National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Florida St faces investigation after Winston case

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) A federal query into whether Florida State University adequately investigated whether Heisman Trophy-winner Jameis Winston sexually assaulted another student could result in the school losing federal funding, but history suggests a settlement will be reached instead, officials said Friday.

The woman who accused the quarterback of raping her in 2012 filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, which decided the university should be investigated for possible Title IX violations over the way it responds to sexual violence complaints. After an investigation by Tallahassee police and prosecutors, officials announced in December that Winston would not be charged.

Title IX is a federal statute that bans discrimination at schools that receive federal funding. The department in 2011 warned schools of their legal responsibilities to immediately investigate allegations of sexual assault, even if the criminal investigation has not concluded. Winston's accuser said FSU did not do that.

Department of Education spokesman Jim Bradshaw said Friday it has been more than 10 years since a school has lost federal funding for failing to comply with Title IX or needed other enforcement measures. He said if a problem is found, an agreement is usually reached with the university to take measures to ensure compliance with legal standards and improve procedures.

He said there is no set format for a civil rights investigation and the scope varies depending on the circumstances. The investigation could look at multiple reports of sexual assault at a university to see how they were handled. The department normally requests copies of policies, procedures and other paperwork to review and also conducts in-person interviews.

Florida State officials have confirmed the federal investigation but have declined comment, citing federal and state privacy laws.

Erin Buzuvis, a professor at the Western New England University School of Law who specializes in Title IX, said the threat of losing federal funding is what forces schools to comply.

Last year, the State University of New York agreed to several guidelines, including having a Title IX coordinator at each of its 29 campuses and conducting sexual assault investigations promptly instead of waiting for the conclusion of a criminal investigation.

Also last year, the University of Montana in Missoula agreed to revise its policies, procedures and investigative practices. It is also agreed to a monitoring program in which it provides copies of annual assessments and other required documents. The agreement lasts three years.

Buzuvis said the Montana case is the blueprint for most agreements.

"It's not meant to be comfortable," Buzuvis said. "There's some level of intrusion that comes with having to venture into one of these agreements."

The woman who accused Winston told university police investigators she had been at a bar with friends, had several drinks and her memory of what happened next wasn't clear. She said she got into a cab with a man, went to his off-campus apartment and, over her objections, he had sex with her. She couldn't remember where the apartment was. The campus police turned the investigation over to the Tallahassee police.

A month later, the woman identified her alleged attacker as Winston. Her family accused Tallahassee detectives of delaying the investigation and discouraging her from going forward with the case because of the public attention it would receive at the university in the city.

The Associated Press generally does not identify those who say they were sexually assaulted.

The department has defended its handling of the case, but didn't turn its evidence over to Willie Meggs, the local state attorney, until mid-November, about the same time journalists began looking into rumors that Winston had been accused of rape.

On Dec. 5, Meggs announced that Winston would not be charged, saying he couldn't prove beyond a reasonable doubt the woman's allegations.

It is unclear if woman will pursue a civil case against Winston or the university. She can still sue after the investigation. Buzuvis said her case could be stronger depending on the Department of Education's findings.

Braun booed in first road game since suspension

BOSTON (AP) From the boos to the bad at-bats, Ryan Braun's first road game since his 65-game suspension was a rough afternoon.

He went 0 for 5 against the Red Sox on Friday. But he was 5 for 5 in getting hooted by Fenway Park's passionate fans.

"All I can do is focus on things I can control," Braun said after the Milwaukee Brewers spoiled Boston's home opener with a 6-2 win. "I certainly wasn't anticipating a reception like I got in Milwaukee."

In the season opener at home on Monday, fans applauded loudly as he walked to the plate against the Atlanta Braves. In Boston, the boos started even before the game as the 2011 NL MVP heard them when the starting lineup was announced and Milwaukee players lined up along the third-base line.

The Brewers slugger has apologized several times this offseason after accepting his suspension on July 22 following Major League Baseball's investigation of the Biogenesis of America anti-aging clinic. The penalty was given for violations of MLB's drug agreement and labor contract.

Braun was the designated hitter and hit in his customary No. 3 position against the Red Sox. He struck out, popped to second base, flied to right, grounded to shortstop and flied to right.

A victory "always makes it so much better," Braun said of his struggles. "I'm at a point in my career where I've had a lot of individual success, and the game is so much more fun when the team's winning."

Braun has been dealing with a nerve problem in the area of his right thumb.

"It's kind of ebb and flow, up and down," he said. "I hope we find something that eventually makes a difference."

That's just one more issue for Braun to deal with as he comes back from his suspension. But he's trying to ignore the boos from opposing fans.

"I've dealt with it for the last couple of years," he said, "so I've had plenty of experience dealing with it and I think regardless of how challenging anything is, the more you deal with it, the easier it becomes to deal with. I dealt with it in 2012, had my best year. Last year I was off to a good start before my early departure."

He knows there's not much he can do to stop fans from expressing themselves.

"I don't know if I was yelling at people if that would make any type of difference, and that's not who I am," Braun said. "There's no blueprint for any of this stuff. It's not easy. It's not fun, but I just deal with it the best I can."

Wolves' Cunningham accused of choking girlfriend

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) Minnesota Timberwolves forward Dante Cunningham was charged Friday with assault after being accused of choking his girlfriend during an argument.

A criminal complaint filed in Hennepin County District Court said his girlfriend told police they got into the argument early Thursday at his suburban Minneapolis home. The woman, who is not named in the complaint, told police he kicked down a locked bedroom door, grabbed her around the neck and slammed her against the wall, choking her for 15 to 20 seconds during which she could not breathe.

"Victim's eyes were watering and she felt like she was being strangled to death," the complaint alleges.

The woman told police he then dropped her, and she called 911.

According to the complaint, their relationship began last summer and they had been living together for eight months. Police said Thursday that she did not require medical treatment.

Cunningham was charged with one felony count of domestic assault by strangulation. The 26-year-old remained jailed Friday evening with bail set at $40,000. It wasn't clear if he had an attorney.

He was unable to join the Timberwolves when they left Thursday on a two-game road trip to Florida.

The team issued a statement Thursday saying they were gathering more information.

"The Minnesota Timberwolves organization takes the matter very seriously and does not condone the type of behavior that is associated with this situation," the statement read. "However, we need to let the legal process run its course, and will have further comment at the appropriate time."

Donovan, Calipari in bonus duel at Final Four

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) Florida's Billy Donovan has both the SEC trophies from this season. Kentucky's John Calipari has the bigger bonus check, at least for now.

If the Gators get past Connecticut in Saturday's semifinals and win their third national championship under Donovan on Monday night, the coach will have the biggest postseason payoff among his Final Four counterparts.

If Calipari makes it two titles in the past three seasons with the Wildcats, he will take home $700,000 through incentives that are common for college coaches but more lucrative at some schools.

Kentucky is clearly on the higher end in basketball. Calipari can make as much as $800,000 each year off the success of his team - he's leaving at least $100,000 on the table this year because Florida won the SEC regular-season and tournament championships.

But even the $700,000 he could get this year is more than the combined maximum for the other three coaches with a shot at the title.

Donovan would make $400,000 with a championship, followed by Connecticut's Kevin Ollie at $166,666 and Wisconsin's Bo Ryan at $120,000.

"A program's got to reach a stage of saying, `Whatever decision we make, we're making it within our means,"' said Oklahoma athletic director Joe Castiglione, who has one of the nation's highest-paid football coaches in Bob Stoops. "I know people focus on some of these salaries and I understand that, but there's a lot more investment being made into areas that directly, hopefully positively, impact the experience for student-athletes."

Winning helps that experience as much as anything, and coaches usually have quite a bit extra spending money when they make long postseason runs.

Donovan, who recently signed a three-year extension that raised his average salary to $3.7 million annually over the final six years of the contract, has made an extra $250,000 so far this season. The 18th-year Florida coach would get another $150,000 by winning the title.

Calipari already has $350,000 coming his way - $100,000 each for reaching the Sweet 16 and the regional finals and another $150,000 for making the Final Four. A championship would mean another $350,000 for a coach who has a guaranteed income of $4.8 million this season.

"It seems like we're working to keep coaches and if there's a lack of success people are questioning about keeping coaches," Castiglione said. "So you're always balancing one or the other. When programs see success happening at others, they want to emulate it. Sometimes that means they're coming after your best personnel."

Connecticut athletic director Warde Manual is already on record as saying he wants to rework Ollie's contract after the Huskies made a surprising run to the Final Four.

Ollie and Ryan have bonus structures more closely tied to school formulas.

At UConn, Ollie and women's coach Geno Auriemma get $33,333 at three benchmarks - making the tournament, getting to the Sweet 16 and advancing to the Final Four. The payoff doubles for a championship.

Ollie is making $1.2 million this year, about $700,000 less than Auriemma in a rare instance of the coach of a women's team making more than the men's coach at the same school.

Ryan, whose is making about $2.3 million this season, has already earned $60,000 for reaching the Final Four. That bonus jumps to $100,000 with a trip to the title game and $120,000 if the Badgers win the school's second national title.

Saints agree to terms with Champ Bailey

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Champ Bailey will get to chase a Pro Bowl record and another Super Bowl appearance with the New Orleans Saints.

The veteran cornerback agreed to a two-year contract with the Saints on Friday, with a maximum value that approaches $7 million, including guaranteed money and a signing bonus in the first year.

The 35-year-old Bailey played the last 10 seasons with Denver after spending his first five in the NFL with Washington. A shutdown cornerback for much of his career, Bailey has made three All-Pro teams and been selected to 12 Pro Bowls. He trails only Hall of Fame end Reggie White (13) among defensive players in NFL history in Pro Bowls.

Bailey's 52 interceptions are the most among active players, as are his 204 passes defensed. He made the league's All-Decade team for 2000-09.

"We are excited to be able to add a future Hall of Fame player with the addition of Champ Bailey," Saints general manager Mickey Loomis said. "His career accomplishments mirror that of his high character, and he's a very prideful and competitive player who we believe will add to our defense."

Bailey missed 11 games because of a left foot sprain originally suffered in the 2013 preseason, which wound up being a Lisfranc injury, one of the most painful for an athlete.

He returned late in the season to help the Broncos advance to the Super Bowl, where they were routed by Seattle.

His coverage skills clearly are not what they were in his prime, but he will add leadership and savvy to the Saints' secondary that is undergoing a transformation following the release of strong safety Roman Harper and the loss of free safety Malcolm Jenkins, who signed with Philadelphia as a free agent.

"I have a little more to my game, I believe, especially mentally," Bailey said on the Saints' official website. "I can see things a lot easier, a lot of things come up that I've had experience with. That only helps your game. I'm using that to my advantage as much as possible because I know how much you've got to be mentally ready for this, as well as physically ready.

"I just like the situation I'm going into because I know these guys are going to be hungry."

New Orleans also may lose safety Rafael Bush, an unrestricted free agent who on Thursday signed an offer sheet from the Atlanta Falcons. New Orleans has until April 8 to match that offer and keep Bush, but the Saints have been operating with minimal salary cap space, which will only be squeezed further by bringing in Bailey.

A versatile player who saw action on offense, defense and special teams at Georgia, Bailey was drafted with the seventh overall pick in 1999 by Washington. He was dealt to Denver in 2004 for running back Clinton Portis.

Wake Forest hires Danny Manning from Tulsa

Danny Manning grew up watching Wake Forest play games at the Greensboro Coliseum, memories that linger in his mind all these years later.

He never thought one day he'd coach the Demon Deacons.

Manning, the former Kansas star who spent the past two seasons coaching Tulsa, was hired Friday as Wake Forest's basketball coach. He'll be introduced at a news conference next week on campus in Winston-Salem, N.C., a short drive from where Manning grew up.

"I spent a lot of my formative childhood years in North Carolina," Manning told The Associated Press on Friday at AT&T Stadium, the site of this weekend's Final Four.

"I spent the majority of my life in Kansas," Manning said, "but this was a chance to be a part of a university that I share the same values and history with."

His hiring ends Wake Forest's two-week search for a replacement for Jeff Bzdelik, who resigned under intense public pressure following four mostly unremarkable seasons.

Manning, who was 38-29 with two postseason berths in two seasons at Tulsa, interviewed this week and toured the campus in Winston-Salem on Wednesday before taking the job two days later.

His hiring is considered somewhat risky because of his lack of head coaching experience, but there's no question he brings instant name recognition to a program that dropped to near the bottom of the expanded Atlantic Coast Conference.

"There have been very few players who have had as much success on the court as Danny," Wake Forest athletic director Ron Wellman said in a statement. "He has played for and worked under a number of legendary coaches and he has been successful in his coaching career. We fully expect that Danny's coaching career will reflect the excellence of his playing career."

Manning attended Greensboro Page High School before his family moved to Lawrence, Kan., for his senior year, and when it was time to choose a college, he picked Kansas over North Carolina.

After his "Danny and the Miracles" team won the national title in Kansas City, not far from the Jayhawks' campus, Manning was drafted first overall by the Los Angeles Clippers in 1988.

He made two All-Star teams during a career marred by injuries before joining coach Bill Self's staff at Kansas in 2003. Responsible primarily for working with post players, Manning was promoted to assistant coach in 2006 and two years ago earned his first head coaching job at Tulsa.

Self called Manning "one of the most accomplished, humble people you'll ever meet."

The 47-year-old Manning took the Golden Hurricane to the CBI in his first year and followed that by guiding them to the Conference USA tournament title and their first NCAA tournament berth since 2003. They earned a No. 13 seed and lost to UCLA in their tournament opener.

Tulsa forward Rashad Smith said he found out about Manning's move through teammates and media reports, though he said the coach texted him shortly thereafter.

Guard James Woodard said it was "kind of shocking.

"You know in the back of your mind, the run we had this year, there would be a lot of opportunities out there," Woodard said. "I'm happy for him."

Wake Forest never came close to making the NCAA tournament under Bzdelik, who stepped down March 20. Bzdelik went 51-76 with a 17-51 record in ACC play, and won only two league road games.

Eight players transferred out during his tenure, and the Demon Deacons have been one of the youngest programs in the country - with only one fourth-year senior in each of the past two years.

Barring any more transfers, Manning will inherit a team with eight players who are either juniors or redshirt juniors - including promising big man Devin Thomas and tempo-setting guard Codi Miller-McIntyre.

As details of Manning's hiring trickled across Twitter, Miller-McIntyre tweeted: "Finally it's over! Time to get back to work."

Manning called the Demon Deacons a "sleeping giant," one that he believes will be able to contend with Tobacco Road rivals Duke and North Carolina in the near future.

"A few years back, they were ranked No. 1 in the country," Manning told AP. "They've had great players. You're about Chris Paul, Tim Duncan, just to name a few, because they've had quite a few.

"I'm looking forward to going there and being part of that great tradition."

Seahawks lock up coach Pete Carroll with extension

SEATTLE (AP) The first major contract extension finalized by the Seattle Seahawks following their Super Bowl title was a commitment to coach Pete Carroll - and to an ideology that finally proved successful at the professional level.

While getting stars such as Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman locked up remains important, the focus for the Seahawks was making sure Carroll was sticking around.

"This was a huge priority for us coming into the offseason," Seattle general manager John Schneider said Friday. "We knew it was around the corner and it was, quite honestly, we're trying to take care of our own people and keep our young players together. But where do you start? You start at the top."

The Seahawks locked up Carroll through the 2016 season with a three-year extension announced Friday. The new contract rips up the final year of the original five-year deal Carroll signed in January 2010, and cleared up any uncertainty whether the 62-year-old coach wanted to stick around after his original deal expired.

Carroll is staying. So are the ideas and beliefs he brought with him when he arrived from Southern California. Back then, there was skepticism whether his style and attitude would work in the NFL.

Now, there's no question.

"Whether this came about or not I was going to keep busting it and going for it. It wasn't going to matter in that regard. But I think the statement, that they wanted to validate the commitment to what we're doing and how we're doing it, was extraordinary," Carroll said. "It was an extraordinary effort on their part and I'm just humbled and thrilled they see it that way."

Carroll is 38-26 in four regular seasons with Seattle and 5-2 in the playoffs. He's the second-oldest head coach in the NFL - yet rarely acts his age - and one of seven current coaches with a Super Bowl title. The championship was a crowning achievement for Carroll after struggles in his two previous stints as an NFL head coach with the New York Jets and New England.

Carroll was lured to Seattle because of something he didn't have in his previous NFL stops: control. Seattle gave him the reins to the franchise, and hired him before adding Schneider to the mix, and creating a relationship that has been marked by stability and success.

After nearly a decade of winning with the Trojans and having say over a program, that level of control was crucial if he was going back to the professional ranks. The Seahawks were willing.

"I loved my time at USC and I was having the time of my life being part of that wonderful school and all the things that we were doing," Carroll said. "But I knew there was another challenge out there and that was coming to the league."

The challenge Carroll inherited included tearing down and rebuilding the Seahawks roster and treading water through a pair of 7-9 seasons his first two years. The breakthrough came in Year 3 when Seattle drafted Russell Wilson, who gave them stability at quarterback. Seattle went 11-5 in Carroll's third season and reached the divisional round of the playoffs.

Carroll followed that by guiding the Seahawks to 13 regular-season wins, the 2013 NFC West title and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Seattle knocked off New Orleans in the divisional round then edged San Francisco in the NFC title game before routing Denver 43-8 in the Super Bowl in February.

Part of the allure for Carroll now is Seattle's potential. The Seahawks are still young and have the likes of Wilson, Sherman, Thomas, Kam Chancellor, Percy Harvin and Michael Bennett, among others, returning from the title team.

"Fortunately we've had a pretty good little run and we're in the middle of something pretty special," Carroll said. "There's no reason that either one of us think, 'OK, we did this one time and that was it and that was our shot.' We think we're right in the middle of a great opportunity here."

Busy mind of Tom Watson, Ryder Cup captain

KANSAS CITY –- So you will ask: What is Tom Watson thinking about as captain of the Ryder Cup team? Tiger’s injury? The emergence of young players like Jordan Spieth and Billy Horschel and others? The United States’ inability to win on European soil since the last time Watson was captain in 1993?

Not really, no.

Clothing. These days, he’s thinking a lot about clothing.

“You’re doing all the stylings and patterns and material and all that,” he says. “And then you have to get it fitted right, make sure everyone is comfortable in it. We’ll have a fitting for as many as 25 players and their caddies at the Memorial. ... We’ll say to them, ‘You have a chance on making the Ryder Cup team, come in and get fitted.' That’s part of the process to get them comfortable in their stuff.”

Well, how the clothes fit might seem like a pretty insignificant detail to many of us, but this is Tom Watson, eight-time major champion, a man who almost won the British Open just months before his 60th birthday. Details are not insignificant. Preparation is not insignificant. He says Jack Nicklaus was better than anyone in golf history at preparing for an event. And that –- not his great talent –- was what made him Jack Nicklaus.

Watson is 64 now -- he just shot his age for the first time -- and he’s a grandfather, and he admits that for the first time last year he saw a significant drop in distance of his drives. He admits that he doesn’t dissect and analyze a golf course the way he once did. He says his game isn’t bad (he just hit one of the most astonishing recovery shots you will ever see) but he says he just isn’t as driven as he used to be.

But anyone who knows Watson does not underestimate the competitive spirit he brings to this job as Ryder Cup captain. That competitive spirit has been the driving force of his golfing life. He came on the Tour as a relative unknown and promised himself only that he would work harder than anyone else. He did that and within a few years was the best golfer in the world.

Though he will downplay his role on the team -– see below -- he has already looked into the inspirational tactics of people like Kansas basketball coach Bill Self. He is slowly getting to know the players -– he is going to play five Tour events this year (Masters, Heritage, Greenbrier, British Open and PGA) and says he will get to know them better.

And as for Tiger Woods –- he says he just hopes Woods recovers from his back surgery and can play the game freely again.

“I’ve been asked a little bit about, ‘What if he doesn’t make the team?’ ” Watson says. “I’ll pick him for the team. I just hope he gets well and starts to play again without pain. That’s all that matters.

“Everybody’s been in pain before, every golfer. For some, it’s ended their careers. For others, they’ve beat it and corrected with surgery. Obviously I hope this is corrected with surgery. Obviously, I hope that he can recover and again swing the club without any pain."

Watson has been critical of Woods in years past -– particularly his behavior on the golf course -– but he says, “We all change.”

Woods was the U.S. Junior Amateur champion the last time that Watson coached the Ryder Cup team ... that was at The Belfry in England, 1993, and the United States needed a last-day comeback that was capped when Davis Love III beat Costantino Rocca on the final hole. Watson has always said that victory is one of the proudest moments of a golf career that included perhaps the most famous shot in golf history (his chip-in at the 1982 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach) and what is almost certainly the most famous duel in golf history (his “Duel in the Sun” matchup with Jack Nicklaus at the 1977 British Open at Turnberry). Bringing the Ryder Cup back to the United States after five losses in the last six matches is very much on his mind.

But when I asked him if he has already started his coaching, he dismissed the question.

“I don’t have to coach,” he said.

“Really? You won’t coach a little bit?”

“No, I don’t have to coach,” he said.

I smiled. I’ve known Tom Watson for more than 20 years. This is a man who once glared at me when I told him that the RBI (Reviving Baseball in the Inner City) team I was sponsoring would beat the one he was sponsoring. He snapped: “We’ll kick your (bleep).” This is the man who started a local tournament in his hometown for local pros called the “Watson Classic” and then pronounced he had no intention of losing it. This is the man who stared down Trevino and Player and Ray Floyd and Seve Ballesteros and, mostly, Jack Nicklaus.

I said, “Wait, so you’re saying that you won’t set a tone? You won’t try to create team chemistry? You’re saying that’s not true at all?”

He kind of looked up sheepishly. “Well, it’s true ... to a certain degree. But that won’t happen until later.”

A's beat Mariners on Crisp's homer in 12th

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) Coco Crisp homered leading off the bottom of the 12th inning to lift the Oakland Athletics to a 3-2 win over the Seattle Mariners on Thursday night.

Crisp, who scored the tying run with two outs in the eighth inning, hit a towering home run off Seattle reliever Hector Noesi (0-1) on an 0-1 pitch. The ball landed just above the out-of-town scoreboard in right field. It's the sixth game-ending hit of Crisp's career.

Yoenis Cespedes and Sam Fuld also drove in runs for Oakland, which rallied from two runs down for its first walkoff win of the season.

Drew Pomeranz (1-0), the fifth A's pitcher, worked one scoreless inning for the win.

Abraham Almonte had two hits and an RBI for Seattle.

Mavericks beat Clippers 113-107 behind Nowitzki

LOS ANGELES (AP) Dirk Nowitzki scored 26 points, Jose Calderon added 19 and the Dallas Mavericks beat the Los Angeles Clippers for the first time this season, 113-107 on Thursday night.

Blake Griffin had 25 points, 10 rebounds and 11 assists in his first triple-double of the season for the Clippers, who had won 17 of their previous 19, including four straight. They beat the Mavs in their first three meetings of the season, coming from behind each time.

A night earlier, the Clippers came back from a 17-point deficit to beat Phoenix on the road, clinching their second straight Pacific Division title and third consecutive playoff berth.

They nearly pulled it off again.

Trailing by 12 points, Los Angeles scored 10 in a row, including six by Darren Collison, to trail 109-107 with 1:26 left. The Mavericks missed four straight shots and had a turnover before Griffin fouled Nowitzki near mid-court.

Nowitzki made both for a 111-107 lead with 17 seconds left. Collison fouled Shawn Marion and he made both to keep the Clippers down by six.

Samuel Dalembert and Monta Ellis added 12 points each, and Vince Carter had 16 for the Mavs, who won their third straight on a road while battling Memphis for the eighth and last Western Conference playoff spot.

Dallas had the Clippers trailing for much of their last matchup of the season against each other. Los Angeles rallied to tie it 89-all early in the fourth on two free throws by J.J. Redick, who finished with 12 points in his first game since Feb. 3. He missed 25 games with a bulging disk in his back.

Nowitzki led a 10-0 run, sandwiching 3-pointers around a basket by Carter, to put Dallas back in front 99-89.

A 3-pointer by Carter extended the Mavs' lead to 104-93. Dallas clamped down on Chris Paul and Griffin for a stretch before the Clippers got hot. Paul finished with 17 points and nine assists.

DeAndre Jordan added 21 points and 15 rebounds, and Collison had 22 points for the Clippers.

The Clippers rallied to start the third, using a 13-7 run to take a 69-65 lead. Jordan scored six points and four others scored. But their lead was short-lived.

Dallas outscored the Clippers 21-12 to end the third leading 86-81. Calderon scored 10 in a row, Dalembert and Ellis had four each, and Carter and Devin Harris hit 3-pointers to keep the Clippers from regaining the lead.

The Mavericks led by 11 twice in the first half, and were up 58-56 at halftime.

NOTES: Clippers backup G Jamal Crawford missed his third straight game with a sore left Achilles' tendon. F Danny Granger sat out with a strained left hamstring. Coach Doc Rivers said he'd be surprised if either of them return before the playoffs begin in two weeks. ... The Mavs avoided getting swept by the Clippers for the first time since 1993-94. ... It was Griffin's fourth triple-double of his career.

Report: Seahawks reach extension with Carroll

RENTON, Wash. (AP) The Seattle Seahawks have called a news conference for Friday morning amid a report they have reached a contract extension with coach Pete Carroll.

NFL Network reported Thursday night, citing a "source," that Carroll and the Seahawks had reached agreement on a contract extension. Carroll's original five-year deal with Seattle was set to expire after the 2014 season.

The Seahawks announcement did not specify the nature of the news conference and team officials would not confirm the report of an extension for Carroll.

Carroll reached the top of the NFL last season, leading the Seahawks to their first Super Bowl title. Lured away from USC in 2010 with the chance at complete control over the football operations, Carroll tore down then rebuilt the Seahawks roster into one of the best in the NFL. He's 38-26 in four regular seasons with Seattle and 5-2 in the playoffs.

Carroll has made competition the benchmark of his time in Seattle. It's why quarterback Russell Wilson and cornerback Richard Sherman have become stars - because they were given opportunities in Carroll's system.

Carroll, 62, is the second oldest coach in the NFL, but rarely appears his age. He came to Seattle because of the chance he didn't have in his two previous stops as an NFL head coach: control. Seattle gave him the reins to the franchise, and hired him before adding general manager John Schneider to the mix, a relationship that has been marked by stability and success.

Carroll lacked control in his previous positions with New England and the New York Jets. But after a decade of winning with the Trojans and having that control, it was something Carroll demanded if he was going to get back into the professional ranks and the Seahawks were willing.

Seattle also let Carroll imprint his attitude on the locker room. He wanted a fun atmosphere filled with accountability. Competition was at the crux of everything Carroll did from the day he inherited a 5-11 team. Carroll took Seattle to the playoffs in his first season despite a 7-9 regular season record.

The Seahawks plateaued in 2011 going 7-9 again but took a jump in 2012 after drafting Wilson. The Seahawks went 11-5 in the regular season and reached the divisional round of the playoffs. The roster turnover had been completed and there were massive expectations going into 2013.

Seattle matched and surpassed those expectations. Carroll guided Seattle to 13 wins in the regular season, the NFC West title and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Seattle knocked off New Orleans in the divisional round, then edged San Francisco in the NFC title game to reach its second Super Bowl.

At the Super Bowl, Carroll got to celebrate the way he did watching USC's run of dominance in the mid-2000s. Seattle's defense stifled the highest scoring offense in NFL history, humbling Denver in a 43-8 beating to give Seattle its first title. After the season Carroll sounded as if he was locked in to a long future with the Seahawks.

"We're trying to do something really good for a really long time and we want to see how far we can go and someday, we look back and see what we accomplished," Carroll said.

Pitino leads Minnesota past SMU 65-63 to win NIT

NEW YORK (AP) Richard Pitino held his 3-year-old daughter in his arms as his Minnesota team cut down the net at Madison Square Garden.

"Richard, get up there!" yelled his famous father, Rick, the Hall of Fame coach at Louisville.

First, the kid had others in mind.

"The assistants!" he shouted back.

Spoken like a coach who listened closely at the dinner table eating up every last lesson.

Austin Hollins hit a tiebreaking 3-pointer with 46.1 seconds left and Minnesota won the NIT championship Thursday night, beating SMU 65-63 to give the Pitino family its latest postseason tournament title.

Hollins scored 19 points and Andre Hollins had 14 for the Golden Gophers (25-13), who took home the trophy for the third time. They also won the National Invitation Tournament in 1993 and `98, though the second one was vacated because of an NCAA rules violation involving player eligibility.

"We made some big-time plays," Richard Pitino said. "Austin made a big-time 3. We gutted it out. That is a very good team. They're a really good team. They deserve to be in the NCAA tournament. I'm really proud of our guys. I'm so happy for our seniors."

With Rick Pitino sitting - sometimes standing - right near his son's bench, Minnesota made up for a blowout loss to Stanford in the NIT final two years ago and finished with a flourish in its first season under 31-year-old Richard Pitino.

"I think it's one of the highlights of my life," Rick Pitino said on the court after giving his boy a hug. "He's a brilliant young man."

After dad was knocked out of the NCAAs last week when the defending champion Cardinals were beaten by rival Kentucky in the Sweet 16, it was left to the younger Pitino to bring home a title in April.

That's exactly what he did, defeating SMU and Hall of Fame coach Larry Brown - old enough to be his grandfather.

"It was a character win," Richard Pitino said, his boyish face still looking focused on the postgame tasks at hand.

Nic Moore had 17 points and Nick Russell added 15 for the Mustangs (27-10), who led by seven with 5:52 left after a 9-1 spurt.

Pitino called a timeout and his players quickly responded. DeAndre Mathieu had a three-point play, a steal and an assist to key a 7-0 run that tied the score just more than a minute later.

"Got to give a lot of credit to Richard and his team," Brown said. "They were really well prepared. Got down seven and I thought he got their kids to dig in a little bit. We didn't handle prosperity very well. Had some terrible turnovers in the guts of the game, and I think it turned the game around."

Andre Hollins hit three of four free throws in the final 16.3 seconds to help keep Minnesota in front. Mathieu scored all 13 of his points in the second half and finished with seven assists for the Gophers.

Austin Hollins shot 8 for 12, including 3 of 6 from behind the arc, and was selected the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

"Ah, man it feels great," he said. "It's a blessing to be able to finish the season on a win. Few teams get to do that."

The 73-year-old Brown has turned things around in two seasons at SMU, and his latest reclamation project was the favorite going into the NIT after being one of the last teams snubbed by the NCAA tournament.

Minnesota also shrugged off the disappointment of being left out of the 68-team field. Both schools received a No. 1 seed in the NIT and made the most of it, winning three home games apiece to advance to New York.

The championship game matched two coaches with boyhood roots in the Big Apple. Just like Brown, Pitino's father once coached the Knicks, leading them to a division title and two playoff appearances from 1987-89.

Brown flopped with the hometown team, going 23-59 as Knicks coach during the 2005-06 season. But that didn't seem to bother the New York crowd, which gave him a warm hand before the opening tip Thursday.

Brown is in his 39th season as a head coach, nine in college. He won an NCAA crown at Kansas in 1988 and an NBA title with the Detroit Pistons in 2004. He has guided a record eight NBA franchises to the playoffs.

Looking to tie the school record for wins set during the 1987-88 season, SMU was playing in only its third NIT and first national tournament final.

"I'm proud of my team," Brown said. "We picked ourselves up and we competed at the highest level against quality teams and gave ourselves a chance to win."

Solarte's 3 hits lead Yankees over Astros, 4-2

HOUSTON (AP) Rookie Yangervis Solarte had three hits and an RBI in his first major league start and Derek Jeter drove in a run to give the New York Yankees their first win this season, 4-2 over the Houston Astros on Thursday night.

Solarte singled in a two-run third inning which put New York up 2-1. He doubled in the fifth and scored on a single by Jeter to push it to 3-1.

Houston cut the lead to one in the bottom of that inning before Solarte came through again, this time with a single that drove in Ichiro Suzuki.

Solarte, the third baseman, also had a nifty defensive play when he grabbed a bullet hit right at him by Jose Altuve for the third out in the eighth.

Ivan Nova allowed six hits, two runs and walked five in 5 2-3 innings. He was helped by a defense which turned four double plays with him on the mound. David Robertson, who took over as closer for Mariano Rivera, pitched a perfect ninth for his first save.

Houston, the league's worst team the past three seasons, came back to earth after taking the first two games of the series. But Dexter Fowler continued to shine in his first season with the Astros, getting two singles to become the second player in franchise history - and first since Ken Caminiti in 1987 - to begin his Houston career with three straight multi-hit games.

Houston starter Brett Oberholtzer also went 5 2-3 innings, allowing five hits and three runs while fanning five.

Suzuki doubled with two outs in the seventh before scoring on the RBI by Solarte. Solarte's hit was a high pop-up which dropped right between three Astros players assembled directly in front of home plate.

Solarte doubled with one out in the fifth and scored on a two-out single by Jeter to make it 3-1. Jeter was thrown out trying to stretch the hit into a double.

Houston got within 3-2 when Jonathan Villar doubled and scored on a single by Fowler in the bottom of the inning. The fourth double play by the Yankees got the first two outs before Chris Carter grounded out to end the inning.

Oberholtzer retired the first seven batters he faced before running into trouble. Suzuki and Solarte hit consecutive singles before a third one by Brett Gardner scored Suzuki to tie it at 1-all.

Jeter walked and Carlos Beltran's sacrifice fly scored Solarte to give New York a 2-1 lead.

Fowler and Grossman hit back-to-back singles to start the first before Nova plunked Castro to load the bases. Altuve grounded into a forceout that left Castro out at second and scored Fowler to make it 1-0.

Carter walked to load the bases again, but the Yankees turned a double play to limit the damage. The Yankees also used double plays to get out of the third and fourth innings.

Castro was also hit by a pitch in the third inning to become the first Astro since Brad Ausmus on April 7, 2007, to be hit twice in a game. He remained in the game before being replaced by Carlos Corporan in the top of the sixth with a bruise on his right foot. X-rays were negative and he is day to day.

NOTES: A replay was initiated by umpires on the field to check the count on an at-bat by Solarte with two outs in the ninth and it was confirmed it was a 3-1 count. ... Japanese ace Masahiro Tanaka is scheduled to make his major league debut against right-hander Dustin McGowan when the Yankees open a three-game series at Toronto on Friday. ... Houston right-hander Lucas Harrell opposes left-hander Tyler Skaggs when the Astros begin a series with the Los Angeles Angels. ... The Astros observed a moment of silence before the game to remember the victims on Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood, which left three dead and 16 wounded.

Florida State under investigation by feds

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) Florida State University is under investigation by the U.S. Department of Education for possible Title IX violations in its response to sexual violence complaints.

USA Today first reported the investigation by the Office for Civil Rights. It stems from a complaint filed with it by the accuser in quarterback Jameis Winston's sexual assault case.

No charges were filed by State Attorney Willie Meggs against the Heisman trophy winner.

"Our client is particularly gratified by the OCR's decision to investigate and look for discrimination and find remedies to it," the accuser's lawyer Baine Kerr said, "because her primary goal, from the beginning, has been affecting change that will make women at Florida State safer on campus."

Winston was accused of sexual assault from an incident in Dec. 2012. Police decided not to press charges in Dec. 2013. The OCR will investigate all sexual assault complaints at the university during the last three years.

The accuser received a letter from the university in February stating that it met with Winston on Jan. 23 to investigate possible Code of Conduct violations. Winston led the Seminoles to the national championship on Jan. 6.

"We can confirm that we have been notified of the OCR investigation; however, due to federal and state privacy laws the university cannot comment," university spokesman Browning Brooks said in a statement.

The OCR tells schools that "Conduct may constitute unlawful sexual harassment under Title IX even if the police do not have sufficient evidence of a criminal violation. In addition, a criminal investigation into allegations of sexual violence does not relieve the school of its duty under Title IX to resolve complaints promptly and equitably."

It is unclear if the accuser will pursue a civil case against Winston or the university. Her family accused the Tallahassee Police Department of delaying the investigation and discouraging her from going forward with the case because of the public attention it would receive. Tallahassee police have defended their handling of the case.

A civil case can still be filed after the OCR investigation.

The woman told police she had been drinking at a bar with friends and went home with a man she didn't know. She said the alleged assault took place at an off-campus apartment, but she couldn't remember where it was.

A month later, she identified her alleged attacker as the quarterback. Winston's attorney Tim Jansen said the sex was consensual.

Kerr confirmed a Deadspin.com report that football players Chris Casher and Ronald Darby were recently charged with violations of the school's Code of Conduct. Both Casher and Darby told police they witnessed the sex between the Winston and the accuser. Casher told police that he attempted to join, but was told to leave by the accuser.

Punishments under the code include expulsion from the school. Darby is a starting cornerback on the team.

Durant, Thunder end Spurs' 19-game win streak

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Kevin Durant scored 28 points to help the Oklahoma City Thunder defeat San Antonio 106-94 on Thursday night, ending the Spurs' winning streak at 19 games.

Russell Westbrook scored 27 points and Serge Ibaka added 11 points and 12 rebounds for the Thunder, who won the matchup between the top two teams in the Western Conference. Oklahoma City is three games behind with eight games remaining.

Durant scored at least 25 points for the 39th consecutive game, the longest streak since Michael Jordan did it 40 consecutive times during the 1986-87 season. He reached 25 on a free throw with 3:31 remaining.

Patty Mills scored 21 points and Kawhi Leonard and Tim Duncan each added 17 for the Spurs. San Antonio had won its previous four games by an average of 23.5 points.

Spurs reserve Manu Ginobili didn't play. He was not listed on the injury report, and coach Gregg Popovich did not explain why Ginobili was out.

Oklahoma City trailed 51-43 in the second quarter before Westbrook drained a 3-pointer, then made a layup with 2.6 seconds left in the first half to cut the deficit to 51-48 at halftime.

The Thunder continued their surge in the second half. Rookie Andre Roberson hit a 3-pointer gave the Thunder a 57-56 lead. A lob from Reggie Jackson to Durant for a dunk gave Oklahoma City a 75-65 lead. Durant hit a running jumper in the closing seconds of the third quarter to put the Thunder up 80-71. He scored 12 points on 6-for-9 shooting in the period.

Oklahoma City pushed its lead to 16, but San Antonio went on an 8-0 run to pull to 91-83.

The Thunder regained control. Westbrook got into the open court, clutched and threw down a reverse dunk to bump Oklahoma City's lead back up to 95-83 with 5:25 to play.

NOTES: Jackson played after sitting the previous two games with a mid-back sprain. ... Thunder C Kendrick Perkins returned to action after missing the previous 17 games with a left groin strain he suffered against the Miami Heat. ... Duncan and Perkins got tangled up early in the third quarter, and both were issued technical fouls. Perkins had his arm around Duncan, Duncan threw it off, and Perkins shoved Duncan. ... Thunder reserve F Nick Collison left the game in the third quarter after he took an elbow to the head from San Antonio reserve F Jeff Ayres and was bleeding. He got four staples and was ready to play early in the fourth quarter. ... Westbrook was issued a technical with 1:07 remaining after arguing with the officials.

Ricketts considering selling share of Chicago Cubs

CHICAGO (AP) The owners of the Chicago Cubs could sell minority shares in the team to help finance renovations at century-old Wrigley Field.

Cubs spokesman Julian Green confirmed published reports Thursday that the Ricketts family is considering selling non-controlling shares to pay for a proposed $500 million upgrade of Wrigley and redevelopment of the surrounding area. The Ricketts own 95 percent of the Cubs, with the Tribune Co., which sold the team to the family, owning the rest.

Forbes, in its recent valuation of major league teams, ranked the Cubs as the fourth-most valuable at $1.2 billion. The Ricketts reportedly bought the team for $845 million

Progress on renovating the ballpark has been stymied by opposition by surrounding rooftop owners. They believe changes to Wrigley may block views of the field.

Mets' Murphy, Collins defend paternity leave

NEW YORK (AP) Daniel Murphy is proud he put fatherhood ahead of baseball, and New York Mets manager Terry Collins thinks criticism his second baseman received for taking paternity leave this week was unfair.

Murphy made his season debut in Thursday's 8-2 loss to Washington, three days after the birth of son Noah. He called staying in Florida an extra day "the right decision to make" following wife Victoria's cesarean section and said "we felt the best thing for our family was for me to stay."

He learned Sunday that his wife's water broke, then traveled to Florida and missed Monday's 9-7 opening loss to Washington and Wednesday night's 5-1 defeat. He said his son was born at 12:02 p.m. Monday.

Major league rules allow up to three days of paternity leave, and WFAN broadcaster Mike Francesa said on the air Wednesday that Murphy should not have skipped the second game.

"One day I understand. And in the old days they didn't do that," Francesa said. "But one day, go see the baby be born and come back. You're a Major League Baseball player. You can hire a nurse to take care of the baby if your wife needs help."

Former NFL quarterback Boomer Esiason also was critical during his show on WFAN.

"Quite frankly, I would have said C-section before the season starts. I need to be at opening day, I'm sorry," he said. "This is what makes our money. This is how we're going to live our life. This is going to give my child every opportunity to be a success in life. I'll be able to afford any college I want to send my kid to because I'm a baseball player."

A day later, Collins bristled after learning of the comments.

"If you're accusing Dan Murphy of not wanting to play - this guy played 161 games last year, wore himself out, played through all sorts of discomfort," he said. "You know, the man had his first child. He's allowed to be there. The rules state that he can be there, so he went. There's nothing against it. There's nothing wrong with it. You know, he missed two games. It's not like he's missed 10. You know, when you start attacking Dan Murphy's credibility, you need to look in the mirror a little bit."

Murphy said he received text messages about the criticism. He was applauded before his first at-bat, singled and scored the Mets' first run against the Nationals. Murphy went 1 for 3 but also made a throwing error and a fielding error.

"Pretty good at the plate, not so much in the field," he said. "A little sluggish on defense. It was frustrating."

Minnesota Twins left-hander Brian Duensing also returned Thursday after three days on the paternity leave list, and Tampa Bay put outfielder Sean Rodriguez on the list.

"Little did I know I was going to start a national dialogue," Francesa said on the air Thursday. "I never attacked Daniel Murphy," he added, saying his distinction applied if "you have the wherewithal to maybe afford care that some people may not."

"I think two days is plenty, and get back to work," he said.

Murphy said he was happy to hear about people who backed his choice to spend time with his wife and won.

"I appreciate it, anyone who supports me," he said. "My wife and I, we made a decision, and we were excited about it."

Murphy said his son was named after the Biblical character Noah, not for Mets teammate Noah Syndergaard.

"People are going to say you named him after the monstrosity that throws like 1,000 miles an hour," Murphy said. "We didn't. Noah came from Noah's Ark. Peace and rest is what it means."

Baby Noah kept his parents awake at 3 a.m. Wednesday.

"We had our first panic session. It was dark. She tried to change a diaper, couldn't do it. I came in," he said. "It was just the three of us, 3 o'clock in the morning, all freaking out. He was the only one screaming. I wanted to."

NOTES: Murphy took the roster spot of OF Chris Young, who was put on the 15-day disabled list because of tightness in his right quadriceps.

Sampson introduced as Houston's basketball coach

HOUSTON (AP) Houston introduced Kelvin Sampson as their men's basketball coach on Thursday, confident that he can bring the once-proud program back to prominence and undeterred by his past improprieties with the NCAA.

Sampson committed numerous NCAA violations regarding impermissible calls to recruits at both Oklahoma and Indiana, resulting in a five-year show cause order from the NCAA in 2008 which effectively barred him from coaching in college. That order expired last year.

On Thursday, Sampson vowed that NCAA compliance will be his staff's highest priority and didn't shy away from his checkered past when he was introduced as the successor to James Dickey, who resigned last month citing family issues.

"Mistakes were made, lessons were learned, while I don't agree with all the conclusions that the NCAA made, I respect their decision and respect the NCAA as an institution," Sampson said in his opening comments.

Though Sampson touched on his past troubles on Thursday, he wasn't exactly thrilled at repeated questions about his NCAA violations.

"I'm excited about the future," he said. "That stuff is in the past - all of it."

He takes over a program with a rich history that has fallen on tough times in the last two decades. The Cougars have made 19 NCAA tournaments, but just one of those appearances has come since 1992 and they finished 17-16 this season. These Cougars are far removed from the Phi Slama Jama teams starring Hakeem Olajuwon, Elvin Hayes and Clyde Drexler in the 1980s which made five Final Four trips, including three in a row from 1982-84.

Sampson, who has been an assistant with the Houston Rockets since 2011, coached Oklahoma from 1994-2006 and Indiana from 2006-08. He made 11 NCAA tournaments during his tenure at Oklahoma, reaching the round of 16 in 1999, the Final Four in 2002 and the round of eight in 2003.

The 58-year-old Sampson has a 500-270 in 25 seasons as a head coach with stops at Washington State and Montana Tech in addition to Oklahoma and Indiana. His success on the court is undeniable; the problems came from what happened off the court.

Athletic director Mack Rhoades said they fully vetted Sampson and have no concerns about him because of his checkered past with the NCAA.

"Not after we sat down and talked and did all the research we did and we got to know him," Rhoades said. "He was completely honest, candid, transparent, remorseful. (He) knew that he'd made mistakes and we've got great, great comfort with Kelvin Sampson being our head coach."

He believes that Sampson can help get the program back to where it once was.

"It was one of those cases where it was just a perfect match," Rhoades said. "We hit it off and I think he believes in what we're trying to get done at this university."

Sampson was an assistant with the Milwaukee Bucks before joining the Rockets and some thought he'd never coach in college again after the show cause order.

"I didn't know if I wanted to coach in college again," he said. "I don't think the question should be did I expect to, it's rather if I wanted to our not? I enjoyed every minute of the six years I spent in the NBA."

Sampson is popular with players and fellow coaches alike and Rockets' All-Star James Harden and point guard Pat Beverley were on campus Thursday for his introduction at Houston.

"To see him going back to what he loves in a head coaching job is amazing," Harden said. "He's a great coach, tremendous head coach and I'm glad he has another opportunity at it."

Warren's father: NBA decision could come Tuesday

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) North Carolina State's T.J. Warren will take a little longer to decide whether he'll enter the NBA draft as a sophomore.

Warren's father said Thursday in an interview with The Associated Press that the Atlantic Coast Conference player of the year could be ready to announce his plans Tuesday. Former Wolfpack player Tony Warren says he wants his son to take his time and "be 100 percent sure," though he expects the 6-foot-8 forward could be a top-20 pick.

Warren averaged 24.9 points and shot 52.5 percent to become the third player to lead the conference in scoring and shooting percentage in the same year. Warren was named a second-team All-American earlier this week.

Marshall, McDermott take home AP yearly awards

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) Wichita State coach Gregg Marshall is growing accustomed to being center stage at the Final Four. He just wishes his team was with him this time around.

After leading the Shockers to the national semifinals a year ago, Marshall deftly guided them through a perfect regular season, earning a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament. While they were done in by Kentucky in the third round, by then the votes had already been tabulated.

Marshall was the runaway winner of the AP coach of the year award.

He accepted his hardware during a news conference Thursday at AT&T Stadium, where the Wildcats will play Wisconsin and UConn will meet Florida in the national semifinals Saturday night.

"I'm truly honored," Marshall said. "It's amazing what our young guys and our program were able to accomplish this year, with the tremendous win streak and the run they took us all on. I've been coaching for a long time, but when you have a group like this, they make it really special."

Speaking of special, Creighton star Doug McDermott was a near-unanimous pick as the AP player of the year after a senior season that left him the fifth-leading scorer in Division I history.

McDermott received all but one vote from the 65-member panel that votes for the Top 25. Russ Smith of Louisville received the only dissenting vote.

"This is a huge honor," said McDermott, who was joined at the news conference by his father, Creighton coach Greg McDermott, along with his mother and sister.

"It's been a heck of a ride," McDermott said. "It has been a great four years."

The award ceremony was also a reunion for Marshall and McDermott, who became familiar with each other when Wichita State and Creighton tussled for Missouri Valley supremacy.

But when the Bluejays skipped to the Big East, it cleared the way for Marshall's Shockers to romp through a weakened league and have one of the finest seasons in Division I history.

Wichita State won its first 35 games, a record for a men's major college program, and became the first team to enter the NCAA tournament with a perfect record since UNLV in 1991. With his motto of "play angry," the Shockers embodied the intense nature of their blue-collar coach, who came up through tiny schools such as Randolph-Macon to reach the pinnacle of his sport.

Along the way, the Shockers captured their first Missouri Valley tournament title since 1987 and landed forward Cleanthony Early and point guard Fred VanVleet on the AP's All-America teams.

"I tell you what, they made it easy to coach," Marshall told AP. "You enjoy going to work every single day. Even with the loss to Kentucky, they never wavered. They wanted to be a special group, and they wanted to do things that have never been done."

That loss to the Wildcats still stings, though. The heavyweights from the SEC were given a No. 8 seed in the NCAA tournament, meaning Wichita State had to face them in the opening weekend, and the two teams waged a thrilling game that came down to VanVleet's missed shot at the buzzer.

"Ultimately, some point down the road, we'll look back on this season, and look back fondly," Marshall said, "but at this point, gosh, I wish we were still playing."

Marshall received 44 votes for coach of the year. Tony Bennett of Virginia got 13, followed by Florida's Billy Donovan with six and Michigan's John Beilein and SMU's Larry Brown with one each.

There wasn't nearly as much indecision in voting for McDermott, who led the Bluejays to a No. 3 seed in the NCAA tournament. And while their season ended in a loss to Baylor, it was only a blip on an otherwise remarkable career that left his proud pop feeling nostalgic.

"It's hard to believe on a lot of levels," Greg McDermott told AP. "As his father, I still see him as a little scrawny kid in a lot of ways."

One that blossomed into a dynamic, 6-foot-8 forward who led the nation in scoring at nearly 27 points per game and finished with a staggering 3,150 for his career.

Earlier this year, he was voted a first-team All-American, the first player since Patrick Ewing and Wayman Tisdale in 1985 to earn the nod three straight years.

"I knew Doug was going to be player of the year much sooner than I thought I could be coach of the year," Marshall said. "He can certainly play on any level and he proved that this year."

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