Kids' Health News

Pregnancy: overactive immune system linked to offspring brain damage

In a mouse study, researchers found that fetal mice who were exposed in the womb to a maternal immune system in overdrive - due to an infection or other illness - displayed lasting signs of brain damage into adulthood. And the investigators believe their findings could be relevant to human neurologic diseases, such as schizophrenia and autism.

Get tough! How outward bound adventures increase teenage resilience

Today's youth face many debilitating situations in their lives such as depression, suicide, poverty, and physical issues. In this environment how can they develop coping strategies for life and personal resilience? How can we support them to do this?Hayhurst et al define resilience as "the ability to react to adversity and challenge in an adaptive and productive way".

Intervention in first 1000 days vital to fulfilling childhood potential

Safeguarding the healthy development of the next generation is vital for the long term success of the United Nation's Millennium Development goals. New research in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences highlights the need to integrate global strategies aimed at tackling nutrition and cognitive development within the first thousand days of childhood.

Crowdsourcing novel childhood predictors of adult obesity

Will your child be a slim adult? A novel new study published in PLOS ONE asked 532 international English speaking adults to submit or "crowd-source" predictors of whether a child is going to be an overweight or a slim adult. Each participant offered what they believed to be the best predictor of what a child would weigh as an adult and submitted it in the form of a question.

Improved detection of Down syndrome during pregnancy for younger women

New figures from the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register (NDSCR) based at Queen Mary University of London, reveal the proportion of Down syndrome cases diagnosed antenatally has increased in younger women. Furthermore, Down syndrome diagnoses are occurring earlier in pregnancy for women of all ages.

Widespread adolescent energy drink/shot use strongly associated with substance use

Nearly one-third of US adolescents consume high-caffeine energy drinks or "shots," and these teens report higher rates of alcohol, cigarette, or drug use, reports a study in the January/February Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Early treatment with AED reduces duration of febrile seizures

New research shows that children with febrile status epilepticus (FSE) who receive earlier treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) experience a reduction in the duration of the seizure. The study published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggests that a standard Emergency Medical Services (EMS) treatment protocol for FSE is needed in the U.S.

Violent video games delay the development of moral judgement in teens

Mirjana Bajovic of Brock University set out to discover whether there was a link between the types of video games teens played, how long they played them, and the teens' levels of moral reasoning: their ability to take the perspective of others into account.

Stem cells to treat lung disease in preterm infants

Advances in neonatal care for very preterm infants have greatly increased the chances of survival for these fragile infants. However, preterm infants have an increased risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a serious lung disease, which is a major cause of death and lifelong complications.

Lack of sleep and exercise, too much TV affects teens' mental health

In these modern times, it can be hard to prise away teenagers from the clutches of TV or video games. Now, new research suggests that high media use, combined with low physical activity and lack of sleep, may increase the risk of mental illness for adolescents.This is according to a study published in the journal World Psychiatry.

Important new blood test for Niemann-Pick disease type C, a devastating rare disease

A new blood test for a rare and devastating illness called Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) has been developed by a team of researchers led by Professor Frances Platt, University of Oxford.The results of the research, funded by children's charity Action Medical Research, are discussed in a paper now published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Gene associated with cerebral palsy and death in very preterm babies

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 at 2:45 p.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in New Orleans, researchers will report that a variant in SERPINE1, a gene involved in inflammation and blood clotting, is associated with cerebral palsy and death in very preterm babies.

Noninvasive prenatal testing detects more than 80 percent of chromosomal abnormalities

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 at 9 a.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in New Orleans, researchers will report that noninvasive prenatal testing detected 83.2 percent of chromosomal abnormalities normally picked up by invasive diagnostic testing strategies, such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis.

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