National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Seahawks acquire QB Terrelle Pryor

ALAMEDA, Calif. (AP) The Oakland Raiders have traded away the final player drafted by late owner Al Davis.

Oakland dealt quarterback Terrelle Pryor to the Seattle Seahawks on Monday for a seventh-round pick in next month's draft.

The Raiders fulfilled Pryor's wish to be traded a day before the start of their offseason program. Pryor had asked to be dealt after the season when he lost his starting job to undrafted rookie Matt McGloin, and the Raiders made the move after acquiring Matt Schaub from Houston to be the starter.

Pryor said on Twitter: "Thank you Mr Davis and Raidernation for the unbelievable support!! I will miss the Fans and all of the teammates I have met over the years with the Raiders organization!!"

The Raiders took Pryor in the third round of the supplemental draft in 2011, less than two months before Davis died. Pryor was suspended for the first five games by Commissioner Roger Goodell, who ruled he must miss the time he would have served under a suspension had he stayed at Ohio State.

Pryor got on the field only once as a rookie, committing a false start before his first play. He then played sparingly late in his second season before beating out general manager Reggie McKenzie's hand-picked starter, Matt Flynn, in training camp last summer.

Pryor showed flashes of what he could do early in the season, completing 68.1 percent of his passes for 845 yards, four touchdowns, two interceptions and a 97.6 passer rating in his first four starts. He also brought the running element to Oakland's offense and set an NFL record for quarterbacks with a 93-yard touchdown run on the first play from scrimmage against Pittsburgh on Oct. 27.

That was the final real highlight of his first year as a starter. He lost his job to McGloin a few weeks later after struggling through a knee injury in a loss to the New York Giants. Pryor had completed 50.1 percent of his passes for 714 yards with one touchdown, eight interceptions and a 44.2 passer rating in his four starts before losing his job.

He played only sparingly after that until starting the season finale against Denver. Pryor finished the season having completed 156 of 272 passes for 1,798 yards, seven touchdowns and 11 interceptions, with a passer rating of 69.1. He also rushed for 576 yards on 83 carries, but was sacked 31 times.

Pryor will compete with Tarvaris Jackson and B.J. Daniels for the backup job to Russell Wilson on the Super Bowl champion Seahawks.

"Terrelle is an incredibly explosive athlete and we're excited for him to come in and compete," Seahawks general manager John Schneider said in a statement.

The Raiders had already decided to go in a different direction at quarterback when they traded a sixth-round pick to Houston for Schaub. Coach Dennis Allen had already chosen Schaub as his starter and McGloin is in place as the backup. Oakland could still draft a quarterback next month.

Portland's Aldridge will be ready for Game 2

HOUSTON (AP) A day after etching his name in Portland's record books with a franchise playoff-record 46 points in Game 1 of the first-round playoff series against Houston, LaMarcus Aldridge was already looking forward.

"It was a true blessing to play on that level and to be in that select company and I'm happy about it and it's time to move on," Aldridge said.

The Trail Blazers rallied from a 10-point fourth quarter deficit and got a 122-120 overtime win on Sunday night.

Aldridge's big night got off to a slow start and he said Monday that he felt bad before the game and was worried he might have a fever.

"When the game started I still kind of felt junky my first few shots and I was kind of like: `Oh man,"' he said. "And the second half I just kind of found it."

Did he ever. Aldridge made almost 55 percent of his shots including both of his 3-point attempts in a night where he scored the most points of his career. He also dominated on the glass, grabbing 18 rebounds and blocking two shots.

Houston coach Kevin McHale was left shaking his head at what the 28-year-old did to his team. Aldridge is known by the nickname "L-Train" and McHale and the Rockets did not have an answer for him on Sunday.

"We've got to slow him down," McHale said. "He was just a runaway train last night."

Dwight Howard said the Rockets will try to throw some different matchups at Aldridge in Game 2 on Wednesday night to try and keep him in check. But, he said the key to containing him might come on the other end of the court.

"We've got to go right back at him," Howard said. "He got a rest on defense. We've got to make him play defense - make him use his energy on the defensive end instead of just trying to get rebounds. We need to attack."

James Harden hated how easy the Rockets made things for Aldridge in Game 1.

"He was just too comfortable out there offensively," Harden said. "He got the ball where he wanted to and one or two dribbles and boom right by the rim. So we have to make it more difficult on him."

Sunday's game was made even more special for Aldridge because he is from Dallas and starred at the University of Texas. He always loves playing in his home state, but Sunday night's game certainly ranked as his favorite game here.

"It was perfect," he said.

He took the game ball to save as a memento of his great night, but didn't do anything special to celebrate the feat. He simply had a low-key postgame dinner with some teammates and his mother Georgia, who was one of less than five relatives he invited to attend the game.

"I was so exhausted that I ate with my mom and then I went to sleep," he said. "She was so excited. She was acting like it was 3 o'clock in the afternoon instead of 2 a.m.."

Aldridge fouled out with about a minute left in overtime on Sunday night and Damian Lillard, who was making his playoff debut, finished it off by scoring five straight points to end with 31. The pair became the first teammates to score at least 45 and 30 points in a game in the playoffs since Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen did it in 1992.

Aldridge had some fun after the game, stopping to tease former Trail Blazer and current Rockets' broadcaster Clyde Drexler about surpassing one of his records. Drexler holds a number of career records for Portland, and Aldridge's 46 points drops Drexler's 42 points down to third on the team's list of top playoff performances.

But Aldridge, who has been with the Trail Blazers his entire career, is more focused on helping the team than on individual accomplishments. The Blazers are in the postseason for the first time since 2011 and they haven't advanced to the second round since losing in the Western Conference finals in 2000.

"I like winning and I feel like great players are always tied to winning," he said. "A lot of guys have scored points but only certain guys have won and scored points. If I can win a championship then I think my body of work ... will mean more."

Bengals exercise WR A.J. Green's option for 2015

CINCINNATI (AP) The Bengals exercised a 2015 contract option for receiver A.J. Green on Monday, letting them turn their focus to an extension for quarterback Andy Dalton.

Green was the fourth overall pick in the 2011 draft and was entering the final season on his deal. The collective bargaining agreement allows teams to exercise a fifth-year option on players drafted in the top 10. The Bengals will have to pay him the average of the top 10 receivers in the NFL.

Green has 3,833 yards receiving in his first three seasons, trailing only Randy Moss' 4,163 yards in his first three seasons. He set club records with six 100-yard receiving games and five straight 100-yard games last season. He finished with 1,426 yards, trailing only Chad Johnson's club record of 1,440 yards.

Bengals owner Mike Brown said at the NFL's annual meeting last month that he planned to exercise the fifth-year option on Green, which had to be done by the first week in May.

"It's what is in the new CBA," Green said on Monday morning. "There's nothing I can do about it."

By exercising the option, Bengals can wait until after next season to talk to Green about a long-term deal.

"That's one thing I don't ever worry about, that business side," Green said. "I feel like my body of work speaks for itself. So whenever the time is right, it happens."

Dalton was taken in the second round in 2011, so he's not subject to an option year. His deal expires after this season. Dalton said on Monday that the Bengals have talked to him about an extension, but nothing appears to be imminent.

Knicks fire coach Mike Woodson after lost season

NEW YORK (AP) Mike Woodson had the Knicks on top of their division and in the second round of the playoffs, destinations that had become unreachable and practically unimaginable in New York.

A year later, he was out of job.

Phil Jackson fired Woodson and the entire coaching staff on Monday, making his first big move since becoming team president in March and saying in a statement that "the time has come for change throughout the franchise."

The dismissal comes shortly after the Knicks completed a 37-45 season that began with their belief they were a serious contender.

Instead, they started poorly, making Woodson's job security practically a season-long distraction. A late surge wasn't good enough for a postseason spot or another year for Woodson.

It was a stunningly swift fall for Woodson, whose .580 winning percentage with the Knicks ranks behind only Pat Riley and Jeff Van Gundy, and who finished third in the NBA's Coach of the Year voting after going 54-28 last season.

He and the staff were informed of the decision Monday morning by Jackson, the man the Knicks originally wanted to replace Woodson as coach but preferred to run the team's front office.

Jackson has won an NBA-record 11 championships as a coach. He has repeatedly said he's not interested in returning to the bench, so he will have to hire someone before he turns his attention to the roster. The team said the coaching search begins immediately.

Jackson said he has a "tremendous amount of respect" for Woodson and his staff, which included longtime Knicks assistant Herb Williams. Jackson called this an "extremely difficult" season and said "blame should not be put on one individual."

"But the time has come for change throughout the franchise as we start the journey to assess and build this team for next season and beyond," he added.

Jackson has said he won't insist the Knicks run the triangle, the offensive system he used in Chicago and with the Lakers, but has made clear his belief in it. TNT analyst Steve Kerr, who played for Jackson with the Bulls but has never been a coach, has repeatedly been mentioned as a top candidate.

Kerr said Monday during his SiriusXM NBA Radio show that he and Jackson have remained close and that he expected to speak with him at some point about the job.

"It's going to be very interesting and obviously my name is being thrown around. I do anticipate at least being part of the conversation and we'll see where it all goes," Kerr said.

Jackson is scheduled to speak with reporters on Wednesday.

Woodson, a former Knicks first-round draft pick, was hired as an assistant coach before the 2011-12 season, then engineered an 18-6 finish after replacing Mike D'Antoni on an interim basis the following March to capture a playoff spot. Given a multiyear deal two months later, Woodson then led the Knicks to their first Atlantic Division championship since 1994.

New York then beat Boston in the playoffs, its first series victory since 2000, and general manager Steve Mills picked up next season's option year on Woodson's contract before this season began.

But the Knicks were saddled with some early injuries, including center Tyson Chandler's broken leg, and lacked the veteran leadership they enjoyed last season. Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan was already considering replacing Woodson by December, when he met with Jackson at a holiday party and talked to him about coaching the team.

Carmelo Anthony praised his coach Thursday and even offered to back him publicly if necessary. But it was probably a clear sign Woodson wouldn't be back a few minutes later when Amare Stoudemire said the coach hadn't taken part in the exit meetings with players that Jackson and Mills held.

Woodson previously coached six seasons with the Atlanta Hawks, leading them to the playoffs in his final three seasons. He has a career record of 315-365.

Woodson went 109-79 with the Knicks, who hadn't even made the playoffs since 2004 before he led them there in 2012. But he lost one of his biggest supporters within the organization when general manager Glen Grunwald, Woodson's college teammate at Indiana, was surprisingly fired last September.

Players and fans sometimes grumbled during the season about Woodson's strategies as the defense regressed and the offense was inconsistent beyond Anthony, who plans to become a free agent in July. Chandler said there probably was some "disconnect" and "misunderstanding" at times.

"Coach Woodson put together a game plan for us on the basketball court and there were times we didn't totally buy into it," Stoudemire said last week.

Still, the Knicks nearly rallied to make the playoffs by winning 16 of their final 21 games. But Woodson, who said he and Jackson had only brief chats in Jackson's first month in charge, said before the season finale he knew the coach often takes the blame.

"Everyone in this franchise owes a great deal of gratitude to what Mike and his staff have done," Jackson said. "We wish him the best."

Timberwolves' Rick Adelman retiring after 23 years

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) As his 23rd season as an NBA coach entered the home stretch, Rick Adelman looked tired.

Tired of trying to wring a few more wins out of a talented, defensively deficient roster. Tired of getting on an airplane at midnight after a game and landing somewhere across the country at 3 a.m. Tired, most of all, of putting his wife Mary Kay and her lingering health issues second to a job that, when done right, is all-consuming.

So when he finally decided to step away, announcing his retirement from the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday, he did so with mixed feelings about the pressure-cooker life he is leaving behind and the one that awaits him.

"It becomes your life, your family's life, an everyday routine," Adelman said of the NBA. "It's a real grind. You get some time off in the summer but it's pretty much on your mind all the time, so there's some sadness but there's also a relief. I'm ready and my wife's ready to move on to another phase. We're looking forward to that."

Adelman and the Timberwolves had a mutual option in place in the four-year contract he signed in 2011. His announcement did not come as a surprise after the Wolves finished a disappointing 40-42, but it nevertheless marked an unceremonious end to a career that includes 1,042 victories, putting him eighth on the NBA's career list. He coached Western Conference powers in Portland and Sacramento and also had stops in Golden State and Houston.

Adelman said the time is right for him to step aside and spend more time with Mary Kay, who has been treated for seizures over the last two years. He also thinks the Wolves need a fresh voice to help them try to persuade star power forward Kevin Love to remain in Minnesota.

"If anything, I felt if I coached another year and then his future comes up and my future is gone, that makes it even harder," Adelman said. "I think it's best for the organization to have somebody else coaching the team, give them a year to see what they can do and hear that voice. I think that's a much more positive situation for the organization. I feel strongly about that."

After missing the playoffs for the third straight season, the 67-year-old Adelman decided it was time to walk away from one of the most quietly influential coaching careers in NBA history. The introverted coach worked below the radar for most of his career, but his impact on the league is unquestioned.

Adelman won at least 50 games in a season 11 times in his career, led the Portland Trail Blazers to two NBA Finals appearances and then developed a post-passing offense in Sacramento that continues to influence the league. He had more modest success with Houston and Minnesota, but walks away with his fingerprints all over the league.

While with the Kings, Adelman worked with assistant and former Princeton coach Pete Carril to fine-tune his famed "corner" offense, a precision system that maximized the talents of big men Chris Webber, Vlade Divac and Brad Miller, all of whom were gifted passers from the elbow of the lane.

"A lot of people have run the elbow action, but no one's run it like him," Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. "He started doing it in Portland and then in Sac, everywhere he's gone he's won for the most part. He's one of the better coaches that we've ever had in the league and a lot of people don't realize that. And I think that's too bad. But he's been good for the game. He's brought a lot to the game."

"I've stolen from him, very honestly," Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said.

Adelman's final season in Minnesota was a frustrating one, with Nikola Pekovic missing 28 games, Chase Budinger never fully healthy after offseason knee surgery and a team that beat the Thunder, Heat, Spurs, Grizzlies, Rockets and Pacers but also lost to the Kings, Magic and Jazz.

Now the team heads into a precarious summer, with President Flip Saunders needing to find the right coach and make the right personnel moves to keep Love, who can opt out of his contract after next season.

Michigan State's Tom Izzo, a friend of Saunders for years, ESPN analyst George Karl and former Memphis coach Lionel Hollins are among the candidates likely to be considered to take over a team that has the longest-running playoff drought in the league at 10 years. Saunders himself could also take over, though owner Glen Taylor has said he prefers to keep Saunders in the front office.

Saunders hinted Monday that a coach who has experience running the show is the preference.

"Be demanding, hold players accountable, just like any good coach, everyone has the same formula what you are looking for," Saunders said. "We are more geared toward bringing someone who has a track record, who's had some success."

Adelman said he had "a sour taste" with how this season finished, especially with a lackluster effort in a season-ending home loss to the Jazz. He's not sure what he's going to do with all his free time. Probably play a lot of golf, definitely spend Christmas at home with his family and just maybe - "You never say never" - listen to another coaching offer down the road.

Adelman said a return is very unlikely, and it sounded believable when he was asked what it was going to feel like to wake up on Tuesday morning without the job to worry about. He smiled and his face brightened.

"It's going to be good," he said.

NYCFC to play 2015 home games at Yankee Stadium

NEW YORK (AP) New York City FC will play homes games at Yankee Stadium during its first season in 2015.

Yankees chief operating officer Lonn Trost said at a news conference Monday he anticipated the upper deck would be closed off, leaving capacity at 33,444, down from the ballpark's baseball capacity of 49,642.

Trost said it will take three days to convert field from baseball to soccer, although in a rush it could be cut to 2 1/2, and the same amount of time to switch it back. The pitcher's mound will be removed each time with a clawlike structure, stored and replaced.

The soccer field, which runs from the first-base dugout to left field, will be 110 by 70 yards, slightly shorter and narrower than the preferred 115-by-74 yards. NYCFC is working on plans to build a permanent soccer-specific home in New York City and hasn't given a timetable for how long it will play at Yankee Stadium.

Retired Yankees closer Mariano Rivera attended the news conference in his role as NYCFC's first season-ticket holder.

NYCFC, co-owned by Manchester City and the Yankees, joins MLS next year along with Orlando as the league expands to 21 teams. Atlanta joins the league in 2017 and David Beckham has been given a Miami team that starts play at an unspecified date.

Bobcats C Jefferson: I'll play in Game 2 vs. Heat

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) Bobcats center Al Jefferson said that while his left foot remains extremely sore, he plans to play in Game 2 of the best-of-seven playoff series Wednesday night against Miami Heat.

"I'm suiting up," Jefferson said Monday. "It's going to take more than that to make me sit out. We have worked too hard to get to this point."

Jefferson injured his foot in the first quarter of Sunday's 99-88 loss to the two-time defending NBA champions.

Charlotte's leading scorer skipped a light team workout Monday and said he doesn't plan to practice Tuesday. That means he won't test out the foot until the shoot around period on Wednesday morning.

His left foot remains in a walking boot and he'll continue to receive treatment for the next two days.

First-year coach Steve Clifford said the medical staff informed him Jefferson doesn't run the risk of serious injury if he continues to play on the injured foot.

Clifford also said the injury won't require surgery this offseason.

"There would be no long term effects, nothing that could be permanent going forward. So that part we're not worried about," Clifford said.

In essence, the injury is all about the 6-foot-10, 289-pound Jefferson managing the pain, something the 10-year NBA veteran said he didn't do well in Game 1 even though he finished with 18 points and 10 rebounds in the loss.

"I have to adjust to the pain," Jefferson said. "I have to go out there and know that it's going to be there and have that mindset. To me that will make me handle it a lot better. Last game it came out of nowhere and I didn't know what I was limited to and what I could and couldn't do. Now I know."

Jefferson received two pain killer injections during Sunday's game after injuring the foot in the first quarter while coming off a double screen.

He said he will continue to receive injections to handle the pain throughout the series.

"They are going to be my new best friend," he said with a laugh.

After Sunday's game, Heat center/power forward Chris Bosh said Miami went after Jefferson to test his injured foot.

The Bobcats are expecting the Heat will run plenty of pick and rolls at Jefferson to test his mobility in Game 2.

But Clifford seems more worried about Jefferson's play on the offensive end, rather this ability to adjust on defense.

"I thought it hampered him a lot more offensively than defensively," Clifford said. "We watched on film a couple of the pick and rolls and he defended them fine. His problem is he can't pivot hard off that foot and that is such a big part of his game - the quick spins, going one way, faking and going back the other way. I thought it hurt his offense a lot more than his defense."

Point guard Kemba Walker, who led the Bobcats in scoring in Game 1, said he and his teammates are going to have to help pick up the slack if Jefferson is limited.

"I definitely think I have to increase my level of play and be a lot more aggressive offensively," Walker said. "Other guys as well. I think everyone is looking forward to that challenge."

Clifford's other concern heading into Game 2 is limiting turnovers.

Charlotte turned it over 15 times leading to 20 points for the Heat.

"They don't need 20 points," Jefferson said.

Said Clifford: "We need maximum concentration and maximum intensity, starting with the turnovers. You have to concentrate on the reasons you win and you play well. I think we can do better."

Aldridge leads Portland over Houston 122-120 in OT

HOUSTON (AP) LaMarcus Aldridge scored a franchise playoff-record 46 points and Damian Lillard added 31, including the go-ahead free throws in overtime, to lift the Portland Trail Blazers to a 122-120 victory over the Houston Rockets on Sunday night in Game 1 of their first-round playoff series.

Aldridge fouled out with about a minute left in overtime and Lillard, who was making his playoff debut, took over. He scored the next five points for Portland and put the Trail Blazers on top by one point with a pair of free throws with 17 seconds left.

Game 2 is Wednesday night in Houston.

Aldridge, who was playing in his home state, also had 18 rebounds and two blocks. James Harden and Dwight Howard each scored 27 points for Houston.

Sharks take 2-0 series lead with 7-2 win vs. Kings

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) Fourth-liners Mike Brown and Raffi Torres scored second-period goals to spark a San Jose comeback and lead the Sharks to a 7-2 victory Sunday over the Los Angeles Kings and a 2-0 lead in their first-round series.

Justin Braun, Patrick Marleau, Joe Pavelski, Logan Couture and Joe Thornton also scored for the Sharks, who overcame a two-goal deficit after the first period of a playoff game for just the third time in 26 tries in franchise history. Antti Niemi made 24 saves.

Jake Muzzin and Trevor Lewis scored first-period goals before Jonathan Quick allowed seven goals in the final two periods. Los Angeles heads home for Game 3 on Tuesday looking to get back into this series.

The Kings can take comfort in the fact that the home team has won 18 of the previous 19 games between these teams, including nine in the playoffs.

Nene dominates, Wizards rally past Bulls, 102-93

CHICAGO (AP) Nene dominated with 24 points, Trevor Ariza scored 18, and the Washington Wizards rallied from 13 down to beat the Chicago Bulls 102-93 in their playoff opener on Sunday night.

John Wall scored 16 in his postseason debut. Marcin Gortat added 15 points and 13 rebounds, and the fifth-seeded Wizards pulled out the victory even though they looked like they were ready to be blown out.

They cut a 13-point deficit to one in the third and trailed by three going into the fourth, before outscoring Chicago 18-6 over the final six minutes to come out on top in their first playoff appearance since 2008.

Game 2 is Tuesday.

Gortat's layup started the decisive run, and Trevor Ariza gave the Wizards an 88-87 lead when he hit a pair of free throws with 4:17 remaining. Jimmy Butler tied it for Chicago with one of his own, but a layup by Gortat and basket by Nene made it 92-88, and Washington hung on after Chicago's Joakim Noah cut it to two on a tip-in with 2:11 left.

Gortat hit two free throws and added a jumper with 34 seconds left to make it a six-point game, and the Wizards took the early lead in the best-of-seven series.

Red Sox remember Boston Marathon victims

BOSTON (AP) The Boston Red Sox held an emotional 20-minute pregame ceremony honoring victims of the Boston Marathon bombings along with law enforcement officials, medical personnel, runners and race volunteers before Sunday night's game against the Baltimore Orioles.

With canvasses of handwritten notes from each of the 50 states being held on the outfield warning track from the left field corner in front of the Green Monster around to the Pesky Pole, a number of victims came walking in from the left-field corner to a loud ovation.

Just over a year ago, two bombs exploded near the finish line - less than a mile from Fenway Park, killing three and injuring over 260 others. It happened about an hour after Boston had defeated Tampa Bay.

The family of Lu Lingzi, a Boston University graduate student from China that was killed in the bombings, made their first ever visit to Fenway Park and closed the ceremony with the traditional "Play Ball!" chant before the Red Sox took the field.

Before the victims entered, police and medical personnel came from canvas alley along the right-field line before runners came in from center field and race volunteers also came straight in from the outfield. They all lined up in the outfield grass near the University of Massachusetts band that played the national anthem.

Jim Gallagher, the president of the One Fund, a fund created to help victims and their families, threw out the ceremonial first pitch to David Ortiz. Former Boston Mayor Tom Menino, current Mayor Marty Walsh and Gov. Deval Patrick were behind the pitcher's mound.

There was a video tribute of the race and victims played with the backdrop music of Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising."

The ceremony was held exactly one year after the Red Sox played their first game in Fenway following the bombings.

Before that game, Ortiz had a stirring moment when he spoke to the crowd and had a rousing speech that included an expletive.

The 118th Boston Marathon is scheduled for Monday and the Red Sox play their annual 11 a.m. Patriots' Day game, also against the Orioles.

On Friday, Ortiz said during a press conference that he'd like to visit the finish line.

Anna, Beltran key Yankees' 5-1, 12-inning win

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) Dean Anna drew a bases-loaded walk on a full-count pitch with two outs in the 12th inning and Carlos Beltran followed with a two-run single as the New York Yankees beat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-1 on Sunday.

Yangervis Solarte was walked by Heath Bell (0-1) to open the 12th. After failing twice to bunt against C.J. Riefenhauser, Brett Gardner reached on a fielder's choice and went to third on Brian McCann's two-out single. Jacoby Ellsbury was intentionally walked before Anna checked his swing to complete an eight-pitch at-bat and score the go-ahead run.

Beltran had his hit off Josh Leuke before Alfonso Soriano added an RBI single that made it 5-1.

Preston Claiborne (1-0) went two scoreless innings for the Yankees.

The teams split a wild four-game series. After the Yankees beat David Price and the Rays 10-2 in Thursday's opener, Tampa Bay rebounded for 11-5 and 16-1 victories Friday and Saturday.

Derek Jeter opened the 11th with a single off Bell. Ichiro Suzuki pinch-ran for Jeter stole second with one out, but Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon challenged the call and after a 2 minute, 4 second delay the umpires changed the close call to out.

New York took a 1-0 lead in the fourth when Gardner was given an RBI double after a challenge by Yankees manager Joe Girardi. The umpires first ruled that Rays right fielder Wil Myers had caught Gardner's drive at the wall for the third out. The call was overturned following a 2:17 delay after replays clearly showed Myers caught the ball after it hit off the top of the wall.

Soriano, who opened the fourth with a double, was on the third and was awarded home on the overturned decision.

Tampa Bay tied it at 1 on pinch-hitter Matt Joyce's two-out sacrifice fly in the seventh. The Rays capitalized after second baseman Brian Roberts dropped a throw on a force play earlier in the inning.

New York starter Vidal Nuno, in the mix to take the spot of injured starter Ivan Nova, allowed three hits over five shutout innings. The Yankees put Nova, who was hurt in Saturday's game, on the 15-day disabled list with a partial ulnar collateral ligament tear in his right elbow that could require surgery.

Cesar Ramos, who replaced the injured Matt Moore in the Rays' rotation, gave up one run and four hits in five innings. Moore is scheduled to have elbow ligament replacement surgery Tuesday.

Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira had a second-inning single in his first at-bat and finished 2 for 5 after being activated from the 15-day disabled list before the game.

Teixeira hurt an adductor muscle that runs alongside the hamstring trying to make a play on a foul grounder during an April 4 game against Toronto.

NOTES: Tampa Bay CF Desmond Jennings (groin) was out of the lineup for the third straight game. ... Yankees RHP Masahiro Tanaka (2-0) and Red Sox LHP Jon Lester (2-2) will start in the opener of a three-game series at Fenway Park Tuesday night. ... Rays LHP David Price (2-1) and Minnesota RHP Kyle Gibson (3-0) will pitch Tuesday night to start a three-game series. ... Olympic swimmer Katie Hoff got a marriage proposal from her boyfriend just before throwing the ceremonial first pitch.

Brewers win in 14th after early brawl with Pirates

PITTSBURGH (AP) Khris Davis delivered the biggest hit in a game interrupted by a punch-filled brawl, homering in the 14th inning to lift the Milwaukee Brewers over the Pittsburgh Pirates 3-2 Sunday.

Brewers center fielder Carlos Gomez, Pirates outfielder Travis Snider and Milwaukee bench coach Jerry Narron were ejected after the third-inning fracas.

The problems started when Gomez paused at the plate and flipped his bat after hitting a two-out triple. Gerrit Cole, who was near third base backing up the play, stormed toward Gomez and they exchanged words.

Gomez took a couple steps toward Cole before players rushed the field from both dugouts. Milwaukee's Martin Maldonado threw a punch that knocked off Snider's hat.

The Brewers won their third in a row and sent Pittsburgh to its third straight loss.

James, Wade lead Heat past Bobcats 99-88 in Game 1

MIAMI (AP) LeBron James scored 27 points, Dwyane Wade added 23 and the Miami Heat used a late charge to beat the Charlotte Bobcats 99-88 on Sunday in Game 1 of their Eastern Conference first-round series.

Chris Bosh scored 13 points and James Jones had 12 for the Heat. Game 2 of the best-of-seven series is Wednesday.

Kemba Walker scored 20 points for the Bobcats, who led by nine early and led again in the third. Al Jefferson missed eight of his final 13 shots after getting hurt in the first quarter. He finished with 18 points and 10 rebounds for the Bobcats, who got 17 from Gary Neal and 15 from Josh McRoberts.

Miami sealed it with an 18-4 run in the fourth, all but three of those points coming with James getting a rest.

Bruins top Red Wings 4-1, even series at 1-1

BOSTON (AP) Justin Florek and Reilly Smith scored in a three-minute span in the first period and the Boston Bruins evened their playoff series with a 4-1 win over the Detroit Red Wings in the Game 2 on Sunday.

Showing more spark after not taking enough challenging shots on goal in their 1-0 loss Friday night, the Bruins had 18 shots in the first period after managing just 25 in the entire opener.

Luke Glendening cut Boston's lead to 2-1 at 13:20 of the second period before Milan Lucic scored late in the second and Zdeno Chara added a power-play goal early in the third.

Game 3 of the best-of-seven series between the top-seeded Bruins, who won the Presidents' Cup with an NHL-high 117 points, and eighth-seeded Red Wings is set for Detroit on Tuesday night.

Yankees' RHP Nova on DL due to elbow ligament tear

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) New York Yankees right-hander Ivan Nova has a partial tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his pitching elbow, an injury that often requires Tommy John surgery.

Nova left Saturday night's game against Tampa Bay in the fifth inning. An MRI after the game revealed the injury and he was placed on the 15-day disabled list.

"It's hard," Nova said. "I really don't know what to say. I'm sad right now."

Nova will be further examined Monday in New York by Yankees team physician Dr. Chris Ahmad. He had no discomfort in the elbow until his 82nd and final pitch Saturday when he felt a pop.

If Nova needs elbow-ligament replacement surgery he could be sidelined more than a year.

"Usually when you have that (tear), it eventually leads to that," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said.

David Phelps, Adam Warren and Vidal Nuno, started and threw five shutout innings Sunday against Tampa Bay, are in the mix to replace Nova. Alfredo Aceves is starting in the minors for the Yankees at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

The Yankees also, as expected, reinstated first baseman Mark Teixeira from the 15-day disabled list and he was in the starting lineup for Sunday's game against Tampa Bay.

Teixeira hurt an adductor muscle that runs alongside the hamstring trying to make a play on a foul grounder during an April 4 game against Toronto.

New York recalled right-hander Preston Claiborne from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and right-hander Bryan Mitchell from Double-A Trenton. Infielder Scott Sizemore was optioned to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, while reliever Matt Daley was designated for assignment.

Closer David Robertson, on the DL with a groin strain, is expected to rejoin the team Tuesday.

Robertson felt discomfort April 6 in the ninth inning of a 6-4 win over Toronto and was placed on the disabled list. He is replacing major league saves leader Mariano Rivera, who retired after last season.

Duncan scores 27 points, Spurs beat Mavs 90-85

SAN ANTONIO (AP) Tim Duncan scored 27 points, and the San Antonio Spurs held the Dallas Mavericks to one field goal in the final seven minutes to rally for a 90-85 victory Sunday in Game 1 of their first-round playoff series.

The Mavericks also went scoreless for 5 1/2 minutes during that stretch, their lone field goal coming as time expired.

Tony Parker had 21 points, and Manu Ginobili added 17. Kawhi Leonard had 11 points and 10 rebounds and Tiago Splitter pulled down 11 rebounds for top-seeded San Antonio, which has won 10 straight against Dallas.

Devin Harris scored 19 points for the Mavericks, which nearly pulled off a huge upset.

Flyers rally to beat Rangers 4-2, even series

NEW YORK (AP) Luke Schenn scored the go-ahead goal in the second period, and backup Ray Emery made 31 saves for the Philadelphia Flyers, who rallied to beat the New York Rangers 4-2 on Sunday to even the first-round playoff series.

Schenn put Philadelphia in front after Game 1 goat Jason Akeson tied it 2-2 earlier in the period. That was enough for the Flyers to snap a nine-game losing streak at Madison Square Garden and send the series to Philadelphia tied at 1.

Game 3 is Tuesday night.

Jakub Voracek brought the Flyers within 2-1 in the first after Martin St. Louis and Benoit Pouliot staked New York to the early two-goal lead. Emery did the rest, looking especially sharp in the second and third periods while subbing for injured No. 1 goalie Steve Mason.

Hamilton wins third straight F1 race at Chinese GP

SHANGHAI (AP) Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton captured his third straight Formula One race with ease on Sunday, leading from start to finish to win the Chinese Grand Prix.

Mercedes showed again that it's in a different class from its rivals, with Hamilton's teammate Nico Rosberg taking second place - the third time in four races this season the pair have finished one-two.

"This is a team on a roll, that's for sure," Hamilton said. "I'm going to be working hard, we're going to keep working hard because obviously the others are pushing to catch us."

Ferrari's Fernando Alonso held off fast-charging Red Bull driver Daniel Ricciardo to finish third and give his team its first podium finish of the year, with new team principal Marco Mattiacci watching from the garage.

Ricciardo was fourth, finishing one place ahead of teammate Sebastian Vettel after the four-time defending world champion was asked by his team to allow the faster Ricciardo to pass for the second race in a row.

Hamilton's win gave him his first career hat trick following his victories in Malaysia and Bahrain. The Briton may have even had a fourth win this season but was forced to retire in the season-opener in Australia after starting from pole position due to engine trouble.

With the win, he inched closer to his teammate's lead in the drivers' championship with 75 points, just four behind Rosberg.

Hamilton, who moved one ahead of Jim Clark for most poles by a British driver with the 34th of his career in Shanghai, was cruising so comfortably at the end of Sunday's race that he wasn't even rattled when the checkered flag was mistakenly shown a lap too soon, at the end of lap 55.

"That was very strange. I was thinking, `Am I seeing things?' I looked up, I was coming across the line expecting to do another lap and, all of a sudden, I looked for a split second and I saw the flag," he said.

According to F1 regulations, if the checkered flag is shown early, the official end of the race will be the lap before it was shown. On Sunday, that meant the end of lap 54.

The only racers this affected were Caterham's Kamui Kobayashi and Marussia's Jules Bianchi. Kobayashi had passed the Frenchman on their final lap for 17th place, but their places were reversed in the official results.

Hamilton was so far ahead for much of the race, his rivals were left to battle for second best.

Rosberg, expected to challenge Hamilton in Shanghai after the pair's incredibly tight duel in Bahrain, started fourth on the grid and was forced to play catch-up after a slow start immediately dropped him back to seventh.

The German methodically tracked down the two Red Bulls and finally passed Alonso on the back straight of the 43rd lap, the Ferrari unable to match the speed of the Mercedes.

Rosberg then set his sights on Hamilton but he was by that point too far ahead, finishing nearly 19 seconds clear of the German.

"We have the best car," Rosberg said. "But I was back there, so then catching up was nice with this fast car. It's a good weapon."

Vettel started third on the grid and briefly moved to second before beginning to fade as his tires wore out. After Rosberg passed him, he was asked to give way to Ricciardo on the 25th lap - a repeat of what happened two weeks ago at the Bahrain GP.

Instead of acceding, however, Vettel asked his team what tires Ricciardo was using and when told they were both on mediums, the German responded, "Tough luck." At the start of the next lap, though, Vettel did make way and finished a distant 24 seconds behind his teammate.

Red Bull team principal Christian Horner explained afterward that the team had different tire strategies for the drivers, planning a two-stop race for Ricciardo and a three-stop race for Vettel.

"As soon as (Vettel) understood that, he immediately let him through," he said. "You could see he simply didn't have the pace to hold him back there. It was pointless."

Vettel, who has qualified behind Ricciardo three times to start the season, agreed with the decision given his struggles Sunday.

"I'm not yet where I want to be with the car, but it's an on-going process," he said. "Hopefully at the next few races we will make some more steps in the right direction."

Force India had both its drivers finish in the points with Nico Hulkenberg finishing sixth and Sergio Perez taking ninth.

Williams driver Valtteri Bottas was seventh, Ferrari's Kimi Raikkonen was eighth, and Toro Rosso's Daniil Kyvat finished in 10th, another impressive showing by the 19-year-old debutant.

Hopkins wins split decision over Shumenov

WASHINGTON (AP) Bernard Hopkins made some more boxing history, and did it in rather easy fashion.

Then, the 49-year-old boxer showed his age, referencing a TV character that might have gone over the heads of many young fans.

"I was so in my living room watching Archie Bunker," Hopkins said, playfully comparing himself to the main character from the 1970's series "All in the Family."

"I was so relaxed, so relaxed."

Already the oldest boxer in history to hold a world championship, Hopkins became the oldest to win a unification bout Saturday night as he captured a split 12-round decision over Beibut Shumenov of Kazakhstan.

Afterward, the Philadelphia native sounded far from finished - or satisfied.

"The pound-for-pound best fighter in the world right now is Floyd `Money' Mayweather," Hopkins said. "I'll tell you, behind Andre Ward, who I believe is second and should be, I'm not that far from the top three. My age and the way I'm doing it.

"I'm just telling you, I'm not done yet."

Hopkins was in complete control Saturday and it was reflected in the statistics. Of the 608 punches thrown by Shumenov, only 20 percent landed. Of the 383 punches Hopkins threw, he landed 49 percent.

"I didn't do that when I was 30," Hopkins joked. "He was really surprised the way I could stand there and let him miss."

When the split decision was announced the pro-Hopkins crowd of 6,823 jeered its disapproval. Two judges scored the fight 116-111 for Hopkins. The other judge gave the nod to Shumenov 114-113.

"I shut him out," Hopkins said.

If there was any doubt about the outcome, it was removed in the 11th round when Hopkins rocked Shumenov with a chopping overhand right for the only knockdown of the fight, igniting chants of "B-Hop! B-Hop!" from the D.C. Armory crowd.

It was a reminder for Hopkins of 20 years ago, when he fought for the first time in Washington, losing a decision to Roy Jones Jr. at RFK Stadium, right across the street from the venue where Saturday's fight took place.

"It motivates me every time I come to D.C. The dressing rooms, it took me back," said Hopkins, who improved to 55-6-2.

After a slow start, in which he fought defensively, Hopkins controlled the action, growing confident, aggressive and playful as the fight progressed.

The fourth round saw Shumenov moving forward, but Hopkins landed the two best shots, both right-handed counterpunches, to secure the edge. In the fifth, Hopkins was doing more than counterpunching. A straight overhand right landed squarely to the cheek of Shumenov.

By the sixth round, it was clear that Hopkins' confidence was growing as he became the aggressor, initiating the action and landing a big combination.

In the seventh round, Hopkins was feeling so good that he alternated leading with his right and left hands, befuddling Shumenov, who fell to 14-2.

"I'm kind of angry that I lost the fight," Shumenov said. "I am a true warrior."

Hopkins-Shumenov was one of three world title fights on Saturday. In the first, Peter Quillin of Brooklyn, N.Y., retained his WBO middleweight belt and improved to 31-0 with a unanimous 12-round decision over Lukas Konecky of the Czech Republic.

In the IBF welterweight title match, Shawn Porter of Cleveland also remained undefeated with a fourth-round knockout of Brooklyn's Paulie Malignaggi, who took time off from his job as an analyst for Showtime, which carried the night's action.

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