National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Ryu perfect for 7, Dodgers hold off Reds 4-3

LOS ANGELES (AP) Hyun-Jin Ryu took a perfect game into the eighth inning - one day after teammate Josh Beckett threw a no-hitter - and the Los Angeles Dodgers held on to beat the Cincinnati Reds 4-3 Monday.

The Reds hit only three balls out of the infield before Todd Frazier's leadoff double down the left-field line on an 0-1 pitch in the eighth. That followed a three-run seventh by the Dodgers in which Ryu ran the bases and scored.

The left-hander from South Korea came close to making the Dodgers the first team in major league history with consecutive no-hitters. Beckett won 6-0 in Philadelphia on Sunday.

Los Angeles pitchers tossed a club-record 17 straight hitless innings dating to Saturday, when Paul Maholm got it started against the Phillies.

Heat take command of East finals, 102-90

MIAMI (AP) LeBron James had 32 points and 10 rebounds, Chris Bosh added 25 points and the Miami Heat moved one win away from a return trip to the NBA Finals with a 102-90 win over the Indiana Pacers on Monday night.

Dwyane Wade scored 15 points for the Heat, who have won three of the first four games in the Eastern Conference finals. They can win the East for a fourth straight season with a win at Indiana on Wednesday night.

Miami led wire-to-wire, opening up as much as a 23-point lead in the final quarter.

Paul George scored 23 points and David West added 20 points and 12 rebounds for the Pacers, who got 15 points from George Hill. But Lance Stephenson was held to nine and Roy Hibbert was scoreless in 22 minutes for Indiana.

The Pacers won two elimination games in the first round against Atlanta, and need to win three more if their yearlong plan of topping Miami as kings of the East is going to become reality.

The odds are obviously stacked against them. When holding a 3-1 lead, Miami is 8-0 in Game 5s over the past four postseasons.

Much as he did Sunday, Indiana coach Frank Vogel used the big brother-little brother analogy with his team, trying any way to urge the Pacers to break through against the team that has ended their season in each of the past two years.

"He's got to make a decision at some point in his life, that no matter what, we're not going to lose this fight anymore," Vogel said, likening the Pacers to the little brother in that scenario. "We're at that point."

The fight isn't over.

But it was awfully one-sided for long stretches of Game 4.

Miami outscored Indiana 31-20 in the third quarter and increased the lead to 23 in the fourth before the Pacers used a 15-3 run to make things rather interesting. Stephenson had a layup with 3:20 left that would have gotten Indiana within nine - but it was waved off after he was called for fouling Wade on his way to the basket.

Stephenson scored with 1:31 left to make it 99-90, but James snuffed out any comeback hopes right there. His three-point play nine seconds later pushed the lead back to 12, and the Heat were moments away from a 3-1 lead.

Miami was without Chris Andersen, inactive because of a bruised left thigh. The Heat also tweaked their starting lineup, with Rashard Lewis in and Udonis Haslem out.

Bosh scored the game's first eight points, making a pair of 3-pointers and ending a series-long funk. He had scored exactly nine points in each of the first three games of these East finals and was held under 10 points in each of his last seven playoff games against Indiana.

But he came out flying, and probably not coincidentally, the Heat finally had a good start.

They won the first quarter for the first time in the series, going up 27-19 and helped in part by a late 3-pointer from Shane Battier - with replays showing Vogel moved down the sideline toward the Heat forward as he shot from near the Indiana bench.

Nothing was to Indiana's liking. Hibbert and Stephenson combined for zero points and six fouls in the half. The Heat didn't have a turnover until the second quarter. Miami shot 10 more free throws in the half. Bosh and James combined for 32 points.

And despite it all, the Pacers were down only 49-44 at halftime.

After getting hand-checked eight times by Hill on a play late in the half, James went down the lane for a reverse dunk while getting fouled to put Miami up by 10.

But the Pacers answered, a 3-pointer by George just before the break getting them within five and sealing a half that could have been much worse.

If there was any doubt, Miami erased it quickly after halftime. James scored five points in a 7-0 spurt to open the second half, and the Heat were on their way.

NOTES: It was the 74th playoff game where James had at least 25 points, five rebounds and five assists, passing Michael Jordan for the most in NBA history. ... George passed Reggie Miller for the highest scoring single-season (including playoffs) by a player in Pacers history. Miller had 2,078 in 1989-90; George entered Game 4 with 2,077 points. ... Wednesday will be Indiana's 100th game of the season. Only two other Pacers teams have logged that many; they played 105 in 1999-2000 and 100 last season.

Dodgers C Ellis hurt celebrating no-hitter, on DL

LOS ANGELES (AP) Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis went on the 15-day disabled list with a sprained right ankle Monday, a day after getting hurt while celebrating Josh Beckett's no-hitter.

Ellis rushed to join his teammates in the celebration on Sunday in Philadelphia. Around home plate, he stepped on the discarded mask of backup Drew Butera, who caught the majors' first no-hitter of the season.

"I wanted to be a part of it. It's a great day, a great experience to be a part of. I quickly lost my thrill for what happened," Ellis said. "Rolled it pretty good. I'm beyond frustrated, still kind of shocked."

Ellis was scheduled to see the team physician later Monday. He had his ankle treated throughout the flight home, alternating ice and compression.

"Getting off the plane I was feeling really good, but this morning, as they predicted, it was hard moving around once I got up," he said.

It is the second DL stint for Ellis. He was out April 8-May 13 after left knee surgery.

The team recalled catcher Tim Federowicz from Triple-A Albuquerque, where he was hitting .298 in 17 games. He played 13 games for the Dodgers in April.

Manager Don Mattingly said Ellis' injury is poor timing, but that he feels comfortable with either Butera or Federowicz. Butera started Monday night at home against the Cincinnati Reds.

Also out for the Dodgers was shortstop Hanley Ramirez, who missed his fourth straight game because of a lower calf injury.

Rangers a win away from Stanley Cup finals

MONTREAL (AP) When other parts of their game are sputtering, the New York Rangers have two key assets to fall back on - penalty killing and goaltending.

It's a combo that has put them within one victory of their first Stanley Cup final in 20 years. And it has frustrated the Montreal Canadiens, who must win Game 5 Tuesday at the Bell Centre to stave off elimination.

Against the Rangers, the Canadiens are 1 for 17 with the man advantage.

Montreal's lone power-play goal came Sunday night in a 3-2 overtime loss at Madison Square Garden. That P.K. Subban blast from the point, however, was tempered by a short-handed goal by Carl Hagelin that opened the scoring.

The Canadiens' power play went 1 for 8 on a night when the Rangers spent 14 1/2 minutes or almost 22 percent of the game a man short.

"Give credit to our killers and our goaltender," Rangers coach Alain Vigneault said. "They did a real good job."

That is nothing new. Before Subban's goal, the Rangers had killed off 27 straight penalties. New York is 37 for 39 (95 percent) on the penalty kill in its past 12 games

"We had the opportunity on the power play but we didn't take advantage of it," Montreal coach Michel Therrien. "Yes, we scored a goal. It was a tying goal, but we gave up one, and that was the story of the game. I thought our power play had to be better."

The Rangers' go-to forward pairing on the penalty kill is Hagelin and Brian Boyle. Hagelin uses his speed while Boyle's resume reads "big body, blocks shots, good on faceoffs," according to Vigneault.

Boyle can also pass a bit, finding Hagelin on a pass deep from the New York end. Hagelin broke in alone, faked a shot and tucked a backhand between the legs of Dustin Tokarski at 7:18 for his sixth goal of the playoffs. It was the Rangers' first short-handed goal in 70 playoff games, dating to 2008.

The New York penalty kill is smart and sleek. Goalie Henrik Lundqvist has worked hard on his puck handling and his defenders are positioned well.

"I think our guys do a good job whether it be on the forecheck coming back in the right positions and trying to create those battles where you've a chance to make a couple plays and get it out," Vigneault said. "When we don't, (our) goaltender stops the puck."

In four games, Montreal has seven goals on 107 shots.

While Tokarski has won kudos for his play in stepping in for the injured Carey Price, Lundqvist's playoffs numbers are sparkling - a .931 save percentage and 1.98 goals-against average.

The Canadiens are going to need Tokarski to continue to play well if they want to extend their season.

"It's no secret: you start doing the right things, you start getting rewarded for it and momentum builds," captain Brian Gionta said. "You keep carrying that.

"A couple of teams have been able to do that this year, the Kings and the Rangers. So it's not something that can't be done and with the group we have in here, we believe we can do it. And we believe we've got better as the series goes on."

Gionta and Tomas Plekanec were part of a Canadiens team that came back from a 3-1 deficit to upset the Washington Capitals en route to their previous trip to the conference final in 2010.

And they remain without Price, the Canadian gold medalist from the Sochi Olympics in February who suffered a possible right knee injury when New York's Chris Kreider crashed the net in the second period of the series opener.

Price skated for about 20 minutes without equipment before the team's optional practice, but Therrien said he will not be back in this series.

For Gionta, hope comes from a feeling that his team is getting better and still has time to turn things around, as they did when they fell behind 3-2 to the Bruins in the conference semifinal.

The Canadiens rebounded with their best game of the playoffs in Game 6 and closed it out in Boston two days later.

"We were able to wear (Boston's) defense down with our speed and forechecking," he said. "We need to get better at that and I think that's what we've gotten better at as (the New York series) went on.

"Try to take advantage of their defensemen down low, try to spend some time in the offensive zone, and start to make breakdowns and make things happen that way. Our backs are against the wall. It's win or go home. I would expect the same kind of effort as we had against Boston for sure."

Beating Lundqvist three straight times will be tough. He has 41 career playoff wins, tying him with Mike Richter for the most in Rangers history. His counterpart, Tokarski has played all of 13 NHL games - 10 in the regular season and three in the playoffs.

Lundqvist picked up an assist on Derick Brassard's second-period goal, his first in 85 postseason games. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, he is the first Rangers goaltender to record a playoff assist since Richter on May 11, 1997.

The Rangers have allowed two goals or fewer in 13 of their 18 playoff games, including six of the past seven games.

One question for the Rangers will be whether Derek Stepan can return from his broken jaw in Game 3. Over the weekend, he dropped by the arena to see his teammates before returning home to recuperate from surgery.

Martin St. Louis is on a roll for the Rangers. His overtime winner Sunday extended his point streak to six games. He leads the Rangers with 13 points in these playoffs.

NOTE: The Rangers are 12-1 when they lead a playoff series 3-1.

Caps hire Trotz as coach, make MacLellan new GM

After missing the playoffs for the first time in seven years, the Washington Capitals hired former Nashville Predators coach Barry Trotz and promoted Brian MacLellan to general manager on Monday.

Trotz was the Predators' coach for 15 seasons before being dropped from the job in April. In Washington, he takes over for Adam Oates, who was fired last month with a season left on his three-year deal.

MacLellan replaces George McPhee, whose contract was not renewed after 17 seasons as the Capitals' GM.

In the team's press release announcing Monday's moves, owner Ted Leonsis said Trotz was "the only coach we coveted" and called him "an ideal fit to help lead our club."

It's a change in philosophy for the Capitals in terms of picking a coach: Each of McPhee's choices for the job had never previously been a head coach in the NHL.

Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin has won three league MVP awards and again led the NHL in scoring this season with 51 goals. But the Capitals haven't made it past the second round of the playoffs during the Russian wing's career.

"Barry's teams have always played with structure, discipline and intensity, and I look forward to him leading us to success for many years to come," said MacLellan, who also gets the title of senior vice president.

MacLellan has been with Washington for 13 seasons, seven as assistant GM. He was with five clubs during a 10-year NHL playing career.

"After conducting an extensive search for a general manager, we determined that Brian was the best candidate to help us reach our ultimate goal, winning the Stanley Cup," Leonsis said. "We have witnessed his abilities firsthand, and we have tremendous respect for how he manages people and situations."

Trotz and MacLellan will be introduced at a news conference Tuesday.

When Leonsis held a news conference in late April to discuss the dismissals of McPhee and Oates, the owner said: "I just felt that new leadership at this time was needed, and let's start it with a clean slate."

From 1992-97, Trotz coached the Capitals' top minor league affiliate in the American Hockey League. He was hired by the Predators in August 1997, when the club was preparing for its expansion season of 1998-99.

Before leaving Nashville, Trotz had been the league's longest-tenured coach with one team.

"We are getting an experienced and well-respected coach whose presence and tutelage will benefit our players," Capitals President Dick Patrick said.

His Predators contract was set to expire at the end of June, and that club offered him a job in their hockey operations department. But Trotz - a finalist for the Jack Adams award as the top coach in the NHL twice in the past five seasons - made clear at the time that he wanted to keep coaching.

The Predators failed to make the playoffs each of the past two seasons.

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Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich

Hunter-Reay proud to be IndyCar's American star

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Ryan Hunter-Reay was deeply disappointed when his 2012 championship was overshadowed by IndyCar politics. His breakthrough moment was largely ignored by the league as it fought with yet another CEO.

It was a lost opportunity for a series starving for an American star, a role Hunter-Reay has desperately wanted to fill. He would knock on doors, shake hands and kiss babies if IndyCar asked, but no one ever did.

Now he's an Indianapolis 500 winner, just the sixth American driver in 20 years to claim that title. When Tony George created IndyCar in 1996, he said it was a series that would give American drivers a chance to succeed. But Hunter-Reay is just the fourth American to win at Indianapolis Motor Speedway since George launched his league, and he's the first red, white and blue draped driver to win since 2006.

So maybe this win, the biggest by far of his career, will be the boost Hunter-Reay needs to raise his profile and that of the series he loves.

"I'm real. I'm genuine. There's not a whole lot theatrics about me," Hunter-Reay said Monday, a day after he nipped Helio Castroneves at the line to win Indy.

"I'm not going to put on a whole big show and jump through hoops. I'm going to be me, and I am thrilled to be here. I'm a hard-charging American and I've had to fight every step of my career for this ride."

That was the story that should have been told in 2012, when Hunter-Reay, who had been out of work six years earlier, reeled off three consecutive wins to climb into the championship race. Then, facing elimination, he won again to send his title fight with Will Power into the finale, where Hunter-Reay walked away with his first championship.

It was a career year and came a season after one of the lowest points of his career: He failed to qualify for the 2011 Indianapolis 500 and Andretti Autosport had to buy a seat from A.J. Foyt to get Hunter-Reay into the race.

But IndyCar management was too busy planning the ouster of CEO Randy Bernard to focus on Hunter-Reay, and when Bernard was cut loose a month after the championship, the driver was completely forgotten.

"Yeah, I was overlooked in 2012. The series wanted an American champion and we had one," he said. "Randy was moving out and the search for a new CEO was on, and I don't really think that's big news or anything, but it definitely took precedence.

"This win, I hope it does breakthrough. I'll be a great and honest champion. I'll fly the flag for our sport and you'll always get the real deal with me."

A casting director could not have chosen a more perfect fit for the role with IndyCar. Hunter-Reay and wife Beccy Gordon, younger sister of American stalwart driver Robby Gordon, could be mistaken for Ken and Barbie. Their towheaded toddler Ryden, wearing a miniature firesuit to match his father's, has been the star of the victory celebrations. He looked on quizzically while his parents kissed the bricks after the win, then ran up and down the race track - toy cars in hand - Monday as his father posed for photos.

When he needed to be entertained, Ryden played with the faces on the Borg-Warner trophy.

One of the perks the Hunter-Reays will receive for his victory is a replica of the pace car, a black 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z28.

Hunter-Reay's first car? A black Camaro, of course.

"I'm really looking forward to getting that back home. It's a car that I'll definitely use - that thing sounded mean," he said. "That's the great thing about this race. You win the race, and then you start thinking about all the things that come with it. I get my face on the trophy. And the pace car, and the check that comes with it. I was presented with an Indianapolis 500 1911 pistol. How cool is that? How American is that?

"And I got a huge belt buckle, so I need a holster with my belt buckle and I'll be strutting around the garages with that."

Hunter-Reay is game for playing the role IndyCar wants and needs. He draped himself in the American flag, noted the significance of winning on Memorial Day weekend, and spoke repeatedly about his national pride.

What he failed to mention is that Sunday's victory moved him to the top of the IndyCar points standings. And he didn't brag about one of his daredevil passes for the lead, the one in which he nearly drove into the grass.

The irony, of course, is that just a month ago Hunter-Reay was criticized for an aggressive move at Long Beach that backfired and wrecked several race cars.

If Hunter-Reay has his way, those moves will work every time and his legacy as a tough, hard, American racer will be cemented.

"I am aggressive and will always go for it. When I was growing up, I really loved the drivers that were like that," he said. "I'm married to Beccy, I was a big fan of Robby. He was always the guy that you wanted to watch. He was coming through, one way or the other. He might not finish, but he's coming through.

"We've got a championship to go win this year, for sure. I'll probably still go 110 percent and be aggressive and I'm not going to let up in any way."

Ortiz, Red Sox end 10-game skid, rally past Braves

ATLANTA (AP) David Ortiz homered and drove in four runs as the Boston Red Sox ended their 10-game losing streak, rallying from a five-run deficit to defeat the Atlanta Braves 8-6 on Monday.

The defending World Series champions trailed 6-1 after the fourth, with starter Clay Buchholz walking a career-high eight in only three-plus innings.

But Ortiz tied it by hitting a three-run homer off Ervin Santana in the fifth. With Red Sox fans at Turner Field chanting "Papi! Papi!" the World Series MVP then gave Boston the lead with a bases-loaded sacrifice fly off Ian Thomas (1-2) in the seventh.

Following pregame declarations of confidence from manager John Farrell and general manager Ben Cherington, the Red Sox came back to end their worst skid since an 11-game slide in 1994.

Redskins promote Bruce Allen to president, GM

ASHBURN, Va. (AP) Bruce Allen is now officially upgraded to president and general manager of the Washington Redskins.

Previously, Allen held the GM title but was an executive vice president.

In a press release issued by the team on Monday, owner Dan Snyder says "I think the world of Bruce Allen and giving him both titles is appropriate."

Allen was hired by the Redskins in December 2009, after spending time with the Buccaneers and Raiders in the NFL, as well as USFL clubs.

Last week, Allen said in a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid that the team's nickname is "respectful" toward Native Americans. That followed half the U.S. Senate publicly urging NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to change the club's name, saying it is a racist slur.

Thunder's Serge Ibaka OK after return from injury

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) So far, so good for Serge Ibaka's comeback.

The Thunder forward said Monday that his strained left calf is feeling fine, and he expects to be able to play Tuesday in Game 4 of the Western Conference finals.

Ibaka came back from what was thought to be a season-ending injury to play 30 minutes in Game 3 against San Antonio. He had 15 points, seven rebounds and four blocks to help Oklahoma City beat the Spurs 106-97 Sunday night and trim their deficit in the series to 2-1.

Ibaka said he felt no worse on Monday than the night before. He said it was a struggle during the game, but he stayed loose and was able to deal with the pain.

"It was kind of hard a little bit with my feet," he said. "I was using more my right foot than left foot. I could not do too much last night. After we saw the video, I felt like I was slow."

If that was Ibaka's version of not doing much, San Antonio might have a problem. The Spurs won the first two games by a combined 52 points, but with Ibaka, Oklahoma City dominated on Sunday and led by 20 with just over three minutes to go.

"I love what he did," Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. "I love the determination that he played with. That's something that he's done all along. That was a great, great game by him. He impacted the game both ends of the floor."

Ibaka isn't worried about re-injuring the calf or making it worse. His single concern is being on the floor for his team.

"When we sign here in the NBA, we sign on everything, man," he said. "At the end of the day, no matter what happened last night ... I signed for this."

The Spurs said they have more problems than Ibaka. They said to win Tuesday, they need to improve their shooting, rebounding and penetration.

"We just need to play better, shoot the ball better," Spurs forward Tim Duncan said. "Just continue to attack and be more aggressive and try to get to the basket, get to the free throw line, just get them on their heels a little bit. I think we got on our heels too much, and the result was what it was."

The Spurs also need to keep Oklahoma City off the free-throw line. The Thunder outscored the Spurs 26-15 from the line on Sunday as Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant both went 8-for-8. Westbrook and Durant had combined for just 17 free-throw attempts in the first two games combined.

"The disparity in free throws really shows a sign of aggressiveness," San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich said. "It's about the game. It's about how you play."

The Thunder made several key changes for Game 3 that did not involve Ibaka. Backup point guard Reggie Jackson started and scored 15 points, adding another scoring threat to take pressure off Durant and Westbrook. Steven Adams, a rookie center, had seven points, nine rebounds and four blocks in 30 minutes. Guard Thabo Sefolosha and forward Nick Collison, who started the first two games of the series, didn't play at all.

Brooks, who rarely makes lineup changes, wasn't sure why this particular set of decisions worked so well. He said more adjustments might be forthcoming.

"I have confidence in the different styles that we can play, big or small, so whoever we play, you've got to play with five guys, and whoever we decide, I have confidence, the team has confidence," he said.

Oklahoma City outrebounded the Spurs 52-36 on Sunday after getting outrebounded by three in Game 1 and 15 in Game 2.

Sunday, for the first time in the series, San Antonio's offense sputtered. San Antonio shot 40 percent from the field after shooting at least 50 percent in Games 1 and 2. Ginobili scored 23 points on Sunday and Duncan scored 16 points, but no other Spurs scored more than 10.

Tony Parker struggled with Westbrook's and Jackson's improved defense. Parker made just 4 of 13 shots and had nine points, four assists and four turnovers.

"I take a lot of responsibility," Parker said. "That's my job on this team, to get everything going. That's why I took it hard last night, because I felt like I didn't play well."

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Follow Cliff Brunt on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CliffBruntAP .

Rafael Nadal wins for the 60th time at French Open

PARIS (AP) Rafael Nadal earned his 60th victory in 61 matches at the French Open on Monday, beating Robby Ginepri of the United States 6-0, 6-3, 6-0.

Nadal has won eight titles at Roland Garros, with his lone loss at the tournament coming in the fourth round in 2009. If he wins this year, he will become the first man to win five straight at the clay-court major.

Nadal played his opening match on Court Suzanne Lenglen, the second biggest stadium at the French Open.

St. Louis' OT goal lifts Rangers over Habs

NEW YORK (AP) Martin St. Louis put New York within one win of the Stanley Cup finals, scoring 6:02 into overtime to give the Rangers a 3-2 victory over the Montreal Canadiens in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals Sunday night.

A loose puck came to St. Louis, the Rangers' inspirational postseason leader, alone in the right circle and he fired a snap shot over goalie Dustin Tokarski's shoulder.

The Rangers, who lead the series 3-1, were forced to overtime for the second straight game despite holding a pair of one-goal leads. New York lost Game 3 at home.

Carl Hagelin put the Rangers in front with a short-handed goal in the first period, and Derick Brassard made it 2-1 in the second. Hagelin also assisted on St. Louis' goal.

Francis Bouillon tied it in the second, and fellow defenseman P.K. Subban made it 2-2 in the third with a power-play goal. David Desharnais assisted on both for Montreal.

Thunder beat Spurs 106-97, cut deficit to 2-1

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Serge Ibaka scored 15 points in a dramatic return from what was thought to be a season-ending left calf strain to help the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the San Antonio Spurs 106-97 on Sunday night in Game 3 of the Western Conference finals.

Russell Westbrook had 26 points, eight rebounds and seven assists, and Kevin Durant added 25 points and 10 rebounds to help the Thunder cut the Spurs' lead in the series to 2-1.

Ibaka started after missing the first two games of the series. The Thunder had said he likely would miss the rest of the playoffs, but the team changed course Friday.

Manu Ginobili scored 23 points and Tim Duncan added 16 points and eight rebounds for the Spurs.

Game 4 is Tuesday night at Oklahoma City.

Johnson ends drought at Coca-Cola 600

CONCORD, N.C. (AP) Defending Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson passed Matt Kenseth with nine laps to go and won the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday night for his first victory of the season.

Johnson was dominant at Charlotte Motor Speedway, winning the pole Thursday night and leading 165 of 400 laps in NASCAR's longest race. He won for the record seventh time at the track and 67th time overall.

Kevin Harvick was second, followed by Kenseth and Carl Edwards. Jamie McMurray, the All-Star race winner last weekend at the track, was fifth.

Kurt Busch's attempt at motorsports history ended with 129 laps to go when he blew an engine. Busch finished sixth in the Indianapolis 500, but could not complete the 600.

Hunter-Reay holds off Castroneves to win Indy 500

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Ryan Hunter-Reay peeked around Helio Castroneves, then reversed course and dipped inside for a daredevil pass and the lead in the Indianapolis 500.

Castroneves charged back to the front, winning a drag race down the frontstretch at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. And then, in a stirring wheel-to-wheel battle between a pair of bright yellow cars, Hunter-Reay seized the lead once more Sunday as the drivers hurtled across the Yard of Bricks with a single, 2.5-mile lap remaining.

With nobody in front of him, Hunter-Reay used the entire track to keep Castroneves in his rearview mirror. He nipped him at the line by less than half a car length, denying his Brazilian rival a chance at history Sunday and becoming the first American in eight years to win the Indy 500.

"The Greatest Spectacle in Racing" had lived up to its nickname.

"This race was ridiculously close and competitive," Hunter-Reay said. "Just glad I picked the right time to go."

The finish was well worth the wait - to the fans who watched 150 laps of caution-free racing, to the drivers who bided their time unsure of when they should charge to the front and to Hunter-Reay, who finally got to drink the celebratory milk in his seventh try. He beat Castroneves by just 0.060 seconds - only the 1992 race had a closer finish when Al Unser Jr. beat Scott Goodyear by 0.043 seconds.

"I'm a proud American boy, that's for sure," Hunter-Reay said in Victory Lane before he was joined by his wife and son. "I've watched this race since I was sitting in diapers on the floor in front of the TV. My son did it today. He watched me here. I'm thrilled. This is American history, this race. This is American tradition."

He was serenaded by chants of "USA! USA!" as he made his way around the post-race celebrations. He was joined by son Ryden, born shortly after Hunter-Reay's 2012 IndyCar championship and wearing a miniature version of his father's firesuit as his parents kissed the bricks.

Castroneves, trying to become the fourth driver to win a fourth Indianapolis 500, settled for second. He needed several moments to compose himself, slumped in his car, head down and helmet on. The Brazilian said a caution with 10 laps to go broke his rhythm as red flag came out so track workers could clean debris and repair a track wall.

"It was a great fight," he smiled. "I tell you what, I was having a great time. Unfortunately, second. It's good, but second sucks, you know what I mean?"

Marco Andretti finished third and Carlos Munoz was fourth as Andretti Autosport had three cars in the top four, as well as the winner.

Kurt Busch, also in a Honda for Andretti, finished sixth in his first race of the day. He left immediately for a flight after the race and arrived about an hour later in North Carolina for Sunday night's Coca-Cola 600, where his attempt to become the second driver to complete 1,100 miles in both races on the same day ended when his car blew an engine late.

Busch ended up completing about 907 miles.

"All in all, I'm very pleased. I cannot believe the execution of this team," Busch said before hustling away for a helicopter ride to his waiting plane. "I tried to enjoy it. My throat's real dry because I was smiling the whole time and the fresh air was coming in my mouth."

Marco Andretti appeared to have a shot at the win, but after the final restart he never could mix it up with Hunter-Reay and Castroneves as the two leaders swapped position four times in the final five laps. So certain his son would be a contender for the victory Sunday, Michael Andretti was just as thrilled with Hunter-Reay's win.

"Ryan's just been a huge part of our team, a great guy, a friend," said Michael Andretti, who won for the third time as a team owner. "He deserves it. He deserves to have his face on that trophy. If it couldn't be Marco, he's the next guy I wanted."

A year ago, Hunter-Reay was passed for the lead with three laps remaining and went on to finish third as the race finished under caution. He was leading Sunday and had control of the race until Townsend Bell's crash brought out the red flag. Hunter-Reay figured he was a sitting duck as the leader, his chances over.

"I can't get a break," he lamented on his team radio.

But after swapping the lead with Castroneves three times, including a dramatic inside move in Turn 3, Hunter-Reay made the final and decisive pass as the two cars took the white flag.

"At the end of the day there's stupid and bravery, and I think we were right there on the edge, both of us," Castroneves said. "I'm glad we both come out in a good way. I'm sad it did not come out the way I wanted."

The race went a record 150 laps without a caution as the pace zipped along and Busch at one point had no worries at all about getting to North Carolina in time for NASCAR's longest event of the year. Then a Charlie Kimball spin brought out the first yellow, a crash by Scott Dixon led to a second caution and a risky three-wide move on the next restart caused pole-sitter Ed Carpenter and James Hinchcliffe to wreck.

Carpenter was livid, calling out Hinchcliffe for an "amateur" move.

"The moment when Hinch decided to make it three-wide was more than any of us could handle," Carpenter said. "I told him if he didn't have a concussion last week I would have punched him in the face."

Hinchcliffe, cleared to drive last weekend after suffering a concussion two weeks ago in the Grand Prix of Indianapolis, accepted responsibility.

"I was the last guy on the scene," he said. "I have to take the blame, for sure. I feel really bad for (Carpenter) because he had a great month and was doing a great job."

The race resumed and Hunter-Reay was in control until the fourth and final caution, which led IndyCar to throw a rare red flag to allow the drivers a chance to race to the finish.

"It went green the whole way and I love that," Hunter-Reay said. "Winning it under green like that with just a fantastic finish - I hope the fans loved it because I was on the edge of my seat."

Donovan breaks MLS goal record

CARSON, Calif. (AP) Landon Donovan broke the Major League Soccer goal record Sunday night, scoring his 135th and 136th regular-season goals in the Los Angeles Galaxy's 4-1 victory over the Philadelphia Union.

Playing for the first time since being cut from the U.S. World Cup team, Donovan broke a tie with Jeff Cunningham in the 49th minute with his first goal in four games this season, then added another in the 81st. Donovan also holds the MLS playoff record with 22 goals.

Donovan scored his first goal on a counterattack, passing to Robbie Keane, who took the ball into the Union box and fed Donovan at the left post for an easy finish. After making it 4-0 in the 81st, Donovan was replaced by a substitute a minute later.

Donovan has played 307 regular-season games in 15 seasons. The Jamaican-born Cunningham, a former U.S. national team player, played in 365 games over 14 seasons with Columbus, Colorado, Real Salt Lake, Toronto FC and FC Dallas. He last played in MLS in 2011.

Donovan is No. 2 on the league's career assists list with 120, including one on Leonardo's second-minute header Sunday. Steve Ralston, a Houston Dynamo assistant coach who retired in 2010, has the record with 135.

Donovan also set up Los Angeles' first goal, delivering a free kick that Leonardo headed home in the second minute. Keane scored a third in the 64th minute after a turnover by Union defender Sheanon Williams.

Los Angeles (4-3-3) won consecutive games for the second time this season.

Philadelphia (2-7-5), which welcomed back midfielder Maurice Edu - also one of seven players trimmed from the 30-man World Cup preliminary roster - lost its second game in a row and fifth in the last six outings. The Union have won just once in their last dozen games.

Edu scored for Philadelphia in the 88th minute, converting a penalty kick after Raul Mendiola fouled Zach Pfeffer.

Red Sox lose 10th straight, brawl with Tampa Bay

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) The World Series champion Boston Red Sox lost their 10th straight game, skidding to their longest slump in 20 years and brawling with the Tampa Bay Rays during an 8-5 defeat Sunday.

Rays pinch-hitter Sean Rodriguez connected for a tiebreaking, three-run homer in the seventh. Yunel Escobar hit a two-run double later in the inning and then took third on defensive indifference, setting off the fracas.

Escobar, Rodriguez and Boston's Jonny Gomes were all ejected.

This is Boston's worst losing streak since an 11-gamer from June 8-19, 1994. The Red Sox have been outscored 52-24 over their last 10 games.

Beckett pitches no-hitter, Dodgers stop Phillies

PHILADELPHIA (AP) Josh Beckett pitched the first no-hitter of his stellar career and the first in the majors this season, leading the Los Angeles Dodgers over the Philadelphia Phillies 6-0 on Sunday.

Beckett struck out six, walked three and didn't come close to allowing a hit against a lineup that included two former NL MVPs and four former All-Stars.

The 34-year-old right-hander, whose career was almost derailed by recent injuries, pitched the first no-hitter in the majors since Miami's Henderson Alvarez did it against Detroit on the final day of the 2013 season.

Beckett became the first visiting pitcher to throw a no-hitter in Philadelphia since Montreal's Bill Stoneman stopped the Phillies on April 17, 1969, at Connie Mack Stadium.

Report: T-Wolves want Joerger as coach

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) The Minnesota Timberwolves have decided they want to bring Dave Joerger home to be their coach. Now all that stands in the way is agreeing on a contract and any possible compensation with the Memphis Grizzlies.

The Timberwolves decided on Joerger as the replacement for Rick Adelman on Saturday night after the Minnesota-born Grizzlies coach met with team leadership, including owner Glen Taylor, two people with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press.

Joerger, who went 50-32 in his first season as coach of the Grizzlies and helped the team to the seventh seed in the Western Conference playoff field, is still under contract for two more years in Memphis. But owner Robert Pera is believed to be considering a coaching change after he recently fired CEO Jason Levien and director of player personnel Stu Lash, and it remained unclear just how much the Timberwolves want to give to the Grizzlies for a coach many presume could be fired any day.

Joerger, who is from Staples and went to college at Minnesota State, Moorhead, met with Timberwolves president of basketball operations Flip Saunders on Thursday, then with several Wolves officials, including Taylor, for a second interview on Saturday evening.

It's clear he made quite an impression, because the Wolves decided shortly after the second meeting to zero in on him over other candidates including former Raptors coach and Timberwolves player Sam Mitchell and Lionel Hollins, who was replaced by Joerger in Memphis before this season.

The 40-year-old Joerger got to know Saunders as a young man trying to break into the coaching ranks when he was allowed to sit on several training camp practices for the Timberwolves, who were coached by Saunders from 1995-2005. He then followed a similar career path to Saunders, winning five championships while coaching in the International Basketball Association, the CBA and the NBDL before breaking into the NBA as an assistant with the Grizzlies seven years ago.

After the Grizzlies lost to San Antonio in the Western Conference finals last year, Joerger took over for the dismissed Hollins and impressed with his ability to adjust his schemes and philosophies to the talent on his roster, and do it on the fly. The Grizzlies started this season 10-15, prompting Joerger to ditch the more open offensive style he was trying to institute on a team that struggled to score in the halfcourt for the slower-paced, "Grit `n' Grind" style that became the Grizzlies' hallmark under Hollins.

But a seven-game slugfest with the Thunder in the first round wasn't enough to convince Pera that the team was headed in the right direction, and the uncertainty surrounding his job, coupled with the prospects of returning home to coach under Saunders, hold great appeal for Joerger.

Saunders has always had an affinity for coaches who have had to grind their way to the top through the backwaters of minor league basketball and he is also intrigued by Joerger's enthusiasm for the job even given the uncertain status of star forward Kevin Love, who can opt out of his contract after next season.

Love's situation has given several higher profile candidates pause, but Joerger still fits the profile of an energetic coach who has had success as a head coach that Saunders is looking for to take over a team that has not made the playoffs since 2004.

Joerger grew up in tiny Staples, about 150 miles northwest of Minneapolis, an upbringing that no doubt appealed to Taylor, a small-town Minnesotan himself.

But more than place of birth, Joerger's successful background as a basketball lifer who would prefer to play an up-tempo style of game no doubt helped push him over the top in the eyes of Taylor and Saunders, who were in search of an experienced coach with a willingness to play a free-flowing system that would fit a team with Ricky Rubio at point guard and, for now, Love at power forward.

Love has spent his first six seasons in Minnesota and has yet to make the playoffs, which leads many to believe he will leave the Timberwolves for the chance to join a team ready to contend.

That could prompt the Wolves to trade the face of the franchise, either this summer or before the February trade deadline, rather than risk letting him walk without receiving compensation.

Those involved didn't believe negotiating a contract would be much of an issue between the Wolves and Joerger. But if Pera tries to play hardball and insist on significant compensation in the form of draft picks, the process could take a little longer.

Heat rally late, beat Pacers 99-87 in Game 3

MIAMI (AP) LeBron James scored 26 points and Dwyane Wade added 23 as the Miami Heat shook off a horrid start to beat the Indiana Pacers 99-87 on Saturday in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals.

Ray Allen added 16 points and led a late-game charge for the Heat, who lead the best-of-seven series 2-1. Game 4 is Monday night in Miami.

The Heat trailed by 15 in the first half and never led until early in the third quarter.

Paul George scored 17 points for Indiana, shooting 5 for 13 in his return after being concussed late in Game 2. Roy Hibbert scored 16 points, David West added 13 and Lance Stephenson had 10 for the Pacers.

Miami started the game 2 for 10 from the floor. The Heat then made 21 of their next 31 shots, including eight straight in the third quarter that gave the two-time defending NBA champions their first lead.

James' dunk with 7:36 remaining in the third put Miami up for the first time, 52-51. That was the first of nine lead changes in the quarter, before the Heat did what coach Erik Spoelstra implored his team to do in a pregame locker room address.

"Impose our identity," Spoelstra said.

Eventually, the message reached the Heat, and their two best players led the way.

James' 3-pointer with 1:21 left in the third put Miami up 67-63, then its biggest lead of the night. Wade subbed in for James with 5.7 seconds left because the four-time MVP was dealing with what appeared to be a hamstring cramp and connected on a 3-pointer with 1.4 ticks remaining for a 74-67 lead going into the fourth.

James retreated toward the locker room at that point, stopping halfway down the hallway known as "Championship Alley" while trainer Mike Mancias stretched him out. Meanwhile, Wade - not exactly known for behind-the-arc prowess - opened the fourth quarter with another 3, the Heat were up 10 and the floodgates were opening.

Indiana got to 76-74 before Allen made a 3-pointer, and with that, the tone was set for the final minutes. Allen made three 3s in the final 5:59, the last of those putting Miami up by 15.

And with that, it became clear that Indiana was going to lose for the second time in Miami this season after leading by 15. It also happened on Dec. 18.

The halftime score looked ugly: Pacers 42, Heat 38.

That didn't even come close to describing how much Miami struggled at times. Here's one example: After 11 minutes, it was Hibbert 10, Heat 10.

Indiana got nine points off turnovers in the opening quarter, led 19-5 with 2:42 left in the period and still held a 21-14 edge entering the second - even though Miami had just peeled off a 9-2 run to make things look at least somewhat respectable.

James started the second quarter for just the seventh time in his 89 games played this season, a sign of how desperate the Heat seemed to not let the game become a total runaway.

Carter leads Kings past Chicago 4-3 in West final

LOS ANGELES (AP) Jeff Carter had a goal and two assists, Tyler Toffoli scored the tiebreaking goal late in the second period, and the Los Angeles Kings beat the Chicago Blackhawks 4-3 on Saturday night to take a 2-1 lead in the Western Conference finals.

Drew Doughty had a third-period goal and an assist, and Jonathan Quick made 24 saves as the Kings returned to Staples Center with an impressive two-way effort against the defending Stanley Cup champions.

Captain Jonathan Toews scored twice in the first period for the Blackhawks, but they didn't score again until Patrick Sharp's goal with 5 seconds left.

Corey Crawford stopped 28 shots for the Blackhawks, who have lost the first road game in 10 consecutive playoff series since 2010.

Game 4 is Monday night at Staples Center.

Slava Voynov scored an early power-play goal as the Kings moved halfway to their second Stanley Cup final in three years.

Three days after the Kings evened the series by scoring six consecutive goals in the final 22 minutes of Game 2, Los Angeles didn't relax and rely on its NHL-best defense.

Neither team played conservatively despite the stakes, instead trading tantalizing scoring chances for the first two periods. The Kings kept pushing for goals even while leading in the third, recording 18 shots and keeping the talented Blackhawks stuck in their own end for long stretches.

Los Angeles got another monster game from the line led by Carter, the imposing goal-scorer who had four points in the third period of Game 2. In a 6:11 span of the second period of Game 3, Carter scored the tying goal off Tanner Pearson's pass before setting up the go-ahead score by Toffoli, who has a goal in every game of the conference finals.

After Toews stressed the importance of playing with some anger in Game 3, the Canadian Olympian produced his first multigoal performance in 63 playoff games since May 7, 2010, when he had a hat trick against Vancouver.

The Blackhawks beat Los Angeles in five games in the conference finals last season, but the rematch hasn't been nearly as smooth for Chicago. Patrick Kane and Bryan Bickell haven't score a goal in the conference finals, while Sharp's last-gasp goal was his first of the series.

The Blackhawks had their usual hundreds of red-clad fans in an otherwise black-and-white Staples Center crowd, and Toews put Chicago ahead just 5:26 into Game 3 with a spectacular unassisted goal, stealing the puck from Justin Williams and beating Quick between the legs.

Just 50 seconds later, Voynov skated into the slot and beat Crawford with a slap shot. Voynov, a target of criticism from Kings fans this season, hadn't scored since the Kings' first-round opener 37 days ago.

Toews connected again later in the period on a rebound of Michal Rozsival's shot after a prolonged period of puck possession.

After surviving a long period of Chicago pressure, the Kings evened it in the second period when Pearson corralled a puck that hit a referee behind the net and fed it to Carter in front for his eighth goal.

Carter then chipped the puck ahead to Toffoli shortly after a Chicago power play ended. Toffoli broke in on Crawford, who lifted his left pad for only an instant - right when Toffoli pushed the puck under him.

The Kings kept up the pressure in the third period, and Doughty scored just his second goal of the postseason shortly after a power play expired in the third period.

NOTES: F Andrew Shaw returned to Chicago's lineup after a seven-game injury absence. He took the lineup spot of Peter Regin, who had played the last four games. ... Each player on the Carter-Toffoli-Pearson line is averaging at least one point per game over the past four games. ... Guitarist Slash played the national anthem. Wayne Gretzky, Dick Butkus, David Beckham, Eric Stonestreet, Josh Duhamel, Taylor Kitsch and former Kings forward Dustin Penner attended the game.

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