Kids' Health News

Popular teens are also bullied, study shows

As adolescents climb their school's social ladder, so does the risk of falling victim to bullying, with greater negative consequences, says a new study published in the American Sociological Review.

FDA approves Topamax for migraine prevention in adolescents

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Topamax (topiramate) for prevention (prophylaxis) of migraine headaches in adolescents ages 12 to 17. This is the first FDA approval of a drug for migraine prevention in this age group. The medication is taken on a daily basis to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches. Topamax was first approved by the FDA in 1996 to prevent seizures.

Obesity prevention programs can lower kids' blood pressure, even if they don't reduce body fat

One of the serious health consequences of obesity is elevated blood pressure (BP), a particular problem in children because research has found that high BP in children usually follows them into adulthood, carrying with it a wide range of possible negative consequences.Even modest elevations in the BP of adolescents, according to recent research, can pose cardiovascular problems later in life.

Preserving fertility in boys with cancer

Scientists have moved a step closer to being able to preserve fertility in young boys who undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer. The new research, published in Fertility and Sterility, the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, addresses the safety of an option scientists are developing for boys who aren't sexually mature and cannot bank sperm.

Chronic stress in early years leads to anxiety, aggression in adulthood

In recent years, behavioral neuroscientists have debated the meaning and significance of a plethora of independently conducted experiments seeking to establish the impact of chronic, early-life stress upon behavior - both at the time that stress is experienced, and upon the same individuals later in life, during adulthood.

Life-threatening experiences in infants likely involve esophageal function

About 1 percent of all emergency room visits are prompted by near-death experiences in infants, such as extended periods without breathing or sudden changes in skin pallor or muscle tone. What causes these frightening experiences is often unknown, but the result can be long hospital stays and neurological impairment.

Findings underscore the importance of universal pediatric cholesterol screening

Roughly one out of three kids screened for high cholesterol between the ages of 9 and 11 has borderline or high cholesterol, potentially placing them at greater risk for future cardiovascular disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session.

Influence of TV on snacking habits, cardiovascular risk in middle schoolers

Middle school kids who park themselves in front of the TV for two hours or more each day are more likely to consume junk food and have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even compared to those who spend an equal amount of time on the computer or playing video games, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session.

Cameroon to protect its children against leading cause of severe diarrhoea

Children in Cameroon will receive protection against rotavirus diarrhoea, thanks to the introduction of rotavirus vaccines in Cameroon's routine immunization programme with GAVI Alliance support. Rotavirus, the most common cause of severe and fatal diarrhoea, takes the lives of almost 6,000 Cameroonian children under five every year.

4 in 10 infants lack strong parental attachments

In a study of 14,000 U.S. children, 40 percent lack strong emotional bonds - what psychologists call "secure attachment" - with their parents that are crucial to success later in life, according to a new report. The researchers found that these children are more likely to face educational and behavioral problems.

Public resistance to soda tax, size restrictions

Those hoping to dilute Americans' taste for soda, energy drinks, sweetened tea, and other sugary beverages should take their quest to school lunchrooms rather than legislative chambers, according to a recent study by media and health policy experts.Soda taxes and beverage portion size restrictions were unpalatable to the 1,319 U.S.

Stronger kids have lower risks for diabetes and heart disease

It is well known that having good physical fitness lowers risks for a number of health problems. But now, the first study to make the link between strength capacity in adolescents and reduced risk for diabetes, heart disease or stroke has been published in the journal Pediatrics.

Closure of coal plant in China led to improvements in children's health

Decreased exposure to air pollution in utero is linked with improved childhood developmental scores and higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key protein for brain development, according to a study looking at the closure of a coal-burning power plant in China led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health.

Evaluating therapies for Menkes disease using PET scanning

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies in Japan have used PET imaging to visualize the distribution in the body of copper, which is deregulated in Menkes disease, a genetic disorder, using a mouse model. This study lays the groundwork for PET imaging studies on human Menkes disease patients to identify new therapy options.

'Autism rates soar 30% in 2 years,' CDC say

The number of US children with autism spectrum disorder has soared approximately 30% in the past 2 years, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In the surveillance summary report, published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers estimate that 1 in 68 children (14.

Pediatric Praziquantel Consortium expands into Brazil

Brazilian Farmanguinhos, part of Fiocruz, and UK-based Simcyp are reinforcing the international non-profit Pediatric Praziquantel Consortium. The aim of the Consortium is to develop and register a new pediatric formulation against schistosomiasis for preschool-age children, a group currently lacking a suitable treatment.

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