Kids' Health News

International study reveals that most children are unaware of cigarette warning labels

An international study of children's perceptions of cigarette package warning labels found that the majority of children are unaware that they exist. Children in countries where larger warning labels are used, and which include a compelling graphic image of the negative health impacts of smoking, were more likely to be aware of and understand the health risks of tobacco products.

Bedroom TVs a cause of childhood obesity, study suggests

Recent figures show that childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents over the past 3 decades. New research suggests that children who have televisions in their bedroom are more likely to gain weight, compared with those who do not have them in their bedroom.This is according to a study recently published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Students 'eat more fruits and vegetables' under new school lunch standards

In 2012, the US Department of Agriculture updated the guidelines on school lunches, recommending that schools should offer healthier meals to students. New research from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, MA, suggests that these guidelines have increased fruit and vegetable consumption among low-income students.

Infant sleep machines could damage babies' hearing

Some parents use "infant sleep machines" to mask environmental noises in busy households and help their babies get to sleep. But a new study finds that these machines can also contribute to hearing loss in babies.Any parent knows how difficult it is to get a baby to sleep and to stay asleep.

Effective treatment for youth anxiety disorders has lasting benefit

A study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that the majority of youth with moderate to severe anxiety disorders responded well to acute treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication (sertraline), or a combination of both.

Mental health problems mistaken for physical illness in children

Many children are admitted to general acute wards with mental health problems mistaken for physical disease.Somatic symptoms, such as abdominal pain, headaches, limb pain and tiredness, often mask underlying problems and result in the NHS spending money on investigations to eliminate wrongly diagnosed disease.

Why autism is more common in males

Males are at greater risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), than females, but the underlying reasons have been unclear.

Ability to metabolize drugs reduced by low birth weight

Researchers have identified another concern related to low birth weight - a difference in how the body reacts to drugs, which may last a person's entire life and further complicate treatment of illnesses or diseases that are managed with medications.

Cases of food allergy 'have doubled in black children'

Though food allergies are on the rise in children, researchers are reporting in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology that self-reported food allergy has nearly doubled over the past 23 years in black children. The investigators say their results could show a possible food allergy prediction.

Black men at lifelong health disadvantage following childhood adversity

Greater childhood adversity helps to explain why black men are less healthy than white men, and some of this effect appears to operate through childhood adversity's enduring influence on the relationships black men have as adults, according to a new study in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Children's health spending increased between 2009-2012 despite recession

Health care spending higher for boys than girls; rise in teen use of prescriptions and mental health services; spending on babies highest of any children's age groupSpending on health care for children covered by employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) increased between 2009 and 2012, rising an average 5.

In South Africa harvested rainwater harbors pathogens

South Africa has been financing domestic rainwater harvesting tanks in informal low-income settlements and rural areas in five of that nation's nine provinces. But pathogens inhabit such harvested rainwater, potentially posing a public health hazard, especially for children and immunocompromised individuals, according to a team from the University of Stellenbosch.

Superior parenting makes breastfed babies so smart

Loads of studies over the years have shown that children who were breastfed score higher on IQ tests and perform better in school, but the reason why remained unclear.Is it the mother-baby bonding time, something in the milk itself or some unseen attribute of mothers who breastfeed their babies?

Fear of death may deter youths from texting whilst driving

While drivers tend to believe it is dangerous to text and drive, many say they can still do it safely. Now Washington State University researchers say drivers can be discouraged from the practice with public service announcements that evoke their fear of death in graphic terms.Looking to curb what former U.S.

Head lice eggs removed with ordinary conditioner

Eggs from head lice, also called nits, are incredibly difficult to remove. Female lice lay eggs directly onto strands of hair, and they cement them in place with a glue-like substance, making them hard to get rid of. In fact, the eggs are glued down so strongly that they will stay in place even after hair has been treated with pediculicides -- substances used to kill lice.

In Tanzania febrile illnesses in children most often due to viral infections

Most children ill with fever in Tanzania suffer from a viral infection, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows. A research team led by Dr. Valérie D'Acremont from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel and the Policlinique Médicale Universitaire in Lausanne systematically assessed the causes of febrile illnesses in Tanzanian children.

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