a player option after three. That's led many to believe that he will leave next summer to play for a contender in a bigger market.

"Yo (at)kevinlove if you need advice on moving from Minnesota to Boston just let me know (hash)CityOfChamps," tweeted Red Sox slugger David Ortiz, who spent six years with the Minnesota Twins before signing with the Red Sox as a free agent and winning three World Series titles.

The situation has prompted the Timberwolves to consider a trade to avoid losing Love without compensation. But Saunders has made it clear that he doesn't feel as though he has to make a move this summer. He views Love as one of the top offensive players in the league, a 25-year-old who has improved his game every offseason.

So if other teams do want to get their hands on one of the NBA's top power forwards, it won't be easy.

"I know there's a feeding frenzy out there from a lot of teams," Saunders said. "Unfortunately, they have no say. I plan on Kevin being here."

If Saunders was posturing, he has good reason. The draft isn't until June 26, and the best offers from teams desperate to land Love don't figure to start rolling in until the week of the draft, or perhaps not even until draft night, and Saunders has plenty of options.

He could move him right around draft time for what is expected to be a package that includes high picks and a veteran player or two. He could wait for July 1 and look to build a package around more established, veteran talent.

Or he could hold on to Love, try to add a few pieces to a team that finished 10th in the West, and hire the right coach to replace the retired Rick Adelman and show Love that the team is headed in the right direction. It worked for the Portland Trail Blazers with LaMarcus Aldridge, and it worked years ago for the Los Angeles Lakers and Kobe Bryant. The Wolves can also pay Love about $26.5 million more than any other team.

And if Love still does depart after next summer, the Wolves won't be left empty-handed. They'll have about $17 million in extra salary cap room to attack the free agent market, though luring stars to a wintry climate to play for a team that hasn't made the playoffs since 2004 has always proved to be a challenge.

The next big step will be hiring a coach.

The Wolves had discussions with Memphis' Dave Joerger over Memorial Day weekend, but Joerger stayed with the Grizzlies, who sweetened his contract to remain with the 50-win team.

Saunders said he will meet with Wolves owner Glen Taylor this week to evaluate the search, which has been influenced some by the uncertainty surrounding Love.

When asked if he would have a coach in place by the June 26 draft, Saunders said "there's probably a better chance that we would than we wouldn't. We're not going to put a time frame on it."

As for those excited Celtics fans, Saunders said they should calm down. But he knows they won't.

"They're the same fans who thought they had Tim Duncan," he joked. "They still think they got Tim Duncan in the draft. I'm not really sure, but the last I looked he was playing for San Antonio, Old Man Riverwalk."

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Follow Jon Krawczynski on Twitter: http://twitter.com/APKrawczynski

Castroneves wins 2nd Detroit Grand Prix of weekend

DETROIT (AP) Helio Castroneves celebrated in his signature style, climbing a fence, in the same place where he did it for the first time many years ago.

Castroneves' crew joined him above the track in front of roaring fans and it was fitting because his behind-the-scenes teammates helped him have his way with the competition.

"I did not expect that," he said after easily winning the second Detroit Grand Prix race of the weekend Sunday, finishing 1.6836 seconds ahead of Penske Racing teammate Will Power. "They deserved it.

"That was great to see them there."

It was here in Detroit where Castroneves raced to the first of his 29 victories in 2000 and scaled the safety fence.

And, the 39-year-old Brazilian is still winning and climbing with more composure.

"I was able to hold my emotions better," he said. "I guess I'm getting older."

Team owner and unofficial race promoter Roger Penske was not a part of the fence-climbing celebration, but he had to be one of the happiest guys on Belle Isle because Castroneves and Power finished first and second.

"You dream about these weekends," Penske said. "To be as strong as we were and see both guys in the winner's circle."

Castroneves' lead was so large that when he made his final pit stop on Lap 49 he still was ahead when he got back on the track.

The competition got closer after cautions led to restarts with seven and three laps left, but Castroneves could not be caught in part because Power did not want to risk ruining his teammate's path to victory by possibly hitting him.

"Because of Roger, I definitely wasn't going to race him hard," Power said.

Castroneves has 29 IndyCar victories, tying Rick Mears for 11th on the career.

"Oh, really?" Castroneves asked. "Wow. What an honor."

Castroneves finished 0.060 seconds behind Ryan Hunter-Reay last week in the Indianapolis 500 in his bid to join Mears as a four-time winner in open-wheel racing's signature event.

Power won Saturday and played a big part in a sloppy start Sunday.

He was penalized for avoidable contact on the opening lap, failing to turn right and causing Josef Newgarden to hit him from behind to trigger a three-car crash. That led to the first of two cautions within the first ten laps after a false start briefly delayed the race beginning.

Despite a drive-through penalty, Power was able to pull into contention later in the race with aggressive moves.

No one, though, was faster than Castroneves.

Hunter-Reay, meanwhile, had a poor ending to a rough weekend after the biggest win of his career.

He started 21st in the 22-car field on Saturday and Sunday because of crashes. Hunter-Reay ended the first race by crashing on the final lap and the second one did not last as long due to an electrical problem knocking him out after 61 laps.

"You name it, we had the problem this weekend," he said. "I'm just glad to be getting out of here."

Hunter-Reay left Detroit - heading to New York for an appearance Monday night with David Letterman - without the IndyCar points lead.

He entered the weekend with a 40-point lead on Power and exits it in third, 27 points behind Power and eight more behind Castroneves.

"Major hit," Hunter-Reay acknowledged.

Honda had dominated the Detroit Grand Prix the previous two years - in the shadow of Chevy's world headquarters - and had the fastest car last week at the Indy 500.

The engine manufacture did not fare better than fifth on Sunday with James Hinchcliffe following Charlie Kimball and Scott Dixon. Pole-sitter Takuma Sato was spun twice, dropping him to 18th.

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Follow Larry Lage on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/larrylage

Matsuyama wins Memorial in a playoff

DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) Japanese star Hideki Matsuyama made birdie on the final hole Sunday at the Memorial, and then won with a par in the playoff for his first American victory.

Matsuyama didn't look like a winner when hit a poor tee shot on the 18th hole. Lightly slamming his driver on the ground in disgust, the head broke off. He hit an approach to 5 feet for birdie for a 3-under 69. That put him in a playoff with Kevin Na, who finished off his 64 about two hours earlier.

In the playoff, Na drove into the creek. Matsuyama holed a 10-foot par putt for his sixth career win.

Masters champion Bubba Watson was in the lead until a drive out-of-bounds led to double bogey. He missed the playoff by one shot.

Philadelphia Inquirer co-owner Katz dies at 72

PHILADELPHIA (AP) Lewis Katz, a self-made man who built his fortune in New York parking lots, billboards and cable TV, and went on to buy the NBA's New Jersey Nets, NHL's New Jersey Devils and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died in a weekend plane crash. He was 72.

Katz died Saturday night in a Massachusetts crash that claimed six other lives. His death was confirmed Sunday by his son, Drew, and his business partner Harold H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest.

Katz grew up in working-class Camden, New Jersey, and worked as a lawyer before earning hundreds of millions of dollars investing in the Kinney Parking empire and the Yankees Entertainment and Sports Network in New York. He went on to become a major philanthropist in the Philadelphia region.

"You've got to make money in the world that we live in, in order to accomplish what your ultimate goal is. But along with making money, equally important is preserving, for the community, a community trust," Katz testified at an April hearing on the Inquirer's sale. "That's what this paper represents."

Tributes poured in from prominent figures in sports, media, politics, business and education, reflecting the wide range of his interests and charitable endeavors. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called him "a visionary"; the Yankees held a moment of silence before Sunday's game. Temple University recalled his recent advice to graduates to "have as much fun as you can conjure up."

"He was a visionary businessman who touched the lives of so many with his tireless pursuit of innovation and enterprise, as well as his deep commitment to his family, friends and community," Silver said in a statement.

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman in a statement called Katz a man of "tremendous influence" and sent condolences to Katz's family and "the many organizations that benefited from his philanthropy."

Katz, in his April testimony, said he had lost money on both the Nets and Devils, but made it big through the 2012 sale of the sports cable network.

"We lost our shirt in the Devils and the Nets," he testified. "But for the YES network, I'd be back in my law office in Cherry Hill, waiting for the clients to come in again."

He hoped to be a hands-off owner of the Inquirer, where his longtime companion, Nancy Phillips, was the city editor.

"I'm spending, hopefully, a lot more time with my grandchildren and I've opened a school in Camden for approximately 300 children," he testified. "I'm not active in business, anymore."

Katz had agreed to invest $16 million for a 26 percent stake in the Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News in 2012 at the behest of former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who wanted to return the newspapers to local ownership after a bankruptcy that left them in the hands of New York hedge funds.

But a feud with rival investor George Norcross, an equally powerful business leader, over the direction of the news business forced him to be more a more active owner.

Katz filed suit last year to stop Norcross from firing Pulitzer Prize-winning editor Bill Marimow. He succeeded, then joined Lenfest in bidding $88 million to buy out Norcross and his allies at an auction Tuesday.

"He was very creative, as a person and as a business partner," Lenfest said. "He thought beyond the edge. He had wonderful, creative ideas."

The sale had been set to close June 12, but will now be delayed for 30 days to give Katz's family time to get the estate in order, Lenfest said.

"We'll lose his expertise, but the paper will continue because we both intended to put a new CEO in charge of the day-to-day operations," Lenfest said.

Drew Katz will take his father's seat on the board of directors, Lenfest said.

"My father was my best friend. He taught me everything," Drew Katz, who was often seen at his father's side at business events, said in a statement on behalf of him and his sister. "He never forgot where and how he grew up, and he worked tirelessly to support his community in countless ways that were seen and unseen."

Katz had recently given $25 million to Temple University for its medical school, and had previously given $15 million to another alma mater, Dickinson Law School, where he had graduated first in his class.

He also supported the Boys & Girls Clubs in Camden, along with many Jewish charities. Katz recently helped fund a charter school in impoverished Camden.

"There are so many organizations that he endowed, many anonymously," Marimow said Sunday.

Marimow described Katz as a brilliant man and generous philanthropist who developed a love for journalism from a college stint working for the syndicated columnist Drew Pearson.

"That really inspired an appreciation and a love for journalism that lasted his whole life," Marimow said.

His wife, Marjorie, died in December. His survivors include his son, daughter Melissa, and several grandchildren.

Katz, a classmate of Bill Cosby in Temple's 1963 graduating class, had spoken at the school's commencement last month, and received an honorary doctorate.

"Life in my view is meant to be enjoyed," he told the graduates. "It's meant to have as much fun as you can conjure up"

Johnson builds track on record with 9th Dover win

DOVER, Del. (AP) Jimmie Johnson dominated again at Dover International Speedway, extending his track record for wins with nine.

He followed last week's victory in the Coca-Cola 600 with another sensational run in a race red-flagged for 22 minutes because of a pothole in the concrete track.

Johnson led 272 of 400 laps, and won consecutive races for the 13th time. The six-time Cup champion swept Dover in 2002 and 2009 and won races in 2005, 2010, 2012 and 2013.

Brad Keselowski was second, followed by Matt Kenseth, Clint Bowyer and Denny Hamlin.

Johnson also became Dover's career leader in laps led when he hit the 2,802 mark.

Spurs beat Thunder in OT, advance to NBA Finals

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) The San Antonio Spurs are back in the NBA Finals, beating the Oklahoma City Thunder 112-107 in overtime on Saturday night in Game 6 to set up a rematch with the Miami Heat.

Tim Duncan had 19 points and 15 rebounds for the Spurs, who will host Game 1 on Thursday night as they try to avenge last year's heartbreaking seven-game defeat.

Boris Diaw scored 26 points for the Spurs, who won despite point guard Tony Parker missing the entire second half and overtime with left ankle soreness.

Russell Westbrook had 34 points, eight assists, seven rebounds and six steals, and Kevin Durant added 31 points and 14 rebounds for the Thunder. Oklahoma City overcame a 12-point deficit in the fourth quarter to force overtime.

Will Power wins 1st of 2 Detroit Grand Prix races

DETROIT (AP) Will Power gave Roger Penske and Chevrolet what they desperately wanted by winning the first of two races at the Detroit Grand Prix.

"On his home track and in Chevy's backyard, it's a perfect day," Power said Saturday. "If we can do it again tomorrow, it'll be even better."

Power finished 0.3308 seconds ahead of Graham Rahal on the bumpy, 13-turn, 2.36-mile street circuit on Belle Isle.

He started a season-worst 16th and took the lead for good with just more than 10 laps to go when he passed Ryan Briscoe.

"There's no way we thought we would come from 16th to win," he said. "But this is IndyCar and anything can happen."

The Australian held off Rahal to join Indianapolis 500 champion Ryan Hunter-Reay as the series' drivers with two victories through six races. Power pulled within three points of Hunter-Reay, IndyCar's points leader.

Power, who won IndyCar's season-opening race, has 23 career victories to break a tie with Emerson Fittipaldi and Tony Bettenhausen and to match Tommy Milton for 18th on the all-time list.

His latest victory was especially sweet for Penske and Chevy.

Penske had not won an open-wheel race in the area he calls home since Helio Castroneves finished first in 2001.

"It's sure a great piece of satisfaction for me to see this happen," Penske acknowledged.

And for Chevy, which sponsors the race, it was a good day after being relegated to watching Honda dominate the previous three races over the last two years in the shadow of its world headquarters.

"We swept the podium in 2012," Art St. Cyr, president of Honda Performance Development, said a few hours before Saturday's race. "We won both races last year, swept the podium in one race and had two of the three spots in the other race

"There are a lot of Chevy folks here, so you do walk around with your chest puffed out a little bit more."

After the 70-lap race, Honda had to settle for Rahal's second-place finish as its only driver on the podium. Rahal, whose only career victory was in 2008, had finished no better than 13th this year.

"It's a great day for us with the year we've had and the luck we've had," Rahal said.

Tony Kanaan was a season-best third followed by Justin Wilson and Castroneves, who was the pole-sitter and led a race-high 30 laps Saturday.

"I wish I could relax," Kanaan said "My mind is already going on what I have to do tomorrow."

Hunter-Reay, meanwhile, failed to follow up the biggest win of his career with a 16th-place finish. He was on the last lap, but did not make it to the finish line because he spun into a tire wall to end the race. He started 21st in the 22-car field because he brushed a wall on his second lap during Saturday morning's qualifying session.

"We had a rough day overall," Hunter-Reay said.

Simon Pagenaud and Mike Conway each won last year on Belle Isle and both lost their shot to win early Saturday.

Pagenaud damaged his front left suspension when he ran into the back of Power, leading to a yellow.

"I didn't even know where Pagenaud was," Power insisted.

Conway did not have any one around him when he appeared to understeer into a wall on Lap 15, putting the race under caution.

Both will get another shot to repeat at the Detroit Grand Prix on Sunday as part of IndyCar's first of three doubleheaders this season.

While Penske was thrilled with the victory after Castroneves was barely beaten by Hunter-Reay's Honda-powered car last Sunday at the Indy 500, he knew there were fewer than 24 hours to celebrate before the next race on Sunday.

"We all start from ground zero," he said.

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Follow Larry Lage on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/larrylage

Wild sign Mike Yeo to extension

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) Mike Yeo's three-year run in Minnesota has been anything but easy. The Wild coach has had to navigate key injuries to his roster, his own growing pains in his first NHL head coaching job and the considerable expectations brought forth when the team's owner spent nearly $200 million on two players two summers ago.

The Wild have improved under Yeo in each season, and Yeo has improved himself enough to earn the faith of the Wild leadership going forward.

Yeo signed a multi-year contract extension with the Wild on Saturday, the team announced. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but the agreement was expected after Yeo guided the team out of the first round of the playoffs for just the second time in franchise history in the final year of his original deal. He has gone 104-82-26 in three seasons with the Wild.

"Mike has done a very good job the last three seasons as our head coach and we look forward to his leadership going forward," Wild general manager Chuck Fletcher said.

Yeo was an unproven coach with no NHL head coaching track record to go by when Fletcher picked him to take over for Todd Richards three seasons ago. The Wild faded after a strong start to Yeo's first season and never found a rhythm in his second year, an abbreviated 48-game schedule due to the lockout. The Wild did snap a five-season playoff drought in his second season, but were dominated by Chicago in a first-round defeat.

His status was tenuous at best by New Year's Eve last season, when the Wild lost their sixth straight game and Yeo felt compelled at the next practice to tell the players he wouldn't coach simply to save his job. But despite foot injuries that kept stars Zach Parise and Mikko Koivu and key defenseman Jared Spurgeon out for long stretches of the winter, Yeo helped hold the group together while the wins picked up. The Wild played all season with a carousel in the net, too, with four different goalies starting 10 games each or more.

"There were times where the wheels could've come off, and he kept it together," said defenseman Ryan Suter, one of several players to endorse Yeo after the season-ending loss to Chicago.

The Wild solidified his status in the playoffs with a seven-game victory over Colorado in the first round when the Avalanche led 2-0 and 3-2 in the series. They gave the Blackhawks a fight, too, until falling in six games.

The late-season surge, and Yeo's impressive strategic decisions both rounds of the playoffs, gave Fletcher the faith that he had the right man for the job.

"I am very excited to continue to coach the Minnesota Wild and pursue a Stanley Cup for the State of Hockey," Yeo said. "Our fan support has been amazing and it went to a new level during the playoffs this season. We are all motivated to reward them."

Watson takes a 1-shot lead at Memorial

DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) Bubba Watson put himself in position for his third win of the year Saturday with a 3-under 69 to take a one-shot lead over Scott Langley at the Memorial.

Watson has never finished in the top 20 at Muirfield Village. Even with a bogey on the last hole, he had his third straight round in the 60s and was at 12-under 204.

It will be an all-lefty final pairing with Langley, who has gone 40 straight holes without a bogey and had a 67.

The most famous Lefty, Phil Mickelson, had a 72 while coping with reports he is involved in an insider trading investigation.

Hideki Matsuyama of Japan birdied his last hole for a 69 and was two shots behind. Adam Scott was three shots back after a 68.

Mickelson says he's cooperating in trading probe

DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) Hall of Fame golfer Phil Mickelson confirmed that FBI agents investigating insider trading approached him this week at the Memorial Tournament. The five-time major champion said Saturday he has done "absolutely nothing wrong."

A federal official briefed on the investigation told The Associated Press the FBI and Securities and Exchange Commission are analyzing trades Mickelson and Las Vegas gambler Billy Walters made involving Clorox at the same time activist investor Carl Icahn was attempting to take over the company. When Icahn's intent became public, the stock price jumped.

The official was unauthorized to speak about the investigation and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity. Reports of the investigation appeared in several newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal.

Smiling as he stood before a room packed with reporters and cameras, Mickelson said the case had not been a distraction until FBI agents approached him after his opening round Thursday.

He said it would not affect his preparations for the U.S. Open in two weeks, the only major he lacks for the career Grand Slam.

"It's not going to change the way I carry myself," Mickelson said after an even-par 72 left him far behind the leaders. "Honestly, I've done nothing wrong. I'm not going to walk around any other way."

The federal official told the AP that Mickelson and Walters placed their trades about the same time in 2011. Federal investigators are looking into whether Icahn shared information of his takeover attempt of Clorox with Walters, and whether Walters passed that information to Mickelson.

The New York offices of the U.S. Attorney and the FBI declined to comment.

The newspaper reports said federal officials also were examining trades by Mickelson and Walters involving Dean Foods Co. in 2012.

After a brief interview, Mickelson stepped outside and signed autographs for about 20 minutes, like it was any other day at a tournament. Fans were supportive as ever on the golf course, and Mickelson gave away so many golf balls to children and his caddie asked a tour official to retrieve more balls from his locker when they reached the turn.

Mickelson wouldn't discuss details about his relationship with Walters, a multimillionaire who owns several golf courses and auto dealerships. He wouldn't talk about stock tips he received, but reiterated that he did nothing wrong.

"And that's why I've been fully cooperating with the FBI agents, and I'm happy to do in the future, too, until this gets resolved," he said.

When asked whether Walters advised him to invest in Clorox or Dean Foods, Mickelson matter-of-factly replied to a Wall Street Journal reporter, "You should know. You wrote the article."

Icahn, 78, is one of Wall Street's most successful corporate raiders, famous for buying stock in underperforming companies, pressuring them to reform and selling out for a fat profit. In recent years, his targets have included Apple Inc., eBay and Dell Inc. His efforts have made him one of America's richest people: Forbes magazine puts his net worth at more than $20 billion, making him the 18th-wealthiest American.

In the 1980s, he pioneered so-called greenmail raids in which financiers threatened companies with hostile takeovers unless they were paid a premium to go away.

Walters is a legendary figure in sports betting circles, widely feared by sports book operators as one of the few people who can consistently win. He's bet millions on Super Bowls alone, and told "60 Minutes" in a 2011 profile that he has never had a losing year. An early user of computer data, Walters was one of the few bettors whose opinion was so respected that he could move point spreads if it was known what side he was betting on.

Walters and a group of bettors dubbed The Computer Group were indicted in the mid-1980s for running what prosecutors said was a bookmaking operation, but were acquitted at trial. Walters was also indicted on money laundering charges in 1998 and had $2.8 million in cash confiscated from a safe deposit box, but the charges were later dismissed and the money returned.

Walters was also a high stakes gambler on the golf course, regularly playing celebrities or PGA Tour pros for cash. He told Golf Digest that he once lost a $2 million bet and once made a 40-foot putt worth $400,000. Walters teamed up with touring pro partner Fredrik Jacobson to win the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am by 10 strokes in 2008 while playing as an 11 handicap.

Politically connected in Las Vegas, Walters is also known for his philanthropy, particularly toward Opportunity Village, which trains developmentally disabled adults.

Mickelson, 43, was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2011. He goes to the U.S. Open next month with a chance to become only the sixth golfer to capture all four major championships. He has not won since the British Open last summer.

Mickelson has long had a reputation to gamble, though he has said he scaled back his habit after his son, Evan, was born in 2003. The most publicized payoff was when Mickelson and friends won $560,000 on a preseason bet (28-1 odds) that the Baltimore Ravens would win the 2001 Super Bowl.

He has a long history of playing money games during the practice rounds. He occasionally gets a group of players and caddies together for dinner and small wagering during the NBA and NHL playoffs, and prominent fights.

A year ago, Mickelson was criticized for public comments that tax increases in California kept him from being part of the San Diego Padres' new ownership group and might cause him to leave his native state. He said his federal and state taxes amount to over 60 percent.

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Associated Press writer Tom Hays in New York, Associated Press writers Paul Wiseman and Eric Tucker in Washington, AP Sports Writer Tim Dahlberg in Las Vegas and AP Sports Writer Rusty Miller in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to this report.

Nationals hit 4 homers in 10-2 win over Rangers

WASHINGTON (AP) Nationals first baseman Adam LaRoche agreed there's something to the theory that hitting is contagious.

If so, it looks as if there's suddenly an epidemic on the Nationals.

Anthony Rendon went 4 for 5 and hit one of four Washington home runs, and Doug Fister allowed four hits in six innings, sending the Nationals to a 10-2 rout of the Texas Rangers on Saturday.

LaRoche, Jose Lobaton and pinch-hitter Scott Hairston also homered.

"We've seen that a bunch," LaRoche said when asked if good hitting can spread through a team. "We saw stretches of it last year where we would do this and say `here we go.'

"This was huge to build off of, to know that we can go out there and get more than five or six hits a game and just keep pouring it on," LaRoche said. "That's what the really good teams do."

Washington has racked up 24 runs and 42 hits in its last three games, winning two straight to climb back to .500.

Fister (3-1) allowed two runs and retired the first 10 Texas batters. He's 3-0 with a 2.13 ERA in his last four starts, with 21 strikeouts and two walks.

He came in with a 5.67 career ERA against the Rangers, but didn't give up a hit until Elvis Andrus doubled in the fourth.

"He's got the ability to work quickly, which certainly helps your defense," manager Matt Williams said. "They expect the ball to be put in play."

The defense helped Fister in the second when Rendon made stellar backhand play at third and threw out Adrian Beltre.

"That's a great play, probably the most difficult one over there," said Williams, a former third baseman. "It's the high chopper that you can't come get, that you have to give on and he goes down to his knees to stop himself and turn and throw. It's difficult because there is no momentum involved."

Rendon said: "I don't know. I just threw it. It happened to go to (LaRoche)."

Rangers starter Nick Tepesch (2-1) allowed five runs, four earned, on seven hits. He had won two straight, but didn't make it past the second inning Saturday.

The Nationals took a 1-0 lead in the first when Rendon lined Tepesch's pitch into the Rangers bullpen for his sixth home run. He had six straight hits over two days before striking out in the eighth.

In the second, Lobaton, spelling Wilson Ramos in a day game after a night game, worked the count to 3-2 before hitting a two-run homer into the first row of seats in right center. Tepesch had given up just two homers in 18 1-3 innings before Saturday.

"I think what caused him his demise (was) early on he was going deep in counts, and that's a fastball hitting team, and he had to try and throw a strike," Texas manager Ron Washington said. "And when he did they made him pay for it."

The Nationals weren't done in the second, with singles by Denard Span and Rendon. Jayson Werth doubled and the ball was bobbled in left by Shin-Soo Choo. Span and Rendon scored to make it 5-0.

Washington broke the game open in the fourth.

Andrus lost Fister's pop-up in the sun and it fell for a lead-off single. Then with first and second and one out, Werth hit a smash that Andrus bobbled before getting the force at second, with Werth just beating the relay.

LaRoche then followed with a three-run shot, his seventh of the year, putting the Nationals up 8-0. He has hit safely in all five games (7 for 22) since returning from a right quad strain.

The Rangers got to Fister in the fifth when Alex Rios walked and scored on a double by Rougned Odor, and Mitch Moreland added an RBI-single in the sixth. Hairston, pinch-hitting for Werth, hit a two-run homer in the sixth.

NOTES: Washington used pitcher Nick Martinez to pinch hit for Tepesch in the third inning. Martinez grounded out. ... It was the Rangers' sixth straight game without hitting a home run. ... Nationals 3B Ryan Zimmerman (broken right thumb) was to play five innings in left field during his second rehab game Saturday night at Class A Potomac, Virginia. Zimmerman went 0 for 3 with a sacrifice fly as the designated hitter Friday night. ... Hairston has 13 career pinch-hit homers, the most among active players. ... RH Yu Darvish (4-2, 2.35) faces Washington's Tanner Roark (3-3, 3.47) in Sunday's series finale.

Monfils makes his strategy work at French Open

PARIS (AP) Leading two sets to one but already down a break in the fourth, Gael Monfils decided he needed to catch his breath.

So he tanked the set. Lost it 6-0. Didn't even try.

And his strategy worked perfectly.

The 23rd-seeded Frenchman advanced to the fourth round at the French Open by beating Fabio Fognini 5-7, 6-2, 6-4, 0-6, 6-2 in a match that had a combined 137 unforced errors and one penalty point.

"He (broke) me straight away. Somehow I was starting to struggle a little bit, not cramping, but I feel really tired," Monfils said of his fourth-set tactics. "And then I tried to break back. Couldn't break back.

"It's, like, I want to serve first in the fifth. So, I mean, the only option I had is to take 6-love. Why should I make any effort?"

In the fifth set, Monfils jumped out to a 3-0 lead, earning the last point for free when Fognini was penalized for throwing his racket in frustration following a forehand that went wide. The racket landed near a ball boy.

Still sulking after the penalty point was ordered, it was Fognini's turn to slow things down.

The Italian called for a medical timeout to have his left thigh massaged and taped, drawing boos from the French crowd.

"I called the physio because I was feeling, during the fourth set, some pain on my left quad and nothing more," Fognini said.

Monfils, who lost to Fognini in five sets at Roland Garros in 2010, said there was more to it than that.

"You know, he was tired. He would grumble and say he's not happy, and he took time," Monfils said. "He told the supervisor or the chair umpire, he said, `I want to take my three minutes, get me the physio.'

"Then I told the chair umpire, `Well, I'm tired too.' I said, `One and a half minutes he's discussed with you and then after this he's asking for the physiotherapist to come? How strange.' But then, he did it right. He got the physiotherapist, and he broke back. Good thing he did that. Well played."

The match, however, was rather poorly played, stats-wise, anyway.

Monfils and Fognini combined to make more than twice as many unforced errors as winners, with the Italian managing 43 winners and 81 unforced errors and the Frenchman chipping in with 23 and 56.

Regardless of the numbers, Monfils is headed to the fourth round to face Guillermo Garcia-Lopez of Spain, the man who eliminated Australian Open champion Stan Wawrinka in the first round.

"I'm going to do ice bath for sure tonight and tomorrow. Will do a lot of stretching, massage, and maybe bike a little bit, try to eat good," Monfils said. "Try to be ready for Monday."

St. Louis, Moore overcome grief during Rangers run

NEW YORK (AP) Mourning and heartbreak have accompanied Martin St. Louis and Dominic Moore during the New York Rangers' run to the Stanley Cup finals.

The unexpected death of St. Louis' mother during these playoffs kept him away from hockey for one day. Moore was out of the NHL for 1 1/2 years after his wife contracted a rare and ultimately fatal illness.

Now they are finding solace on the ice and in the close-knit New York dressing room. The veteran forwards have provided key goals that have fueled the team's surge to the Eastern Conference title.

In the conference finals against Montreal, St. Louis scored in overtime of Game 4 to give the Rangers a 3-1 series lead. Moore netted the only goal Thursday as New York advanced to the Cup finals for the first time in 20 years with a Game 6 victory at raucous Madison Square Garden.

The 38-year-old St. Louis has been counted on to score during his long career. Moore, a grinder, is chipping in from the Rangers' gritty fourth line. Of his three playoff goals, two have been game-winners.

"It's an incredible feeling to be able to play for the Cup," the 33-year-old Moore said. "The opportunity is something special that you look forward to since you're a kid."

It is a dream that might have seemed lost not long ago.

Moore stepped away from the San Jose Sharks in April 2012 during the playoffs to take care of his wife, Katie, who died in January 2013 from liver cancer at 32.

Moore began his NHL career with the Rangers during the 2003-04 season after playing at Harvard. He had stints with Pittsburgh, Minnesota, Toronto, Buffalo, Florida, Montreal, Tampa Bay and San Jose, before returning to New York last summer on a one-year, $1 million deal.

"It's been a long, pretty amazing journey, so far, and hopefully it continues," Moore said. "I owe a lot to my teammates for helping me get through this last year and a half. I just feel tremendously proud to be a part of this team, especially amid the circumstances of going to the Stanley Cup finals."

He split the 2011-12 season with Tampa Bay and San Jose, scoring four goals and adding 21 assists in 79 games. Moore's time away didn't dull his skills or his desire. Now he is on the cusp of a championship.

"Every time we've had a big game, he's stepped up with a great performance," defenseman Marc Staal said. "He's a guy that talks about it a lot, too - not being afraid to make mistakes, and going out there and playing confident."

St. Louis' turmoil was more sudden. He learned of his mother's death when he arrived in Pittsburgh before Game 5 of the second round. The Rangers were already facing playoff elimination after a subpar home loss the night before dropped them into a 3-1 series hole.

St. Louis headed home to the Montreal area to be with his family, but returned to Pittsburgh the next day. The gesture galvanized the club, the players comforting a grieving teammate. The Rangers went on to the best comeback in franchise history.

New York beat Pittsburgh in Game 5, went home for another win on Mother's Day - a game in which St. Louis scored the first goal - and then claimed Game 7 back on the road to advance to the conference finals.

"I know both (Moore) and Marty have gone through some challenging times," Rangers coach Alain Vigneault said. "I think they've found refuge, found a way to find a place where they can be happy. That is at the rink with their teammates and on the ice. They've both been very inspirational leaders throughout the whole thing."

The Rangers are 7-2 since St. Louis' mother died. The funeral was held outside Montreal between Games 1 and 2 there, allowing the Rangers to attend as a team.

Moore had six goals and 12 assists in 73 regular-season games. He scored twice in the first round against Philadelphia, including the winner in Game 5. He is the Rangers' nominee for the Masterton Trophy, given to the NHL player who best exemplifies perseverance and dedication to hockey.

"There have been quite a few story lines this year, and those two are obviously big ones," assistant captain Brad Richards said, referring to Moore and St. Louis. "That's just the way things go with teams that go through runs. There always seem to be little things that you can grab and build on.

"The stars have to align, and it's great that those guys have the feeling that someone is watching over them and helping them out."

With Manziel in camp, Browns look to manage crush

BEREA, Ohio (AP) The Browns have a game plan to manage "Manzielmania" this summer.

Expecting huge crowds to see rookie quarterback Johnny Manziel compete with Brian Hoyer for the starting job, the Browns want fans to register online to attend training camp.

Cleveland can accommodate only about 5,000 fans at its facility. Browns President Alec Scheiner told The Associated Press the team will ask fans to sign up beforehand so "we don't turn away 2,000 or 3,000 fans who just show up."

Scheiner said the team will announce when capacity is reached, but fans can still come and wait to get in. The team is working out final details of the registration. Camp will remain free.

Manziel's arrival has created a buzz around the Browns, who moved up in the first round of the NFL draft to select the celebrated Heisman Trophy winner who hangs out with rapper Drake and has NBA superstar LeBron James as a business partner.

Scheiner said the Browns' season-ticket base has grown by more than 4,000 since Manziel was picked. His No. 2 jersey is on store shelves in the Cleveland area and is already one of the league's top sellers before he has played in a game.

Manziel is currently behind Hoyer on the depth chart, and there's no guarantee he'll move up when the season starts. But that won't stop fans from flocking to see Johnny Football, who caused a stir last weekend by taking a trip to Las Vegas.

Manziel was in Los Angeles on Friday with 34 other rookies to attend a rookie symposium run by the players' union.

The Browns set attendance records at training camp last year and Scheiner anticipates this year's crowds to be "a little bit better."

"It's exciting, and it's fun," he said. "We're getting better."

Scheiner, who spent eight years with the Dallas Cowboys before he was hired by Cleveland after the 2012 season, said the Browns have begun looking into moving their camp to a college campus. The team previously trained at Bowling Green (1946-51), Hiram (1952-74), Kent State (1975-81) and Lakeland Community College (1982-91) before holding camp in Berea, the year-round training headquarters.

Scheiner points to the many challenges in moving training camp, including transportation costs, getting practice fields up to NFL specifications as well as housing.

"We'll look at it," he said. "If there's something that makes sense, we'll look at it. If there's not, we won't. But we're going to start looking at it carefully."

If the Browns do move camp, Scheiner expects the new site to be within driving distance of Cleveland.

Last year, the Browns drew 56,306 fans to their 13 open practices at the training facility and a family night session at FirstEnergy Stadium. They averaged 2,475 fans per practice in Berea and set a one-day record of 4,466.

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AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP-NFL

SEC hands out record $309.6M for 2013-14

DESTIN, Fla. (AP) Southeastern Conference revenue remains on the rise. It should make a major jump next year following the launch of the SEC Network.

The SEC will distribute a record $309.6 million in revenue to its 14 member institutions, which equates to $20.9 million per school.

Commissioner Mike Slive announced the payout Friday, the final day of the annual SEC meetings.

The revenue is generated from football and basketball television contracts, bowl games, the league's football championship game, the league's men's basketball tournament, NCAA championships and supplemental surplus. It has nearly doubled since 2009, when the league doled out $165.9 million to its schools.

It could rise significantly next year, with estimations ranging from $15 million to $20 million because of added television revenue.

"There are some numbers floating around out there, but everything is speculative," Slive said. "We're optimistic. We believe the product is so good. We believe the network is so strong. We believe the network will be national. We believe it will generate revenue as it grows over the next decade, but to speculate as to how much that will add to the revenue through the conference to our institutions is really speculative."

The SEC also passed five proposals Friday.

The most significant change involved an automatic waiver for graduate-school transfers with less than two years of eligibility remaining, a move that should expedite the transfer process.

Previously, the SEC required a waiver for anyone to transfer with less than two years of eligibility remaining. The waiver had to be approved by the conference, essentially causing red tape that football and basketball coaches felt was putting them at a competitive disadvantage.

"I think it's been a factor - not the only factor - in the success of men's basketball and it's being addressed," Auburn basketball coach Bruce Pearl said.

Not everyone agreed.

Florida president Bernie Machen called the graduate-transfer rule "bad."

"I just don't think that it's a rule that the NCAA ought to have at all," Machen said. "If they really wanted to transfer somewhere else, then they should sit out a year. If you didn't have anything to do, you could track and see how many of them completed their grad program. It was put together under the banner of helping the athlete. It's really not. It's just a way for a school to fill a void at a very last moment or a player to get more playing time without sitting out."

The league also:

- Allowed the use of artificial noisemakers - even music and sound controlled by the school - at any time during football games except from the time the center is over the football until the end of the play.

- Increased the roster size for tennis teams from eight to 10 during SEC championship play.

- Tweaked roster rules for soccer teams, allowing coaches to change his or her 22 available players from game to game instead of setting the roster before the SEC tournament begins.

Brad Keselowski wins pole at Dover

DOVER, Del. (AP) Brad Keselowski turned a track-record lap of 164.444 mph to win the pole at Dover International Speedway.

Keselowski won his second pole of the season on Friday and fifth of his career. Kyle Busch, Joey Logano, Jimmie Johnson and Kyle Larson round out the top five for Sunday's race.

Series points leader Jeff Gordon was sixth, followed by Denny Hamlin, Kevin Harvick, Brian Vickers and Clint Bowyer. Bowyer turned 35 on Friday.

Rangers overcome rough start to reach Cup finals

NEW YORK (AP) Eight months ago, first-year Rangers coach Alain Vigneault could never have imagined he would now be behind the bench for New York's first Stanley Cup finals appearance in 20 years.

The mere suggestion made him laugh Thursday night after the Rangers advanced with a 1-0 victory over the Montreal Canadiens in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals,

"In October? I probably would have said, `What are you smoking?"' he said.

Thursday marked the one-year anniversary of New York's firing of blustery coach John Tortorella, who was dismissed after a second-round elimination. One year earlier, Tortorella led the Rangers to the conference finals, but they couldn't get past New Jersey.

Vigneault was hired last June after he was let go by Vancouver. He wasn't starting from scratch with the Rangers, but no one predicted the heights he and his team have quickly achieved.

New York began this season with a nine-game road trip because of major renovations at Madison Square Garden. When the Rangers finally limped home, they were 3-6 and near the bottom of both the Metropolitan Division and the Eastern Conference.

They got over .500 with a New Year's Eve victory at Florida and improved to a 45-31-6 record for a second-place divisional finish.

"We worked our way and improved how we played," said Vigneault, who coaches with a much calmer style than Tortorella. "Ever since we've gotten in, all the series have been so competitive and so hard-fought. We've gotten the goaltending we need and we've found ways to win."

That recipe has continued to fuel their run in the playoffs. Now they are in the finals for the 11th time and are seeking their fifth title. Chicago or Los Angeles will be the opponent.

The Rangers edged Philadelphia by two points in the division, which secured home-ice advantage in the first-round matchup between the clubs. That was critical because after the Flyers stayed alive in Game 6 with a 5-2 win in which star goalie Henrik Lundqvist was chased from the net, the Rangers hosted Game 7 - and advanced with a tense 2-1 victory.

Lundqvist led the way then, carried them through the second round against Pittsburgh after the Rangers fell into a 3-1 hole, and punctuated New York's trip to the finals with his franchise-record-tying ninth playoff shutout when the Rangers knocked out Montreal.

That clincher also came after a clunker. Lundqvist was driven out in the second period of Game 5 in Montreal after allowing four goals in a 7-4 loss.

"It was my toughest (season) start in my career," said Lundqvist, who has spent nine seasons in the NHL. "It feels better when you turn it around and good things start to happen. It's been a great ride so far, especially the second half."

Lundqvist leaped in jubilation several times when time ran out Thursday. It was a combination of joy, relief, and pure satisfaction to finally clear this major hurdle two decades in the making for the Rangers.

The series victory was New York's first in fewer than seven games since 2008.

The last time they got this far, Mark Messier was making guarantees as captain as the Rangers ended a 54-year curse without a Cup title. Compared to that, 20 years is a mere drop in the bucket.

"You never know what can happen in a year," said Brad Richards, one of three assistant captains. "We felt confident going into the season. We all know now if you just get in and get hot ... but we had the start that we did. It got a little shaky there for a while.

"It took a while to get everybody going. It was a testament to the group.

" We lost it, we kept battling, and figured it out to get a chance to win the Cup."

One move that solidified this postseason run was the trade-deadline deal that brought Martin St. Louis to New York from Tampa Bay for Ryan Callahan, a rare swap of team captains.

St. Louis got only one goal and seven assists in 19 regular-season games with the Rangers, but he is tied for the club lead with 13 playoff points and six goals. His overtime score in Game 4 against Montreal gave New York a 3-1 edge.

His on-ice production is only part of the story, of course. The team was galvanized following the unexpected death of St. Louis' mother at the low point of the Pittsburgh series. The Rangers are 7-2 since.

"It's been a tough year for me. This makes it pretty cool," said St. Louis, who won the Stanley Cup with Richards and the Lightning in 2004 when Tortorella was their coach. "Being somewhere for 13, 14 years and changing teams, and to get a chance to play in the Stanley Cup finals with these teammates who have been nothing but great through my tough time, it makes it even more special."

Phil Jackson asks Carmelo to delay free agency

GREENBURGH, N.Y. (AP) Phil Jackson lost out on his preferred coach, but he's working hard on keeping his star player.

The New York Knicks president said Friday he has talked to Carmelo Anthony about postponing free agency, and the All-Star forward responded that he'll think about it.

"I told him it might be a good idea to hang in here and see what it's like for a year, and go out the next year," Jackson said.

Anthony can opt out of the final year of his contract, which would pay him $23.3 million, and has repeatedly said that was his plan. But Jackson said there are financial benefits to Anthony waiting, for both sides, and told him that during a dinner about a month ago.

"He opened the door and I stuck my foot in it and said this is what we can do," Jackson said to the team's beat writers.

Jackson also told Anthony that Steve Kerr would be coming in to coach, a plan that didn't work out.

Kerr was his first and only known candidate to replace Mike Woodson, and Jackson said Kerr had essentially committed to leave the TNT broadcast booth to take the job. But then the Golden State job opened up when the Warriors fired Mark Jackson, and Kerr preferred that one to remain close to his family in California.

"Unfortunately for him, he committed to me the day before the job opened with Golden State. So I had to kind of release him to actually go to this job and say you have to do what's right for yourself," Jackson said. "I understood entirely the process he was going through to have that job open up. That was something he kind of thought would be a good fit for him. So that's good, we're happy for him."

Jackson said he's been doing some interviews, though wouldn't name those candidates. He's interested in talking to Derek Fisher, who played for him in Los Angeles, after Oklahoma City's season is finished, but ruled out Brian Shaw, his former player and assistant who just completed his first season as Denver's first coach. The Nuggets have said they are happy with Shaw - and Jackson doesn't want to give them any compensation even if they would consider letting him leave.

"Brian is under contract with Denver," Jackson said. "Denver has everything that we owned for the last few years, so there's nothing else I want to give them."

He was referring to the exorbitant price the Knicks paid to acquire Anthony from the Nuggets in 2011. It is still costing them even now, as Denver owns the Knicks' first-round pick next month in Jackson's first draft in charge.

The deal would hurt even more if Anthony left this summer. But perhaps Jackson, who is a little more than two months into his job, won't have to worry about it after giving Anthony something to think about that he previously wasn't considering.

"I'm not losing sleep over it, but I'm definitely concerned about the idea of a guy going into free agency," Jackson said. "It only takes one bidder out there that has the ability and can ruin your hopes and your chances.

"We will survive it. That's what I've said and we'll go forward. But this is a guy we recognize his talent and his skill is the kind of skill and talent that gets you through playoff games where things get sticky, grind out and basketball becomes a force game and suddenly you need to have a player who has the capabilities of scoring with someone hanging on them in a situation that's critical.

"He's one of those players, one of the few players who can do that."

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