National News from Yahoo

Lung cancer screening could cost Medicare billions

Every person covered by Medicare would shell out an additional $3 a month if the government agreed to pay to screen certain current and former smokers for lung cancer, a new study estimates.


Why did firm with big Ukraine holdings hire Joe Biden’s son?

In the span of a few weeks, an energy firm little-known inside the United States added two members to its board of directors — scoring connections to Secretary of State John Kerry and Vice President Joe Biden in the bargain.


Christie: Bridge scandal 'will be a footnote' by 2016

WASHINGTON (AP) — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Wednesday that he is thinking about running for president and that by the time 2016 arrives the controversy over last year's George Washington Bridge lane closures "will be a footnote."

Burst pipe in Jerusalem reveals murals of medieval crusades

Wall murals portraying Crusader knights and symbols of medieval military orders have been rediscovered in a Jerusalem hospital thanks to a burst water pipe and a storeroom reorganization. These paintings were the works of a French count, Comte Marie Paul Amédée de Piellat, who believed himself to be a descendant of Crusaders. The count was a frequent visitor to Jerusalem and had the Saint-Louis Hospice built between 1879 and 1896, naming it after St. Louis IX, a king of France and leader of the Seventh Crusade between A.D. 1248 and 1254. The count returned to Jerusalem to restore his murals, but died in the hospital in 1925, his work undone.


Protest erupts in Turkish town where 245 died

SOMA, Turkey (AP) — Anger and grief boiled over into a violent protest Wednesday in the western Turkish town of Soma, where officials said at least 245 miners died in a coal mine explosion and fire.


Obama to Congress: OK new cash for roads, bridges

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is running out of money to repair deteriorating roads, bridges and ports, and President Barack Obama says more federal spending will help avert a looming crisis that could stifle economic growth and torment commuters.


UN photo archive tells story of Palestinian exodus

RAFAH REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip (AP) — A 1975 photo shows Palestinian refugee Fathiyeh Sattari, her eyes wide with worry, as she presents her malnourished baby boy to a doctor at a clinic run by a U.N. aid agency.


What makes mining in Turkey so dangerous?

The mining disaster that killed more than 200 workers in Turkey has underscored the health and safety problems in the country's mining sector.


Ukraine launches talks but its foes are missing

KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukraine's government launched talks Wednesday on decentralizing power as part of a European-backed peace plan but didn't invite its main foes, the pro-Russia insurgents who have declared independence in the east.


Ex-tabloid royal editor: I hacked Kate 155 times

LONDON (AP) — The former royal editor of the News of the World said Wednesday that he repeatedly hacked the voicemails of Prince William, Prince Harry and Kate Middleton in the months before he was arrested for illegal eavesdropping in 2006.


Sept. 11 museum is called a monument to unity

NEW YORK (AP) — Leaders of the soon-to-open Sept. 11 museum portrayed it as a monument to unity and resilience ahead of its dedication Thursday, saying that the struggles to build it and conflicts over its content would be trumped by its tribute to both loss and survival.


U.S. experts urge focus on ethics in brain research

Ethics must be considered early and often as the field of modern neuroscience forges ahead, to avoid repeating a dark period in history when lobotomies were common, experts said Wednesday. President Barack Obama sought the recommendations of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, as part of his $100 million Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative announced last year. It is "absolutely critical... to integrate ethics from the get-go into neuroscience research," and not "for the first time after something has gone wrong," said Amy Gutmann, Bioethics Commission Chair. Instead, it called for institutions and individuals engaged in neuroscience research, as well as government agencies and other funders, to integrate ethics early in research.


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