Kids' Health News

Teaching Assistants feel they make a difference to vulnerable children

A study on the role of Teaching Assistants (TAs) in primary schools has suggested that TAs perceive themselves to have a positive effect on children displaying challenging behaviour and believe that without their support many of these children would be excluded from mainstream school.

Two new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes

Research by the University of Exeter Medical School has revealed two new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes.The research, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, provides further insights on how the insulin-producing beta cells are formed in the pancreas. The team discovered that mutations in two specific genes which are important for development of the pancreas can cause the disease.

Risk for asthma in childhood may be increased by low diversity of gut bacteria

Low gut microbial diversity in the intestines of infants can increase the risk for asthma development. These are the findings of the age 7 follow-up in a multi-year study led by researchers at Linkoping University.In 2011 the results of a comprehensive survey of the intestinal microbiota of allergic and healthy children were published.

'Wellbeing improved' if children with autism recruit imaginary helpers

Researchers believe they have developed a psychological technique that improves the mental wellbeing of children with autism - through an activity that invents tiny characters the kids can then imagine are in their heads helping them out with their thoughts.

Brain rest may speed concussion recovery in teens

While for the last 10 years or so, there has been a general view among doctors and health experts in the US that people who suffer concussion should give their brains a rest while they recover, until now there has not been much firm evidence to back it up.

The loving touch is critical for premature infants

The benefit that premature infants gain from skin-to-skin contact with their mothers is measurable even 10 years after birth, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry.Physical contact with babies is essential for their physical and psychological development.

Vitamin D levels during pregnancy linked to offspring muscle strength

New research published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism suggests that mothers who have a higher intake of vitamin D during pregnancy are more likely to have children with stronger muscles.Vitamin D is known to help regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the bloodstream, as well as help cells to communicate.

Overweight linked with reduced lung function in children with a history of early childhood wheezing

Overweight and obesity are significant risk factors for reduced lung function in school-aged children with a history of early childhood wheezing, according to a study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The results also showed that the use of inhaled corticosteroids for asthma in childhood may result in reduced bone mineral density in early teenage years.

Inflated praise is actually harmful for children with low self-esteem

When children have low self-esteem, many adults try to build them up with supportive words of encouragement. A recent study confirms this by finding that adults tend to give kids with low confidence more inflated praise. But the study also finds that these children may actually shy away from new challenges in the wake of such excessive applause.

Who is using MyPlate?

Most Americans know about MyPyramid - the triangle depicting how many servings of each food group you should eat in a day - but who knows about MyPlate - the circle showing what a healthy meal looks like? MyPlate was created in 2011 by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to help American consumers put the Dietary Guidelines into practice.

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